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View Full Version : State of the NBA by David Falk (now, near future)



JordansBulls
02-24-2009, 05:44 PM
Source: NYtimes (http://www.nytimes.com/2009/02/23/sports/basketball/23falk.html?_r=1&ref=basketball)




The N.B.A.’s system is broken, Falk says, and fixing it will require radical measures that almost guarantee a standoff in 2011, when the collective bargaining agreement expires.

“I think it’s going to be very, very extreme,” Falk said, “because I think that the times are extreme.”

How extreme? Falk said he believed Stern, the commissioner, would push for a hard salary cap, shorter contracts, a higher age limit on incoming players, elimination of the midlevel cap exception and an overall reduction in the players’ percentage of revenue. And, Falk said, Stern will probably get what he wants.

“The owners have the economic wherewithal to shut the thing down for two years, whatever it takes, to get a system that will work long term,” he said in an extensive interview to discuss his new book. “The players do not have the economic wherewithal to sit out one year.”


Their conciliatory tone sounded promising, but Falk seemed skeptical. In his view, the union botched negotiations in 1998, which led to the three-month lockout, the only labor stoppage in league history. The union tried to stave off a luxury tax and maximum player salaries but ultimately had to accept both in order to strike a deal in January 1999 and save the season.

“The players lost 40 percent of their salaries, and they got a worse deal in January,” Falk said. “So as we approach 2011, my overwhelming feeling is, let’s not make the same dumb mistake as in 1998.”

The players, he said, must recognize that the owners have the ultimate leverage. Many are billionaires for whom owning an N.B.A. team is merely a pricey hobby. Some of them are losing “enormous amounts of money” and would rather shut down the league for a year or two than continue with the current system.

So Falk is urging the union to take a more cooperative approach.

“And if we don’t do that, in my opinion, there’s an overwhelming probability that the owners will shut it down,” he said.

Naturally, Falk has strong opinions about what is ailing the league. He believes too many average players make too much money, while the stars — Kobe Bryant, LeBron James, Dwyane Wade — do not make enough. Falk would eliminate the cap for the superstars and, at the other end, abolish the midlevel exception, which allows teams to give $30 million deals to role players.

Unlike most of his peers, and the union leadership, Falk is an advocate of the age limit, which Stern won during collective bargaining negotiations in 2005. Falk said the limit, now 19 years old, should be raised to 20 or 21.

VCaintdead17
02-24-2009, 05:49 PM
I really hope they dont get rid of the MLE, all this budget cutting means less players, and less players will in a way mean less stars, and less stars means less viewers. I like it how it is now

JordansBulls
02-24-2009, 06:16 PM
I think guys get too much right now anyway and if teams are stuggling to fill the seats and get paid then it makes sense. I just hope there is not a strike.

bogdanrom
02-24-2009, 06:32 PM
Raising the age limit is such a stupid thing. On the contrary I think it should be lowered again to kids coming out of high school. Raising the age limit will help the teams financially, but for the players, this is a horrible idea. Especially if you are coming from an underprivileged place. Most of these kids need help with money for them, their family and others. I know they might turn into busts,but what if they kid goes to college or Europe(which will become a hotter commodity if they raise the age) and gets injured, let's say for a long time or career ending. Then what? Then everyone's screwed. The player, his family, his friends, the college or his pro team, and the NBA. Instead of raising the age limit, they should install more programs to recruit this kids better, and programs to get them more used to the NBA. They can range from helping them out with their skills, managing money, managing time, and getting better acquainted with the NBA.

KobeIs
02-24-2009, 06:56 PM
I don't think the age limit should be raised, I believe that if a player is good enough to play in the NBA then they should be allow to.

The only thing that I agree with him about is that players get too much money. To me, it's just wrong if u have an athlete getting more then doctors or other ppl that had to go through many years of school. But that's just me.

dougie5627
02-24-2009, 07:13 PM
superstars will go to europe where the money can be rediculous. look for more players to skip college and go to europe as well, steady income before nba sounds more appealing than risking serious injuries. leave the league as it is if teams wana wasted there money on average players its their decision if not that what the sign and trade is for.

JIDsanity
02-24-2009, 07:16 PM
I don't think the age limit should be raised, I believe that if a player is good enough to play in the NBA then they should be allow to.

The only thing that I agree with him about is that players get too much money. To me, it's just wrong if u have an athlete getting more then doctors or other ppl that had to go through many years of school. But that's just me.

And that's one of the main problems, there would be no talk of this if players didn't make so much money. What player needs more than 5 mill/year. Being realistic. Thats a lot of money and in my eyes still too much, but is fair. If every player made 5 mill or less the league would be amazing

prash
02-24-2009, 08:38 PM
The contracts should be a lot shorter. If a guy like McGrady wasn't making $20+ million a year today for playing well 5 years ago, I'm sure that he'd be working a lot harder to stay healthy.

Almost all of the player making $20+ million a year for playing basketball today don't deserve it. Contracts should never be more than 5 years in the NBA.

Sox Appeal
02-25-2009, 02:37 AM
The NBA's 'age limit' is BY FAR the worst rule in pro sports. Saying that somebody isn't aloud to make a living for themselves at the age of 18 is unconstitutional. And I feel sorry for the players who suffer from the rule. Imagine if you're some 18 year old kid with incredible basketball talents, and you're living in the worst neighborhood in Chicago or New York (I'm talking the worst, of the worst..) and you have an opportunity to get you and you're family out of that situation, you should be aloud to do so.

Wilson
02-25-2009, 02:55 AM
Raising the age limit is such a stupid thing. On the contrary I think it should be lowered again to kids coming out of high school. Raising the age limit will help the teams financially, but for the players, this is a horrible idea. Especially if you are coming from an underprivileged place. Most of these kids need help with money for them, their family and others. I know they might turn into busts,but what if they kid goes to college or Europe(which will become a hotter commodity if they raise the age) and gets injured, let's say for a long time or career ending. Then what? Then everyone's screwed. The player, his family, his friends, the college or his pro team, and the NBA. Instead of raising the age limit, they should install more programs to recruit this kids better, and programs to get them more used to the NBA. They can range from helping them out with their skills, managing money, managing time, and getting better acquainted with the NBA.

Well the counter to that is a lot of these kids have been awarded a free education for being good at sports, a luxury which many do not enjoy. Since they've been given this opportunity, they could actually focus in their classes as well as on the court. Then, even if they do suffer an injury, they can still go on to have productive and fruitful careers, which can still rescue them and their families from terrible situations.

About the article, good God I hope that we don't have to go without the NBA for two years! :speechless:

I hope they don't get rid of the MLE. It says that it's wrong to pay a role player $30 million. Well it's only $5 million per season, which is about right for a role player if a superstar is on $20 million +.

Shortening the contracts couldn't be a bad thing though.

codes238
02-25-2009, 04:15 AM
i fully agree with this, i think the main thing to do is to cut the max length of a contract down to 3 years... that will eliminate players like tim thomas and jerome james getting huge paydays based on trying for half a season every 5 years... most NBA players are overpaid whiners and im glad the league is heading this way...

Spurred1
02-25-2009, 04:23 AM
Surprised that Falk thinks that the stars aren't paid enough.Regardless of status-star or role player, all players are overpaid obscene amounts of money. Give me a break. And the contract limits do need to be cut down-it would be better financially for the teams overall. Now, if only there was a way to structure a contract that can be changed based on the player's performance...
For example, Ericka Dampier is being paid millions when he should be earning minimum wage-and I'm not talking about NBA minimum wages, I mean real life minimum wage.

Becks2307
02-25-2009, 04:39 AM
surprised that falk thinks that the stars aren't paid enough.regardless of status-star or role player, all players are overpaid obscene amounts of money. Give me a break. And the contract limits do need to be cut down-it would be better financially for the teams overall. Now, if only there was a way to structure a contract that can be changed based on the player's performance...
For example, ericka dampier is being paid millions when he should be earning minimum wage-and i'm not talking about nba minimum wages, i mean real life minimum wage.


lol

LakeShowRaider
02-25-2009, 05:32 AM
Man...if the NBA get shut down for 2 years. I would absolutely DIE!!!

JordansBulls
02-25-2009, 09:36 AM
Well the counter to that is a lot of these kids have been awarded a free education for being good at sports, a luxury which many do not enjoy. Since they've been given this opportunity, they could actually focus in their classes as well as on the court. Then, even if they do suffer an injury, they can still go on to have productive and fruitful careers, which can still rescue them and their families from terrible situations.

About the article, good God I hope that we don't have to go without the NBA for two years! :speechless:

I hope they don't get rid of the MLE. It says that it's wrong to pay a role player $30 million. Well it's only $5 million per season, which is about right for a role player if a superstar is on $20 million +.

Shortening the contracts couldn't be a bad thing though.

Well said.

HOZ THE KNICK
02-25-2009, 09:39 AM
west is better as a confrence but the east has better teams.

SteveNash
02-25-2009, 10:04 AM
Well I think it's clear that the owners will have most of the leverage, but I doubt it's going to be to the extreme that Falk is talking about. Stern may push for all of those things, but he's clearly not going to get them.


Surprised that Falk thinks that the stars aren't paid enough.Regardless of status-star or role player, all players are overpaid obscene amounts of money. Give me a break. And the contract limits do need to be cut down-it would be better financially for the teams overall. Now, if only there was a way to structure a contract that can be changed based on the player's performance...
For example, Ericka Dampier is being paid millions when he should be earning minimum wage-and I'm not talking about NBA minimum wages, I mean real life minimum wage.

I hear this stuff every time and it's ridiculous.

If every player in the league was overpaid, the league would have folded already. Players bring in the dollars, and they should be compensated for it.

I agree with Falk that there should be a bigger gap between star players and role players, but I don't see how they're ever going to break free players accepting less than the max. How much would Rashard Lewis be making right now if there was no limit to his contract, and some would argue that Rashard is a role player right now.


Well the counter to that is a lot of these kids have been awarded a free education for being good at sports, a luxury which many do not enjoy. Since they've been given this opportunity, they could actually focus in their classes as well as on the court. Then, even if they do suffer an injury, they can still go on to have productive and fruitful careers, which can still rescue them and their families from terrible situations.

Why should the NBA help the NCAA in monopolizing the young talent? Some basketball players aren't ever going to be good students, but they may be great athletes, why force them to do something they don't want to do? Why should star athletes be forced into school making them millions of dollars while only getting a fraction of that back in scholarships that he may not even want?

So lets say your the next LeBron James, there's no age limit. You can either:

A-Enter the NBA draft, get picked first, get I'd say at least $25 million guaranteed without ever playing an NBA game.

B-Enter college for 1+ years, take a chance of getting injured and not earning a dime by playing basketball, get a 4 year degree and make $50,000 a year.

The choice is clear.

Ask every senior in high school if they'd rather win the lottery or get a 4 year scholarship. Oh and the 4 year scholarship comes with the price of having to travel around the country and hours practicing wasting time you could be using studying.

Wilson
02-25-2009, 12:52 PM
Why should the NBA help the NCAA in monopolizing the young talent? Some basketball players aren't ever going to be good students, but they may be great athletes, why force them to do something they don't want to do? Why should star athletes be forced into school making them millions of dollars while only getting a fraction of that back in scholarships that he may not even want?

So lets say your the next LeBron James, there's no age limit. You can either:

A-Enter the NBA draft, get picked first, get I'd say at least $25 million guaranteed without ever playing an NBA game.

B-Enter college for 1+ years, take a chance of getting injured and not earning a dime by playing basketball, get a 4 year degree and make $50,000 a year.

The choice is clear.

Ask every senior in high school if they'd rather win the lottery or get a 4 year scholarship. Oh and the 4 year scholarship comes with the price of having to travel around the country and hours practicing wasting time you could be using studying.

I'm sure that anyone would take $25 million over $50'000. What you're forgetting, however, is that not everyone that comes out early (or skipped college all together) turns out like LeBron. A lot of guys come out early, find out they can't play, and then what?

I think that anyone who gets a free education at a great college or university has to take advantage and get that degree. Like I said before, there are plenty of people who aren't lucky enough to be good enough at sports to get awarded a free education.

JordansBulls
02-25-2009, 04:32 PM
I'm sure that anyone would take $25 million over $50'000. What you're forgetting, however, is that not everyone that comes out early (or skipped college all together) turns out like LeBron. A lot of guys come out early, find out they can't play, and then what?

I think that anyone who gets a free education at a great college or university has to take advantage and get that degree. Like I said before, there are plenty of people who aren't lucky enough to be good enough at sports to get awarded a free education.

Very true, but you gotta remember some guys are already in financial trouble and have children in high school and thus as soon as they can make the pro's they will go for it.

Wilson
02-25-2009, 04:57 PM
Very true, but you gotta remember some guys are already in financial trouble and have children in high school and thus as soon as they can make the pro's they will go for it.

That is true. I remember Allen Iverson getting interviewed by Chris Rock where he mentions that. What I mean though, is that there are plenty of guys who enter the NBA early (and straight out of high school before the rule was changed), only to discover that they can't play at that level, so they're left without a job and without a degree.

I think that there should be some better advising given to athletes considering declaring for the draft. Student-athletes can always see the huge pay day ahead of them, but there isn't anyone there to tell them when they're not good enough. There should be some unbiased scouts that can advise them on whether they'd be better off staying in college or going to the NBA.

JordansBulls
02-25-2009, 10:58 PM
That is true. I remember Allen Iverson getting interviewed by Chris Rock where he mentions that. What I mean though, is that there are plenty of guys who enter the NBA early (and straight out of high school before the rule was changed), only to discover that they can't play at that level, so they're left without a job and without a degree.

I think that there should be some better advising given to athletes considering declaring for the draft. Student-athletes can always see the huge pay day ahead of them, but there isn't anyone there to tell them when they're not good enough. There should be some unbiased scouts that can advise them on whether they'd be better off staying in college or going to the NBA.

How many of the guys that came into the league from high school already had a kid?

I know Lebron did, but I am not sure what other stars have.

mrblisterdundee
02-25-2009, 11:10 PM
Any NBA player that complains about how much money they make should probably have both their knee caps broken, so they can see what it's like in the working class.

Wilson
02-25-2009, 11:49 PM
How many of the guys that came into the league from high school already had a kid?

I know Lebron did, but I am not sure what other stars have.

Well how many guys with have come straight out of high school, only to discover that they can't play in the NBA, and they have no education to fall back on?

NYK All the Way
02-26-2009, 12:08 AM
the age limit is fine by me...go to the d-league or overseas, develop your skills and then get drafted and paid or maybe better yet GO TO COLLEGE AND LEARN SOMETHING maybe then if you get injured you won't have to worry about any financial aid or loans that you'll have to pay back, you'll be getting a degree for FREE and will have the opportunity for a rewarding career that so many others DO NOT HAVE.

bogdanrom
04-10-2009, 03:07 PM
Well the counter to that is a lot of these kids have been awarded a free education for being good at sports, a luxury which many do not enjoy. Since they've been given this opportunity, they could actually focus in their classes as well as on the court. Then, even if they do suffer an injury, they can still go on to have productive and fruitful careers, which can still rescue them and their families from terrible situations.

About the article, good God I hope that we don't have to go without the NBA for two years! :speechless:

I hope they don't get rid of the MLE. It says that it's wrong to pay a role player $30 million. Well it's only $5 million per season, which is about right for a role player if a superstar is on $20 million +.

Shortening the contracts couldn't be a bad thing though.

The problem most of these kids who gets the free education will not benefit from it because they don't care about anything else except for basketball. Very few will go through college wanting and receiving a proper education that will help for a life after basketball. And making even $500,000 a year in basketball is better than a lot of jobs out there.

bogdanrom
04-10-2009, 03:11 PM
Well how many guys with have come straight out of high school, only to discover that they can't play in the NBA, and they have no education to fall back on?

Even if they went to college you're predicting they will automatically learn something and be able to have a prosperous career. Most guys won't go to college too get an education but because it's allows them to show what they got to pursue basketball as a career and as a job. If they go to the NBA, they realized that they can't play there they will still make a couple hundred thousand a year, maybe even a million or two (which is more that a lot of people in this world make). But let's say they go to college and find out after that they can't play, and they haven't studied or prepared for another career. They are screwed. Let the player and his family decide when he's ready.

IRUAM #21
04-10-2009, 03:12 PM
**** this !

SteveNash
04-10-2009, 04:00 PM
I'm sure that anyone would take $25 million over $50'000. What you're forgetting, however, is that not everyone that comes out early (or skipped college all together) turns out like LeBron. A lot of guys come out early, find out they can't play, and then what?

I think that anyone who gets a free education at a great college or university has to take advantage and get that degree. Like I said before, there are plenty of people who aren't lucky enough to be good enough at sports to get awarded a free education.

You don't have to be the next LeBron James. You just have to be labeled as one.

Even if you turn into a complete bust, you're still have made more money then you'd need to last you a lifetime.

Why do you keep bringing up free education like it means something to players that are going to be drafted in the NBA? Being given a minimum salary in the NBA for a year will pay off your 4 year college experience. Even Korleone Young has made enough money to attend college, he just didn't want to.

Some players don't want to attend college and it should be their right to chose what they want to do with their careers when they're 18.

superkegger
04-10-2009, 04:14 PM
You don't have to be the next LeBron James. You just have to be labeled as one.

Even if you turn into a complete bust, you're still have made more money then you'd need to last you a lifetime.

Why do you keep bringing up free education like it means something to players that are going to be drafted in the NBA? Being given a minimum salary in the NBA for a year will pay off your 4 year college experience. Even Korleone Young has made enough money to attend college, he just didn't want to.

Some players don't want to attend college and it should be their right to chose what they want to do with their careers when they're 18.

Agreed, if they're 18, they can vote, and they can get drafted, but they can't play in the NBA.

Of course, then again playing the NBA is a right, but a privilege, and they have every right in the world to set age restrictions.

I think something needs to be done about it though. Part of the problem is, with them going to college, it creates problems with agents trying to snag them, and could make things hairy that way, (see Kevin Love and OJ Mayo's stories), but you still have that same problem with them coming right out of high school. I don't know how they can fix it, but they need to figure out some way to.