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View Full Version : Should retired NBA players just stop becoming GMs?



DenButsu
12-08-2008, 10:22 PM
Anytime there's a discussion of the league's crappiest GMs, it seems to me like there are a disproportionately heavy number of former players in the mix.

Maybe dudes should just stick with coaching? :shrug:

NBAkYD
12-08-2008, 10:26 PM
yes. That job should be reserved for real Basketball Operations Experts. Like Billy King

hotpotato1092
12-08-2008, 10:33 PM
I get really annoyed when former players become GMs with no front office experience, there are people who have worked for the team for years and have a lot of experience in the front office who are a lot more qualified, but owners want to make a splash so they hire the unexperienced former player who will inevitably fail. It's ridiculous. what happened to starting at the bottom and working your way up?

bagwell368
12-08-2008, 10:42 PM
Yeah, Ainge sucks so bad.... :rimshot:

Daze9900
12-08-2008, 10:43 PM
No what needs to happen is that they need to have the proper training before they assume such responsibilities. If you stopped having players that are general managers you then have guys in suits who are good with numbers but not really understanding what type of players mix together, the on and off the court chemistry needed to make a team and it personnel work cohesively. You don't give guys like Steve Kerr who sounded smart because he was on the tnt booth the job; you don't give Isiah Thomas a job because he smiles alot, you make them either take NBA provided training or on the job training as assistants to GMs. There is something valuable to the GM position when the guy who is changing peoples lives by offering them work, or uprooting them from their families, getting international players is somebody who's been a part of it and knows what it feels like. The numbers aspect and the player/personell part they can learn.

Joshtd1
12-08-2008, 10:45 PM
^^Good post. Agreed

Hawkeye15
12-08-2008, 10:51 PM
The old saying is, those who can't do, teach. Some of the best players are terrible judges of talent, and bad teachers. Just because someone is awesome at something personally, doesn't mean they are anything short of inept passing it on

jetsfan89
12-08-2008, 10:53 PM
other than joe dumars i agree, they've all sucked.

DerekRE_3
12-08-2008, 10:54 PM
Geoff Petrie is the exception. He would have been more known for his playing days and not his drafting skills if a knee injury hadn't happened to him. People forget he was a rookie of the year and got 24.8 ppg his rookie year, not to mention 5 assists. He was also won the GM of the year award.

ARMIN12NBA
12-08-2008, 11:03 PM
other than joe dumars i agree, they've all sucked.

Jerry West? The GM who nabbed Shaquille O'neal, Kobe Bryant, and Derek Fisher all in one summer. The GM who drafted James Worthy and Eddie Jones and is credited for building the Showtime Lakers. Not to mention the GM who traded Norm Nixon for Byron Scott. Yet he sucked?

Sport
12-08-2008, 11:13 PM
Yeah, Ainge sucks so bad.... :rimshot:

Actually Ainge did get alot of heat before he acquired Garnett and Ray Allen.

You can thank Kevin Mchale for that one.

handbanana55
12-08-2008, 11:16 PM
there is always an exception to the rule

superkegger
12-08-2008, 11:19 PM
I think really good players need to stop becoming GM's. Being a great basketball player doesn't give you a good eye for talent. You might recognize who can play basketball well, but thats the extent of it, not how it will fit on the team, and within your style of play. I mean lets be honest, there have been a lot of bad GM's period, not just former players. As mentioned, they've not gotten the proper training and so on and so forth. To be a good GM requires quite a bit, and I think a lot of people have failed at it, and assembling a good team is no easy task.

sp1derm00
12-08-2008, 11:21 PM
I think really good players need to stop becoming GM's. Being a great basketball player doesn't give you a good eye for talent. You might recognize who can play basketball well, but thats the extent of it, not how it will fit on the team, and within your style of play. I mean lets be honest, there have been a lot of bad GM's period, not just former players. As mentioned, they've not gotten the proper training and so on and so forth. To be a good GM requires quite a bit, and I think a lot of people have failed at it, and assembling a good team is no easy task.

Which is why Jerry West should never have become the Lakers GM.

superkegger
12-08-2008, 11:24 PM
Which is why Jerry West should never have become the Lakers GM.

what?

Hawkeye15
12-08-2008, 11:26 PM
Jerry West? The GM who nabbed Shaquille O'neal, Kobe Bryant, and Derek Fisher all in one summer. The GM who drafted James Worthy and Eddie Jones and is credited for building the Showtime Lakers. Not to mention the GM who traded Norm Nixon for Byron Scott. Yet he sucked?

totally, I was thinking the same thing. The majority of them suck, but there are some exceptions, and West is the leading example

sp1derm00
12-08-2008, 11:30 PM
what?

Exactly.

DenButsu
12-08-2008, 11:32 PM
Just to re-frame the thread title question a little...

Of course I'm not suggesting NO players should EVER become GMs. But it seems that especially in more recent years more and more players are starting to view the progression from player to GM as a natural one. Basically what I'm questioning here is that assumption they're making, that having been a player (even a great player) in the NBA somehow puts you on a career track alignment that makes you qualified to take over the management of an NBA team.

hotpotato1092
12-08-2008, 11:36 PM
The good: West, Dumars, Peotrie, Ainge (debatable)
The bad: Vandewegh (sp?), Isiah, Mchale, Elgin Baylor, Both Paxsons, Michael Jordan, Steve Kerr, Chris Mullin, and several more I can't think of.
I think the bad outweighs the good for sure.

ARMIN12NBA
12-08-2008, 11:50 PM
The good: West, Dumars, Peotrie, Ainge (debatable)
The bad: Vandewegh (sp?), Isiah, Mchale, Elgin Baylor, Both Paxsons, Michael Jordan, Steve Kerr, Chris Mullin, and several more I can't think of.
I think the bad outweighs the good for sure.

You should include Mitch Kupchak into the good category IMO.

superkegger
12-09-2008, 12:27 AM
Exactly.

ok, way to prove a point? whatever.


Just to re-frame the thread title question a little...

Of course I'm not suggesting NO players should EVER become GMs. But it seems that especially in more recent years more and more players are starting to view the progression from player to GM as a natural one. Basically what I'm questioning here is that assumption they're making, that having been a player (even a great player) in the NBA somehow puts you on a career track alignment that makes you qualified to take over the management of an NBA team.

Yeah, I think that being a GM is just a talent some people will have and some wont, but a lot of former players want to be one.

And because teams ultimately want "basketball people" running basketball operations, guys who played thus become "logically" the people to go to. And great players seem like even better choices. But I think it's pretty clear at this point that great players rarely make good GM's. I think we can all be pretty sure Kobe would be just as bad as Jordan as a GM.

I do think its natural for players to later on become involved with the basketball operations side of teams though. I think giving them free reign like Jordan has in Charlotte is dangerous, and you need checks and balances as well as good people surrounding your GM.

Draco
12-09-2008, 12:34 AM
Just to re-frame the thread title question a little...

Of course I'm not suggesting NO players should EVER become GMs. But it seems that especially in more recent years more and more players are starting to view the progression from player to GM as a natural one. Basically what I'm questioning here is that assumption they're making, that having been a player (even a great player) in the NBA somehow puts you on a career track alignment that makes you qualified to take over the management of an NBA team.

Then look at the owners.. Those who treat their franchise as a business, hire quality GM's. Those who treat their franchise as a toy, hire assclowns like Isiah Thomas.

superkegger
12-09-2008, 01:12 AM
Then look at the owners.. Those who treat their franchise as a business, hire quality GM's. Those who treat their franchise as a toy, hire assclowns like Isiah Thomas.

I think this article is relevant to the discussion.

Source: Yahoo!Sports (http://sports.yahoo.com/nba/news;_ylt=AgbJipq4U4GtZ2MLkmGaPJG8vLYF?slug=aw-mchale120808&prov=yhoo&type=lgns)

Well I was going to put a highlight, but really, you just need to read the article. Its about Glen Taylor and Kevin Mchale

JJ81
12-09-2008, 09:00 AM
Derek Fisher will get involved when he's retired, no doubt.

Wilson
12-09-2008, 09:15 AM
You should include Mitch Kupchak into the good category IMO.

I don't know, he's been a bit lucky...


Derek Fisher will get involved when he's retired, no doubt.

I've always seen Fisher as more of a coach than a GM.

Faneik
12-09-2008, 09:20 AM
There are more bad examples than good.

Ainge 2 summers ago, made moves to transform a young rebuilding team in a win now franchise. His plan (owners too, obviously) worked and we were champions. So I'm 100% with Ainge, although we will strugle in a few years. But Ainge did his job, he brought us what we wanted.

Blazin_101
12-09-2008, 10:37 AM
Kevin Pritchard is an ex player and he seems to be doing pretty good for the Blazers.

hotpotato1092
12-09-2008, 12:34 PM
I'm just pointing it out, but of the teams that have been consistently on top in the last five or so years (Dallas, San Antonio, Phoenix, Detroit) three have had non player GMs (Jerry Colangelo, R.C Buford, Donnie Nelson) while one had a player (Joe Dumars). These four teams have been the teams that have played the most consistently over the last few years, thought I'd point that out.