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View Full Version : Would a Depression affect the L?



Kyben36
09-25-2008, 09:06 PM
Just Curious as to what would hapen to sports if there was a Depresion. our economy is bad right now and was just wondering what you thought

bogdanrom
09-25-2008, 09:33 PM
People couldn't afford tickets, and owners would have no money so there would be little to no pro sports but there will always be sports.

dre1990
09-25-2008, 09:36 PM
there aint goin to be any deppression. dont worry bout it

JOSETHEALLSTAR
09-25-2008, 10:01 PM
people wont buy tickets

cmellofan15
09-25-2008, 10:07 PM
Maurbury will keep ballin so it doesn't matter

Jonathan2323
09-25-2008, 10:41 PM
The NBA and the Economy

Today I had the opportunity to ask an NBA executive just how the economic downturn might impact the world of professional sports in general and the NBA specifically. The bottom line is, it's not likely to affect the NBA in a drastic way, and teams are not yet beginning to take the economy into consideration when they consider the size of contracts, what they can offer free agents, and who they should target as potential additions to their teams.

Here's why.

When you, as a consumer, find it necessary to tighten your budget, you start with things that aren't really all that important to you. Maybe it's the $4 cup of coffee you buy at Starbuck's on your way to work; maybe you decide to rent a DVD instead of spending $50 taking the whole family to a movie. Maybe you trade in your SUV or pick-up for a Prius, which gets 50-60 miles per gallon. Maybe you drive somewhere on vacation instead of flying. Maybe you eat at home more often to save the money is costs to eat out. In short, there are myriad ways to tighten your budget that don't involve giving up a cultural identifier like following your professional sports team.

A sports team is more than mere entertainment. A community comes together around a franchise, and thus the franchise defines the community in many ways. When you think Los Angeles you probably think Lakers first. When you think about Pittsburgh, it's the Steelers who come to mind. Boston . . .Celtics or Red Sox. New York . . .Yankees, Mets, or Knicks are likely to be right up there with the Statue of Liberty, the Empire State Building, and Times Square. You get the point - a team defines the community where it plays.

I was raised in Houston, and as such I always notice when I see someone wearing a Rockets jersey. If I'm in Oregon and pass someone wearing an Olajuwon jersey I immediately have something in common with that person. We have a bond that surpasses our family lives or our views on religion, politics, or current events. I can have a 30-minute conversation with that person without ever leaving the subject of the Houston Rockets. There's a power in that interaction, that identification, which goes beyond what it costs for a ticket to see the game. If I have to give up Starbuck's to afford my season ticket, I'll happily sacrifice the coffee. How many times have you struck up a conversation with someone just because you saw them drinking your favorite coffee? Probably never.

When die-hard NBA fans think about themselves, they often define themselves this way:

"I am a father, a brother, a son, a lawyer, and a die-hard Lakers fan who believes Kobe Bryant is God."

You know that person, right? The Lakers are just as important in identifying that guy as his name is. He has the license plate frame on his car, he has a 72" flat screen so he can watch NBA League Pass in Hi-Def, he has a framed Magic Johnson jersey in his living room (which his wife complains about constantly), and the mere mention of Chris Paul's MVP-worthy play is enough to make his blood boil. That guy is going to give up coffee, movies, and maybe even his children before he gives up his season tickets to see the Lakers.

You see, to our prototypical NBA fan, the Lakers are more than entertainment; they're part of who he is on a fundamental level. As much as anything else, he's a Lakers Fan.

Teams, it should be noted, also do their part to be valuable members of the societies in which they are located. We've seen that extensively with the way the New Orleans Hornets and Saints helped the people of New Orleans recover from Hurricane Katrina, and the way the Rockets have been working to help people in Houston recover from Hurricane Ike. So it truly works both ways.

It's naive, of course, to think that the current economic downturn won't eventually impact the NBA if allowed to continue. But it would also be a mistake to discount professional sports as mere entertainment. Not only is team association a huge part of the American psyche, but we will also turn to our favorite teams as a means to forget - even if only for a couple of hours - just how bad things might be outside those arena doors.


----Hoopsworld

scottie
09-25-2008, 11:02 PM
Yes a Depression would affect the NBA and all other pro sports. No debate. Durring a depression you don't "tighten" your spending and not get Starbucks, or rent a DVD instead of going to the movies. You have no money, no access to money/credit, and no job. That would mess with everyone.

SAVAGE CLAW
09-25-2008, 11:53 PM
It deppends in how DEEP the depression is.

If it is something we just get afraid for some months and then dissapears with a ne blossom of welfare state like it happened after 70s crisis then nothing is happening to sports.

ON the other side, if it becomes a real burden, and due to Neocon "solutions" Mid class goes into oblivion and we all become 16 hours a day workers for a even lower minimum salary with almost no vacation and with the contast risk of being fired for free....

then yes sports will have a real hard time

danbola
09-26-2008, 12:08 AM
Yes a Depression would affect the NBA and all other pro sports. No debate. Durring a depression you don't "tighten" your spending and not get Starbucks, or rent a DVD instead of going to the movies. You have no money, no access to money/credit, and no job. That would mess with everyone.

Exactly. If we did run into another Depression, sports would be the last thing on your mind. You will be concentrating on how to keep yourself eating.

Beno7500
09-26-2008, 12:10 AM
Of course it would.

LAKERS 24/7
09-26-2008, 01:52 AM
The NBA and the Economy

Today I had the opportunity to ask an NBA executive just how the economic downturn might impact the world of professional sports in general and the NBA specifically. The bottom line is, it's not likely to affect the NBA in a drastic way, and teams are not yet beginning to take the economy into consideration when they consider the size of contracts, what they can offer free agents, and who they should target as potential additions to their teams.

Here's why.

When you, as a consumer, find it necessary to tighten your budget, you start with things that aren't really all that important to you. Maybe it's the $4 cup of coffee you buy at Starbuck's on your way to work; maybe you decide to rent a DVD instead of spending $50 taking the whole family to a movie. Maybe you trade in your SUV or pick-up for a Prius, which gets 50-60 miles per gallon. Maybe you drive somewhere on vacation instead of flying. Maybe you eat at home more often to save the money is costs to eat out. In short, there are myriad ways to tighten your budget that don't involve giving up a cultural identifier like following your professional sports team.

A sports team is more than mere entertainment. A community comes together around a franchise, and thus the franchise defines the community in many ways. When you think Los Angeles you probably think Lakers first. When you think about Pittsburgh, it's the Steelers who come to mind. Boston . . .Celtics or Red Sox. New York . . .Yankees, Mets, or Knicks are likely to be right up there with the Statue of Liberty, the Empire State Building, and Times Square. You get the point - a team defines the community where it plays.

I was raised in Houston, and as such I always notice when I see someone wearing a Rockets jersey. If I'm in Oregon and pass someone wearing an Olajuwon jersey I immediately have something in common with that person. We have a bond that surpasses our family lives or our views on religion, politics, or current events. I can have a 30-minute conversation with that person without ever leaving the subject of the Houston Rockets. There's a power in that interaction, that identification, which goes beyond what it costs for a ticket to see the game. If I have to give up Starbuck's to afford my season ticket, I'll happily sacrifice the coffee. How many times have you struck up a conversation with someone just because you saw them drinking your favorite coffee? Probably never.

When die-hard NBA fans think about themselves, they often define themselves this way:

"I am a father, a brother, a son, a lawyer, and a die-hard Lakers fan who believes Kobe Bryant is God."

You know that person, right? The Lakers are just as important in identifying that guy as his name is. He has the license plate frame on his car, he has a 72" flat screen so he can watch NBA League Pass in Hi-Def, he has a framed Magic Johnson jersey in his living room (which his wife complains about constantly), and the mere mention of Chris Paul's MVP-worthy play is enough to make his blood boil. That guy is going to give up coffee, movies, and maybe even his children before he gives up his season tickets to see the Lakers.

You see, to our prototypical NBA fan, the Lakers are more than entertainment; they're part of who he is on a fundamental level. As much as anything else, he's a Lakers Fan.

Teams, it should be noted, also do their part to be valuable members of the societies in which they are located. We've seen that extensively with the way the New Orleans Hornets and Saints helped the people of New Orleans recover from Hurricane Katrina, and the way the Rockets have been working to help people in Houston recover from Hurricane Ike. So it truly works both ways.

It's naive, of course, to think that the current economic downturn won't eventually impact the NBA if allowed to continue. But it would also be a mistake to discount professional sports as mere entertainment. Not only is team association a huge part of the American psyche, but we will also turn to our favorite teams as a means to forget - even if only for a couple of hours - just how bad things might be outside those arena doors.


----Hoopsworld

perfect answer to the question.

me in a nutshell

lavis
09-26-2008, 01:56 AM
You better hope not, cause those russian billionaires don't give a **** about your depression or their teams budget. Meaning of course, that players would leave NBA for a team who's owner can throw that money at them.

BigEric
09-26-2008, 02:50 AM
I know this might seem farfetched, but do you guys think Childress sparked a problem for our economy. I know the Euro was currently killing the dollar, but since Childress signed with Greece or whatever, others have followed, and as a result our economy is out of shape. This may be a conspiracy, but I think it is a factor when it comes down to it.

Hellcrooner
09-26-2008, 02:51 AM
^ its a world recesion, no money no fans , no fans no incomings, and that includes those rich russians, they are not goign to thrwo away money if they cant get a beneift back.

lavis
09-26-2008, 05:53 AM
^ its a world recesion, no money no fans , no fans no incomings, and that includes those rich russians, they are not goign to thrwo away money if they cant get a beneift back.

They're already doing it. There are teams with tens of millions in losses.. Not only in Russia. And they would do it more if there were more NBA players available. Oil billionaires have no worries there. It's the average russian who takes the hit.

DLeeicious
09-26-2008, 09:30 AM
If I was in office and sports organizations were struggling I would propose a larger bailout than what's currently in process!