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View Full Version : Hawks match Grizzlies offer, re-sign Smith.



hockeypro68
08-08-2008, 10:57 PM
The wait is over, Hawks fans. I can report tonight that the Hawks have officially matched the offer sheet signed earlier this evening by Josh Smith with the Memphis Grizzlies, and Josh will remain in a Hawks uniform for next season and beyond.

Rick Sund spoke with me briefly just a moment ago to confirm, and had this to say:

"We are going to match the offer sheet, and Josh will continue to be a Hawk," said Sund. "We are glad to have this taken care of, and we are looking forward to training camp in October. In the meantime, we are continuing to work to improve our roster.

"I just spoke to Josh, and he is happy to get the process behind him and move forward. The bottom line was, we wanted to make a quick decision once the offer came through to show Josh that we want him to remain a Hawk."
http://hawks.portspaces.com/post/hawksbasketblog/hawks_resign_josh_smith.html


I don't think many people will be surprised by this... it'd have been pretty crazy if they didn't match. I like how they responded the same day he signed the offer sheet for Memphis. I'm glad he's staying on the East, the West doesnt need any more playoff contenders.

Ph1lly Diehard
08-08-2008, 11:09 PM
Grizzlies wouldn't have been a playoff contender THIS year regardless if they signed him or not..

However they would be another team on the rise

Yogi
08-08-2008, 11:12 PM
Darn, wanted him out of our division.

bball1217
08-08-2008, 11:13 PM
Good thing for the Hawks. :clap:

dodie53
08-08-2008, 11:21 PM
no surprise

knicks1214
08-08-2008, 11:25 PM
no surprise at all...shame smith is going to be pissed playing there as he clashes with the coach...

JOSETHEALLSTAR
08-08-2008, 11:30 PM
not suprised :]

hockeypro68
08-08-2008, 11:30 PM
Grizzlies wouldn't have been a playoff contender THIS year regardless if they signed him or not..

However they would be another team on the rise


OJ Mayo, Marc Gasol, Darrell Arthur, Jcritt, and JOSH SMITH would have improved the the team drastically. Milicic could break out this season, given a full time starting role. Who knows how good they could have been with Smith... a playoff appearance would not have been out of the question.

NYKnickFanatic
08-08-2008, 11:33 PM
Well, now that didnt take long, did it?

dawgsfan_45
08-08-2008, 11:35 PM
Wooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo oooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo

:D:rock::cheers:
:D:rock::cheers:
:D:rock::cheers:
:D:rock::cheers:
:D:rock::cheers:
:D:rock::cheers:
:D:rock::cheers:
:D:rock::cheers:
:D:rock::cheers:
:D:rock::cheers:
:D:rock::cheers:

NYKnickFanatic
08-08-2008, 11:35 PM
Can someone please explain something to me though.

Since the Hawks matched it, does that mean he HAS to sign with them?

Why couldnt he just sign with the Grizzlies, if he wanted too?

I never understood this.

dawgsfan_45
08-08-2008, 11:38 PM
Can someone please explain something to me though.

Since the Hawks matched it, does that mean he HAS to sign with them?

Why couldnt he just sign with the Grizzlies, if he wanted too?

I never understood this.

no, he doesnt have to he just wanted to...i think

TheHip
08-08-2008, 11:54 PM
He has to because he is a "restricted free agent" which means that his team has the right to match any offer, and he has no choice. He only has the option once he becomes an unrestricted free agent, which he would have been come season's end had he signed a qualifying offer for this season, however this wont be for a while now that he has a new contract...

DenButsu
08-08-2008, 11:59 PM
Since the Hawks matched it, does that mean he HAS to sign with them?

Why couldnt he just sign with the Grizzlies, if he wanted too?

Yes, he has to sign with Atlanta.

And the reason why is that he's a restricted free agent, which means that his team still has the right to retain him if he signs an offer sheet with another team (as he did with Memphis in this case) by matching that offer.

Basically, the team still has his rights. He can't just go sign with Memphis for the same reason that LeBron can't just go sign with the Nets right now. He's contractually obligated to remain with his team until his contract expires or he is traded.


Now, if he's super-pissed and wants to make trouble about it, he can "demand to be traded" by refusing to play, etc. It would then be up to Atlanta's front office and coaching staff to resolve that situation either by caving to his trade demands and finding a way to move him, or by just standing pat and letting him suffer.

superkegger
08-09-2008, 12:00 AM
I don't really get this. I mean was Smoove really thinking the hawks wouldn't give him a deal? Or did he actually think they wouldn't match? Deng gets 80, Okafor 72, and he only gets 58. I don't get why Josh would sign that offer sheet. :confused:

DenButsu
08-09-2008, 12:02 AM
nba salary cap faq (http://members.cox.net/lmcoon/salarycap.htm):


36. What is restricted free agency?

There are two types of free agency: unrestricted and restricted. An unrestricted free agent is free to sign with any other team, and there's nothing the player's original team can do to prevent it. Restricted free agency gives the player's original team the right to keep the player by matching an offer sheet the player signs with another team. This is called the "right of first refusal."

Restricted free agency exists only on a limited basis. It is allowed following the fourth year of rookie "scale" contracts for first-round draft picks (see question number 41). It is also allowed for all veteran free agents who have been in the league three or fewer seasons. However, a first round draft pick becomes an unrestricted free agent following his second or third season if his team does not exercise its option to extend the player's rookie scale contract for the next season. All other free agency is limited to unrestricted free agency.

In order to make their free agent a restricted free agent, a team must submit a qualifying offer to the player by June 30. This prevents the team from not offering a contract and waiting to swoop in when the player tries to sign elsewhere. The qualifying offer ensures that the team does not gain the right of first refusal without also offering a contract themselves. The amount of the qualifying offer for players on rookie "scale" contracts is based on the player's draft position (see question number 41). The qualifying offer for all other players must be for 125% of the player's previous salary, or the player's minimum salary (see question number 11) plus $175,000, whichever is greater. The qualifying offer must be for one season. A player can elect to accept his qualifying offer (the qualifying offer must be accepted by March 1) and play the following season under its terms. This is sometimes done in order to become an unrestricted free agent the following summer (see question number 38).

A qualifying offer cannot be accepted after March 1. Teams may place a shorter time limit on their qualifying offer, specifying any date between October 1 and March 1 by which it must be accepted. If the deadline passes and the qualifying offer is neither withdrawn nor accepted, then the player continues to be a restricted free agent. The team and player are also still free to negotiate a new contract after the qualifying offer ends -- the deadline only affects the player's ability to accept the qualifying offer.

Teams may also withdraw an outstanding qualifying offer in which case the player becomes unrestricted. This happened with Toronto and Keon Clark in 2002. The qualifying offer cannot be withdrawn after July 23 without the player's approval.

If the player is coming off the fourth year of his rookie scale contract, then in addition to a qualifying offer, his team can also submit a maximum qualifying offer. A maximum qualifying offer is for six seasons at the maximum salary with 10.5% annual raises. It can contain no options, ETOs or bonuses of any kind, and must be fully guaranteed. When a team submits a maximum qualifying offer (in essence "stepping up" with a maximum contract offer before the player even hits the market), it places a more stringent requirement on other teams' offer sheets (see below).

When another team wants to sign a restricted free agent, it signs the player to an offer sheet, the principal terms of which the original team is given seven days to match. The offer sheet must be for at least two seasons (not including option years). If the player's prior team also submitted a maximum qualifying offer, then the offer sheet must be for at least three seasons (not including option years). If the player's original team exercises its right of first refusal by matching the principal terms of the offer sheet, the player is then under contract to his original team. If the player's original team does not exercise its right of first refusal within seven days, the offer sheet becomes an official contract with the new team.

To summarize, a restricted free agent essentially has four options:

* He can accept his prior team's qualifying offer, play for one season, and become a free agent again the following summer.

* He can accept his prior team's maximum qualifying offer (if applicable, and if one has been submitted) and play under a long-term contract at the maximum salary.

* He can sign an offer sheet with another team, which his prior team is given the opportunity to match.

* He can negotiate a new contract with his prior team that is independent of the qualifying offer or maximum qualifying offer.

There are additional restrictions placed on offer sheets for players with one or two years in the league. These restrictions are described in question number 37.

There can be no compensation given to a team in return for their not matching an offer to a restricted free agent. For example, Houston could not sign Golden State's restricted free agent, then send Golden State a draft pick in exchange for their not matching the offer and retaining the player.

If the team matches an offer sheet, they cannot trade the player in a sign-and-trade arrangement (see question number 76).

A signed offer sheet can be rescinded within the seven day waiting period if all three parties (the player and the two teams) agree.

Dark Donnie
08-09-2008, 12:14 AM
So is he signed with Atlanta for 5 more years or just the one remaining?

superkegger
08-09-2008, 12:23 AM
So is he signed with Atlanta for 5 more years or just the one remaining?

6 more really. since he still has this next year, and then the new contract kicks in.

heyman321
08-09-2008, 12:34 AM
What an idiot he and his agent are. He got ripped off of maybe 20 million more dollars and he is CERTAINLY worth more than Deng, Okafor, and Iguodala.

Vidball
08-09-2008, 12:37 AM
Deng and Okafor both signed 6 year deals...that's why their $ is so much higher. Once you add in what Smith will be making in the first year of his next deal the money should pretty much be about what the other two are getting.

S.J.Basketball
08-09-2008, 12:38 AM
No shocker here. What would've been shocking is if Memphis actually got Josh Smith.

tonyd3b54
08-09-2008, 12:44 AM
idk nuch about the nba contractual rules... but if the griz decided they want to pay more could they offer another sheet at say like 68mil?

DenButsu
08-09-2008, 01:30 AM
idk nuch about the nba contractual rules... but if the griz decided they want to pay more could they offer another sheet at say like 68mil?


If the player's original team exercises its right of first refusal by matching the principal terms of the offer sheet, the player is then under contract to his original team. If the player's original team does not exercise its right of first refusal within seven days, the offer sheet becomes an official contract with the new team.

This to me suggests that once the player signs an offer sheet from another team, that's it, that's going to be his contract with either the new team or the original team. Unless:


A signed offer sheet can be rescinded within the seven day waiting period if all three parties (the player and the two teams) agree.

But I've never heard of that happening. And really, it wouldn't make any sense. Why would a team pitch an offer, sign a player to it, and then say, "Oh wait, no, scratch that."?

bogdanrom
08-09-2008, 01:36 AM
Doesn't this suck for Josh Smith. Can he not accept the Hawks' offer. Because if the Grizzlies didn't offer him that deal, he would have probably gotten more money from the Hawks.

Sixerlover
08-09-2008, 01:45 AM
You knew this was coming.

Sixerlover
08-09-2008, 01:46 AM
Doesn't this suck for Josh Smith. Can he not accept the Hawks' offer. Because if the Grizzlies didn't offer him that deal, he would have probably gotten more money from the Hawks.
Nope. He shouldn't of accepted the Grizzles lowball offer.

His mistake.

FNM BOY
08-09-2008, 01:50 AM
I still think he will asked to be traded.

Dirty Dirk41
08-09-2008, 01:51 AM
Nope. He shouldn't of accepted the Grizzles lowball offer.

His mistake.

lol...Its funny a young man is about to make 58 million dollars and wering saying hes getting lowballed....lol...


Im pretty sure Josh Smith will do just fine with 58 million.

bogdanrom
08-09-2008, 01:53 AM
lol...Its funny a young man is about to make 58 million dollars and wering saying hes getting lowballed....lol...


Im pretty sure Josh Smith will do just fine with 58 million.

I know. That's a lot of money but he could have gotten higher because the Hawks couldn't afford losing him.

Sixerlover
08-09-2008, 01:58 AM
lol...Its funny a young man is about to make 58 million dollars and wering saying hes getting lowballed....lol...


Im pretty sure Josh Smith will do just fine with 58 million.

Because in the NBA it isn't about money, it's about how much you make compared to your competition. That contract isn't close to the level of Deng's, Jefferson's, or what Iguodala's will be. That was a bad move by his GM to settle for the first contract thrown at him. Although he is making more than Kevin Martin if I'm not mistaken.

Dirty Dirk41
08-09-2008, 02:04 AM
Because in the NBA it isn't about money, it's about how much you make compared to your competition. That contract isn't close to the level of Deng's, Jefferson's, or what Iguodala's will be. That was a bad move by his GM to settle for the first contract thrown at him. Although he is making more than Kevin Martin if I'm not mistaken.

haha i dont really give a ****. im dead broke while rich prick is worrying about an extra 20 million. I was shocked it was only 58 million myself. Deng is nice but he should never make more than Josh Smith.

Bg7getclutch
08-09-2008, 08:58 AM
how much is he getting paid?

DenButsu
08-09-2008, 09:05 AM
how much is he getting paid?

58/5
http://sports.espn.go.com/nba/news/story?id=3525609

Dark Donnie
08-09-2008, 12:51 PM
You hear rumblings about him not wanting to stay and him having issues with the coach and yet he resigns for this amount....odd move.

_Sn1P3r_
08-09-2008, 10:47 PM
It was ATL who decided to match the offer though. So I think Smith had no choice. Correct me if I'm wrong.

dawgsfan_45
08-10-2008, 12:20 AM
You hear rumblings about him not wanting to stay and him having issues with the coach and yet he resigns for this amount....odd move.

rumbles = rumors. he says he is happy to stay