PDA

View Full Version : Tips for Pitching



True LA FAN
07-15-2008, 03:40 PM
Hi, im 14 years old, almost 15, and i pitch for a small little town in South Dakota and i can pitch around 60 mph and i throw about 15 balls out of about 75 pitches a game..i dont throw a lot of balls. I also just pitch all fastballs. Could i have some pointers on how to pitch faster. My goal is to pitch someday in the major leagues! Thanks.

TrueBlue#21
07-15-2008, 04:14 PM
Im also a pitcher and im almost 17. To pitch fast, you have to have strong legs. Most pitchers get their velocity from the strength that they have in their legs/lower body. That's why you see pitchers like Jonathan Broxton throw up to 100 MPH because of the amount of strength that he has in his legs. I would also start throwing off speed pitches. Your almost 15 and probably in high school, and its important to change speeds to keep hitters on their toes. you dont necessarily have to throw amazing curveballs, knuckle balls, or sliders etc. If you have a successful changeup, you can save your arm from injury and still be a good pitcher (look at Mark Berlhe of the white sox, he doesnt throw hard but he is successful). Try throwing a two seam fastball. it has movement and it could be successful and it could be used instead of a slider/cutter. I recently suffered a rotator cuff injury and i too have the dream of playing in college/majors. I started throwing curveballs/off speed pitches at a young age and i put alot of stress on my arm....

So to throw harder, you should work out in the gym. Work on your abs, shoulders, and make sure you have strong, big legs. Dont emphasize so much on muscles, just make sure that your physically fit and you have great lower body strength.

4everblue
07-15-2008, 04:49 PM
Broxton gets his strength from him belly... It's a physics thing...

Now being serious, the first thing you need to work on is on location and control, and not on offspeed pitches. That's the main error young pitchers do, to start with the curve and slider at a young age. Those pitches put so much stress on your arm that you will be injured and worthless at 20. Wait until you are 18 to start with the curve and slider, because your arm will be a lot more developed. I like the 2 seamer idea.

I'm not so sure if 60mph at age 15 is really amazing. But the most important thing is control. Lots of young pitchers get to the minor and never make it to the majors cuz they dont know where the pitch will end up. Work on the corners and dont be afraid to pitch inside to a hitter. Worst thing that can happen is to hit him and then the game will be much more fun for the fans...

Tymathee
07-15-2008, 04:58 PM
I agree. I'm a big pitching advocate and can throw many pitches but my bread and butter was my fastball.

If you look at all the best prospects that come up, yeah they can throw fast but the best ones out there can pin point that fastball anywhere they want.

Look at greg maddox, never over 92mph but because it has movement (2-seamer) and he can place it anywhere around the plate he was nearly impossible to hit off of.

Here's a website of different pitching grips that you can use.

http://www.thecompletepitcher.com/pitching_grips.htm

It has these tips on there

* How to grip and throw a four-seam fastball
* How to grip and throw a two-seam fastball
* How to grip and throw a three-finger changeup
* How to grip and throw a circle changeup
* How to grip and throw a palmball (palm ball)
* How to grip and throw a beginners curveball
* How to grip and throw a straight curveball
* How to grip and throw a knuckle curveball
* How to grip and throw a slider
* How to grip and throw a split-finger fastball

I suggest you learn the four-steam, two-seam, three-finger changeup, circle change (my favorite) palm ball (2nd favorite) and maybe the split-finger and sinker as they're both fastballs essentially but have dip.

Trust me, at your age, if you can throw strikes and a good change up you will be gold, especially since most young players can't hit change-ups well (I know i couldn't!) wait until college or so to develop a curve ball, it's a pretty tough pitch to master and took me about 5-6 years before i was confident i could throw it correctly but I could do nearly everything else but a slider and knuckle ball.

If you need anymore help, don't hesitate to e-mail me @ tymathee@gmail.com.

True LA FAN
07-15-2008, 05:22 PM
hey thanks everyone for the tips

dusto_magnifico
07-15-2008, 06:23 PM
Broxton gets his strength from him belly... It's a physics thing...

Now being serious, the first thing you need to work on is on location and control, and not on offspeed pitches. That's the main error young pitchers do, to start with the curve and slider at a young age. Those pitches put so much stress on your arm that you will be injured and worthless at 20. Wait until you are 18 to start with the curve and slider, because your arm will be a lot more developed. I like the 2 seamer idea.

I'm not so sure if 60mph at age 15 is really amazing. But the most important thing is control. Lots of young pitchers get to the minor and never make it to the majors cuz they dont know where the pitch will end up. Work on the corners and dont be afraid to pitch inside to a hitter. Worst thing that can happen is to hit him and then the game will be much more fun for the fans...

I'm not so sure if you know what an "off-speed" pitch is, but my main definition of an off speed pitch is a change up. Learn to locate an outside change on the corner and how to hit the inside corner with the heat on the very next pitch and your set. learn to move the ball in and out, up and down whenever you want.

butterfingers37
07-15-2008, 09:49 PM
You might want to try this forum: http://www.baseball-fever.com/forumdisplay.php?f=53

Also, I thought I read somewhere that long toss helps with arm strength and it's more about flexibility with your muscles than mass.

N.Z's #1 Dodger
07-15-2008, 10:28 PM
Review Brett Tomko tapes. And do the total opposite.

THINKBLUE15
07-16-2008, 12:19 AM
^^
Lmfao!!!

southerndodgerf
07-16-2008, 02:02 AM
Three pieces of advice

A. Do NOT throw a slider until you are 19.
B. Learn a 12-6. It has the same motion as a fastball (overhead with break), it is simple, and it is effective.
C. Do not try to throw hard. Simply throw. Whomever suggested long tosses was right.

butterfingers37
07-16-2008, 02:09 AM
C. Do not try to throw hard. Simply throw. Whomever suggested long tosses was right.

Cool, I thought I was going to be wrong. I never played ball growing up and didn't want to ill-informed advice.

southerndodgerf
07-16-2008, 02:12 AM
Cool, I thought I was going to be wrong. I never played ball growing up and didn't want to ill-informed advice.

No, you improve your arm strength and muscle memory by simply tossing and then moving back and so on and so on. The pros still do it. Further, it allows your arm to gain muscle mass slowly.

Most people believe that while working out you make muscle. This is NOT true. You gain muscle on your rest days. That is why ALL athletes take a day off of working on--most two. The rest days allow the muscle to build.

southerndodgerf
07-16-2008, 02:13 AM
Oh and let me add one thing. If you are going to work out, ask someone who knows how. You can do more harm than good going in blind. Ask about targeting muscle groups and which ones you can rotate.

BlueZoo
07-16-2008, 09:42 AM
Guys, you can't get what you need to do to improve on a website, reading it in a place where most people disagree all year on practically everything.
Go out there and physically get a person to watch you pitch and ask them to critique your mechanics first of all...a coach, an older player who knows what's up- try to get to a BB camp if possible, if you're that serious. Put your trust in someone you believe in.
The 25 suggestions to do this and that and learn this and that is the worst thing that you can subscribe to at this point. Don't fill your head with mush and listen to people who have never physically seen you throw.

And GOOD LUCK>

SDDodger
07-16-2008, 10:57 AM
First of all welcome to the boards. I love to see young men taking an interest in baseball.

AS to throwing harder, it is impossible for anyone to say what is the key to you throwing harder. The biggest thing for most young pitchers is mechanics. Learning proper repeatable mechanics will do wonders for velocity. You may already have good mechanics but it is hard for us to tell without a video or seeing you live.

The next thing is playing lots of long toss. It will help strengthen your arm tremendously if done regularly. As far as working out goes, to increase velocity you want to increase your core strength. You don't want to lift real heavy weights, you want to maintain your flexibility and bulking up is counterproductive. You also want to do light dumbell work to strengthen you rotater cuff, this promotes arm health.

Now as to throwing 65 MPH at 15. This may be really good in a small town in South Dakota, but in socal it is not unusual to see a 14 year old hitting 80+. Most good travel ball pitchers are hitting 75 regularly. Don't however let that discourage you, kids develop at a different rate. Most of the kids in California also have had the advantage of playing year round, so they have had more of an opportunity to fine tune their mechanics. The most important thing is, if playing beyond high school is your dream then continue to work hard and develop.

4everblue
07-16-2008, 11:46 AM
I'm not so sure if you know what an "off-speed" pitch is, but my main definition of an off speed pitch is a change up. Learn to locate an outside change on the corner and how to hit the inside corner with the heat on the very next pitch and your set. learn to move the ball in and out, up and down whenever you want.

Yeah, I guess I used it on the wrong way. I really meant curve and slider, not changeup.

old blue
07-16-2008, 12:00 PM
There is an old baseball saying about pitching --"throw strikes, change speeds and work fast"


Let your fastball be your foundation. YOu must be able to throw it for a strike whenever you need to. Experiment with different grips to develop movement on the ball. A straight fastball is just bp. Learn to throw the change. Use the same number of seams as you do with your fast ball. ie. if you throw mostly a 2 seem fastball , use a 2 seem change. as you climb the ladder, the hitters can tell the difference.. Develop strong legs and core strenght. Lastly, have fun pitching--- remember what works for you and learn from both your successes and failures. Best of luck!!!!

Az_Dodgers_Fan
07-16-2008, 02:03 PM
this may be bad advice because its a curve ball, but I remember hearing that for Koufax they put a bucket on home plate and got him to throw his curves into the bucket. thats why it was so amazing or something like that. if this is a bad idea for a kid please someone say it. I never pitched so I have no idea whats good or bad for them at that age.

dusto_magnifico
07-16-2008, 02:40 PM
Yeah, I guess I used it on the wrong way. I really meant curve and slider, not changeup.

OK good. Then I definitely agree. A slider and curve are the killers of young arms. It happened to me personally and 2 of my teammates. Furthermore, trying to throw hard has similar effects on a young mans arm. The most important things right now for this young man are location and being able to mix up the change and fast ball.