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  1. #1
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    Boston Red Sox Transactions 2018

    Red Sox signed INF Ivan DeJesus Jr. to a minor league contract.

    DeJesus spent the entire 2017 season with the Triple-A affiliate of the Brewers, posting an impressive .345/.407/.488 batting line with seven home runs and 65 RBI in 112 games. He played eight games with the Red Sox back in 2012 after being acquired as part of the Adrian Gonzalez trade.
    roto

  2. #2
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    Not technically a Red Sox transaction but...

    Daniel Bard has retired from baseball.

    Bard was a first-round pick of the Red Sox back in 2006 and he pitched well out of Boston's bullpen over his first three major league seasons (2009-2011), but the 32-year-old right-hander's last appearance at baseball's highest level came in 2013. He allowed 14 earned runs in 9 1/3 innings between minor league affiliates of the Cardinals and Mets in 2017.
    roto

  3. #3
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    Red Sox and RHP Carson Smith avoided arbitration by agreeing to a one-year, $850,000 contract.

    Smith returned from Tommy John reconstructive elbow surgery late last season and posted a sharp 1.35 ERA in eight relief appearances before working 1 1/3 scoreless innings in the ALDS against the Astros. He'll work in a setup role in 2018 in front of Red Sox closer Craig Kimbrel.
    roto

  4. #4
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    Depth signing alert

    Red Sox signed C Oscar Hernandez to a minor league contract with an invitation to spring training.

    Hernandez spent all of last season at Double-A in the Diamondbacks organization, hitting only .197/.257/.348 over 255 plate appearances. The former Rule 5 pick is merely a depth guy.
    roto

  5. #5
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    Red Sox and OF Jackie Bradley avoided arbitration by agreeing to a one-year, $6.1 million contract.
    Bradley was arbitration-eligible for the second time. He hit .245/.323/.402 with 17 homers last season.
    Source: Robert Murray

  6. #6
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    ICYMI, the Sox signed like half their team over the weekend.

    Red Sox and C Christian Vazquez avoided arbitration by agreeing to a one-year, $1.425 million contract.

    Vazquez was arbitration-eligible for the first time. The young catcher sported a .290/.330/.404 batting line with five home runs last season.
    Red Sox and SS Xander Bogaerts avoided arbitration by agreeing to a one-year, $7.05 million contract.

    Bogaerts was eligible for arbitration for the second time this offseason. The young shortstop hit a disappointing .273/.343/.403 in 2017 while playing through a hand injury.
    Red Sox and LHP Eduardo Rodriguez avoided arbitration by agreeing to a one-year, $2.375 million contract.

    Rodriguez was eligible for arbitration for the first time as a Super 2 qualifier. The southpaw held a 4.19 ERA across 137 1/3 innings in 2017 and will get a late start to 2018 following October knee surgery.
    Red Sox and C Sandy Leon avoided arbitration by agreeing to a one-year, $1.95 million contract.

    It's the first time he's been eligible for arbitration. Leon put up a .225/.290/.354 batting line with seven longballs last season.
    Red Sox and RHP Brandon Workman avoided arbitration by agreeing to a one-year, $835,000 contract.

    It's the righty's first year of arbitration eligibility. Workman held a 3.18 ERA over 33 relief appearances for Boston in 2017.
    Red Sox and LHP Drew Pomeranz avoided arbitration by agreeing to a one-year, $8.5 million contract.

    It's Pomeranz's final year of arbitration eligibility. The left-hander posted a 3.32 ERA across 32 starts for the Red Sox last season.
    Red Sox and INF/OF Brock Holt avoided arbitration by agreeing to a one-year, $2.225 million contract.

    It's Holt's second year of arbitration eligibility. He hit .200/.305/.243 in 2017 over 64 games in a season shortened by concussion and vertigo issues.
    Red Sox and RHP Joe Kelly avoided arbitration by agreeing to a one-year, $3.825 million contract.

    Kelly was in his final year of arbitration eligibility. He put up a 2.79 ERA across 54 relief appearances last season.
    All via roto

  7. #7
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    Source: Scott Lauber

  8. #8
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    All pretty standard. Vazquez might be the best deal of the bunch.
    I am not a con artist! I am a businessman! I have a big brain and I'm good at making deals! People are just jealous of my BIG BRAIN! BAD!

    Guess who? The future X-Presdent...

  9. #9
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    According to Buster Olney of ESPN, Boston's five-year offer to J.D. Martinez is worth "in the range of" $100 million.
    That explains why the marriage hasn't happened yet, as Martinez and his agent Scott Boras are said to be looking for a seven-year contract worth between $180 million and $210 million. There's talk that the 30-year-old free agent slugger might hold out into spring training to get closer to what he wants financially. Martinez batted .303/.376/.690 with 45 home runs and 104 RBI in 119 games last season between the Tigers and Diamondbacks.
    Source: Buster Olney

  10. #10
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    Mookie Betts won his arbitration case against the Red Sox and will earn a $10.5 million salary in 2018.

    Boston offered Betts a $7.5 million salary when arbitration figures were filed earlier this month. At a hearing Tuesday the panel sided with the 25-year-old outfielder's request. $10.5 million is close to a first-year arbitration record, falling just shy of the $10.85 million salary Kris Bryant commanded from the Cubs a couple weeks ago. Betts tallied 24 home runs, 102 RBI, 26 stolen bases, and 101 runs scored in 153 games last season. He's a top-five fantasy stud.
    roto

  11. #11
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    The Sox were so not in the right letting Mookie go into that hearing...

    I hope that doesn't come back to bite us in the butt.

    Sent from my SM-G935V using Tapatalk

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Allen View Post
    The Sox were so not in the right letting Mookie go into that hearing...

    I hope that doesn't come back to bite us in the butt.

    Sent from my SM-G935V using Tapatalk

    The Red Sox are in the luxury tax danger zone

    According to Cot's Baseball Contracts, the Red Sox have a $205.2 million payroll for luxury tax purposes in 2018 after Betts' arbitration win. That includes estimates for players in their pre-arbitration years, and players on the 40-man roster but not in the big leagues. It does not include midseason additions. Every player who gets called up from the minors or acquired at the trade deadline counts against the luxury tax payroll.

    The luxury tax threshold is $197 million this coming season and, realistically, there's no way for the Red Sox to get under the threshold. Not unless they find someone to take Hanley Ramirez's entire contract, or do something crazy like salary-dump Craig Kimbrel. They're paying luxury this year. The question is how much? Because the more they go over, the harder they get hit. Here are the luxury tax tiers Boston, a first-time offender, is facing:

    $197 million to $217 million payroll: 20 percent tax on overage
    $217 million to $237 million payroll: 32 percent on overage plus first-round draft pick moves back 10 spots
    $237 million payroll and above: 62.5 percent on overage plus first-round draft pick moves back 10 spots

    The Red Sox are at $205.2 million, so they're in the first tier. If they were, however, to sign a big bat like J.D. Martinez, it would surely push them up into the second tier, raising their tax rate and pushing back their first-round pick.

    Losing to Betts in arbitration probably won't be the difference between staying in the first tier and jumping into the second if the Red Sox sign Martinez or a comparable free agent, but it is $3 million in real money. It's more than that, really, since the team has to pay luxury tax on that $3 million.
    Arbitration hearings don't have to create bad blood

    By and large, arbitration hearings are an unpleasant experience. The player sits in a room and listens to his team detail his shortcomings, explaining why he should receive a lower salary than he feels he deserves. It can create some animosity, for sure. I'll always remember what Vinnie Pestano told MLB.com's Jordan Bastian about his arbitration hearing experience:

    "You're being honest and accountable and saying the right things and being there," Pestano said, "and then later you find your own words in the paper, and somebody is trying to use your words against you to drive your value down. Whether that played a big role in the decision, I don't know.

    "That was the only thing that I didn't care for. I definitely think it'll affect how I see things going forward. I don't really know if I can be as honest and up-front anymore. I've got three more years of arbitration left. I don't know what they'll pick to use against me next year or two years from now."

    As unpleasant as the arbitration hearing might be, it doesn't automatically have to create bad blood between the team and player. Last year Dellin Betances and the Yankees went to a hearing, and after the Yankees won, team president Randy Levine infamously ripped Betances on a conference call with reporters. This year Betances and the Yankees hammered out a contract before the arbitration salary filing deadline, so last year's hearing didn't stand in the way of a deal this year. The Yankees also went to arbitration hearings with Derek Jeter and Mariano Rivera over the years. Their relationships survived.

    Betts is, obviously, a core member of the Red Sox and they don't want to upset him. I imagine some fans are worried the arbitration hearing created some bad blood and might push Betts to sign with another team when he becomes a free agent in three years. It could happen. That's part of the risk. The hearing does not necessarily mean the two sides are on bad terms, however. It is part of the business and both the Red Sox and Betts will work together to maintain a good relationship long-term.
    Sabermetrics making way into the arbitration process?
    MLB: Kansas City Royals at Boston Red Sox
    Mookie Betts' defense might have been rewarded in arbitration. USATSI

    The arbitration process is archaic. Old school stats typically reign supreme. Wins, saves, RBI, so on and so forth. That stuff pays. That's why one-dimensional sluggers always do well in arbitration. They rack up homers and RBI, but deficiencies in their on-base percentage and defense don't hurt them.

    Betts' win might be a sign the tide is changing. There are guidelines in the collective bargaining agreement about what stats are and are not allowed in hearings. Publicly available stats like those used by FanGraphs and Baseball Prospectus are allowed. Statcast data, curiously, is not.

    As I mentioned before, Betts now has the second-highest salary for a first-year arbitration salary, between Bryant and Howard. Consider their career offensive numbers going into their first arbitration year:

    Betts: .292/.351/.488 (120 OPS+) with 78 homers and 310 RBI
    Bryant: .288/.388/.527 (142 OPS+) with 94 homers and 294 RBI
    Howard: .291/.397/.610 (151 OPS+) with 129 home runs and 353 RBI

    Betts was an objectively inferior hitter to Bryant and Howard at the same point of their careers. Both Bryant and Howard had a Rookie of the Year and an MVP award to their credit as well, remember. Betts had neither.

    And yet, Betts still won the hearing and received a huge first-year arbitration salary. Did he and his agent successfully argue their case using his defensive stats? Some 2015-17 defensive numbers for Betts:

    Defensive Runs Saved: +64 (3rd among all players, 2nd among outfielders, 1st among right fielders)
    Ultimate Zone Rating: +36.6 (7th among all players, 4th among outfielders, 2nd among right fielders)
    Defensive WAR: +6.9 (6th among all players, 3rd among outfielders, 1st among right fielders)

    Betts has very good offensive numbers, no doubt about it, but he is a premium defender. One of the best in baseball at any position. DRS, UZR and dWAR are all publicly available too. They're admissible in an arbitration hearing.

    Based on his offensive numbers, Mookie's performance isn't on par with the two other players who received $10 million-plus in their first arbitration year. Add in his defense though, and Betts is worthy of that salary. His hearing win could be a sign players with lots of defensive value are finally going to get their due during the arbitration process.

  13. #13
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    Tell that to Bradley who got 4.4 million less than Mookie. Who's the better defender ?
    "Just because the path is well beaten. That doesn't mean it's the right way to go"

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by johnny ny View Post
    Based on his offensive numbers, Mookie's performance isn't on par with the two other players who received $10 million-plus in their first arbitration year. Add in his defense though, and Betts is worthy of that salary. His hearing win could be a sign players with lots of defensive value are finally going to get their due during the arbitration process.
    First off, wow, this is one of the most intelligent posts I've seen. I definitely didn't expect it based on what you've posted in the past.

    It's an interesting comparison that you pointed out. The Betts/Bryant thing has been floating around a bit but I hadn't thought about Howard. It's definitely a time of transition. One of the factors is age; the Betts/Bryant thing is a tip in the direction of value for younger players. I know that agents have used age in the past; the fact that Betts and Bryant had 4+ years helped them both in relationship to Howard.

    Quote Originally Posted by JackB View Post
    Tell that to Bradley who got 4.4 million less than Mookie. Who's the better defender ?
    He was pretty specifically focused on Betts, Bryant, and Howard and explaining how the gap may have closed among them. However, consider that when Bradley was awarded $3.6M for 2017 he was a .237/.316/.409 career hitter with a cumulative 40HR and 170RBI over parts of 4 seasons. Even his spectacular hitting streak in the 2016 season left him with a .267/.349/.486 slash and 25HR because he was equally streaky in the cold direction. Considering how low the lows could be, it was a nice reward for a primarily defensive player.

    There's also one very important point: JBJ avoided arbitration last year and this. His salaries don't really say much about the value of defense in arbitration.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by RedSoxtober View Post
    First off, wow, this is one of the most intelligent posts I've seen. I definitely didn't expect it based on what you've posted in the past.

    It's an interesting comparison that you pointed out. The Betts/Bryant thing has been floating around a bit but I hadn't thought about Howard. It's definitely a time of transition. One of the factors is age; the Betts/Bryant thing is a tip in the direction of value for younger players. I know that agents have used age in the past; the fact that Betts and Bryant had 4+ years helped them both in relationship to Howard.
    Pretty sure he copy pasted an article...

    Notice the “Sabermetrics making way into the arbitration process?
    MLB: Kansas City Royals at Boston Red Sox
    Mookie Betts' defense might have been rewarded in arbitration. USATSI” in the middle.

    Good article, needs to be cited, definitely not an original post...

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