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  1. #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by Joemoes View Post
    Did you know in addition to that he probably had the best equipment and lessons. My family was middle class to above middle class and I took a stick and hit beans to work on hand eye coordination. But I still had great equipment. You can't become a pro baseball player in the states hitting with a stick and rocks in the back yard
    Bryce Harper grew up poor.

    He just played against his big brother and his parents saved up so he could play on traveling teams with Bryan.....and then Bryce started getting better than these very good kids 3-4 years older than him.

    We are talking about playing as a child. Like ages 5-13 or so. Once you start entering high school age, you need more refined training. Which you can get on the local public high schools baseball team. Kind of like Pine Bluff high school, where Torii Hunter went, or Henry County high school where Jason Heyward went.

  2. #62
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    Quote Originally Posted by Joemoes View Post
    Did you know in addition to that he probably had the best equipment and lessons. My family was middle class to above middle class and I took a stick and hit beans to work on hand eye coordination. But I still had great equipment. You can't become a pro baseball player in the states hitting with a stick and rocks in the back yard
    I guess I have bad news for you, because there are several guys in the hall of fame who learned how to play baseball that way.

    Pedro Jaime Martínez was born on October 25, 1971, in Manoguayabo, Dominican Republic. The fifth of six children, he grew up in a cramped one-room house near the capital city of Santo Domingo. The Martínez boys loved baseball, but the lack of money for proper equipment forced them to use rolled-up socks and the heads of their sisters' dolls for balls.
    https://www.biography.com/people/ped...C3%ADnez-37615


    His story is no longer unique or rare, but instead quite common.

    Vlad Guerrero?
    Growing up, his sister had to literally leave to help another family so they didn't have to feed her.
    http://www.jockbio.com/Bios/Vlad/Vlad_bio.html
    Although his town was not known for producing great ball players, baseball was part of the rhythm of life in Nizao Bani. The game was contested with a lemon or lime rolled up in old socks, a guava tree limb for a bat, and fielders gloves made of milk cartons. From the age of five, Vladimir was on the field with the big kids. He was always one of the better hitters.

    The kids of Nizao Bani enjoyed a form of baseball known as La Placa. Home was a license plate, and a batter had to keep his bat touching the dish until the pitcher released the ball. This made Vladimir a great low ball hitter.


    Do you understand how common this story is for guys sitting in the hall? I feel I could google the biography of basically any Hall of Famer from the Dominican and it's going to be similar.


    This sport does not require money. It requires unique and special skills, as well the ability to learn and adapt. But if the game doesn't interest you, it doesn't interest you.

    It also helps to be in the right place at the right time, or to get that right coach that that player uniquely needed. But we don't see a lack of black athletes in baseball because of money. It's because the sport doesn't interest them.

    It takes longer to get paid in the NFL and NBA in America than it does in the MLB. Yet both of those sports see more black athletes than baseball. Football is insanely expensive to play, much more so than baseball. Yet, how many brought up poor black halfbacks exist today?


    If baseball interests you, you'll find a way to play. There aren't inner city kids standing around with nothing to do on a saturday and then picking up the basketball because they can play that because nobody knows how to roll up a sock and make it into a baseball.

  3. #63
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    Quote Originally Posted by thefeckcampaign View Post
    As someone who has taught swimming for over 30yrs, I have noted there tends to be more difficulty for black people, males especially, to float. Now if they are overweight, regardless of the race, it doesn't apply. But if they are relatively in shape, black people's bottom end tend to not be as buoyant as other races overall and an over amount of compensation needs to done in order for floating on their back to be accomplished. Even with that compensation, there is no guarantee it'll be accomplished.

    Is that racism because it is negative? If you are going to state something like you did, which I am perfectly fine with, it has to go both ways in my opinion.
    I am a pretty advanced swimmer but my white *** can't float either.

  4. #64
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    Quote Originally Posted by mudvayne387 View Post
    Sorry for the **** post but as I was struggling to fall asleep last night it dawned on me that there are no African American catchers in baseball.
    Its shocking that people forget about Russell Martin, a 4 time all star.

  5. #65
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    I don't think it's that shocking. He's not exactly your prototypical black athlete.

  6. #66
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    I don't see what being "prototypical" has to do with anything. If a dude is black, he's black.

    Whats your "prototypical" white guy? Blond hair blue eyed dudes only?

  7. #67
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    I would venture to guess there are enough people that look at Russell Martin and don't even know he's black.

  8. #68
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    Quote Originally Posted by WOwolfOL View Post
    I am a pretty advanced swimmer but my white *** can't float either.
    I'd have to see you to know why.
    Quote Originally Posted by Crucis View Post
    Parity is about equality of opportunity, not equality of results.

  9. #69
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    Quote Originally Posted by One Nut Kruk View Post
    I would venture to guess there are enough people that look at Russell Martin and don't even know he's black.
    no idea.
    Baseball Maverick: How Sandy Alderson Revolutionized Baseball and Revived the Mets
    I am that Daddy Cool

  10. #70
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    Quote Originally Posted by One Nut Kruk View Post
    I would venture to guess there are enough people that look at Russell Martin and don't even know he's black.
    Not a catcher, but the same would be true of Aaron Judge

    but also raises the question, same one people had/have with Obama
    Why is a person with a black parent and a white parent usually identified as black anyway?
    Last edited by SiteWolf; 08-06-2017 at 05:47 PM.
    gotta love 'referential' treatment

  11. #71
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    Quote Originally Posted by SiteWolf View Post
    Not a catcher, but the same would be true of Aaron Judge

    but also raises the question, same one people had/have with Obama
    Why is a person with a black parent and a white parent usually identified as black anyway?
    Tiger Woods' dad was a black American, mother was Thai. People over here considered him Thai.
    "They throw the ball, I hit it. They hit the ball, I catch it." - Willie Mays

  12. #72
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    Quote Originally Posted by SiteWolf View Post
    Not a catcher, but the same would be true of Aaron Judge

    but also raises the question, same one people had/have with Obama
    Why is a person with a black parent and a white parent usually identified as black anyway?
    Derek Jeter.
    Baseball Maverick: How Sandy Alderson Revolutionized Baseball and Revived the Mets
    I am that Daddy Cool

  13. #73
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    Quote Originally Posted by SiteWolf View Post
    Not a catcher, but the same would be true of Aaron Judge

    but also raises the question, same one people had/have with Obama
    Why is a person with a black parent and a white parent usually identified as black anyway?
    History.

    Back in the day they would've been treated as full blooded slaves.

    Back in the day they wouldn't have been permitted to play major league baseball. For example, Roy Campanella's dad was white. But no team would have signed him prior to Jackie Robinson breaking the color line.

    Call it the unwritten rule in America. If you ain't all white, you're black.

    Maybe some day such things won't matter.
    "Ain't got the call no more. Got a lot of sinful idears – but they seem kinda sensible...."

  14. #74
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    Quote Originally Posted by fanofclendennon View Post
    Call it the unwritten rule in America. If you ain't all white, you're black.

    Maybe some day such things won't matter.
    Let's hope we see it in our lifetime.
    Quote Originally Posted by Crucis View Post
    Parity is about equality of opportunity, not equality of results.

  15. #75
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    Quote Originally Posted by metswon69 View Post
    Lack of participation among African Americans in youth baseball leagues. I mean just 8% of MLB players are black so that means roughly there are 69 African American players (55 position players, 14 pitchers) in all of MLB.

    I'm sure part of it is also stereotyping. Baseball leagues are usually run by a lot of middle aged white guys (not just on the professional level) who put black players in the OF because they tend to be better athletes. It sounds horrible but then you look at it and 42 of the 55 African American position players in MLB are OFs.

    Things will change. A lot of inner city kids were strictly playing football and basketball for years but that dynamic is going to shift now with all the guaranteed money in MLB and what is happening with CTE in relation to organized football.
    In America mind condition terms its only 8pct ''black''(legal status means dead), but in true actually factual all those so called Dominican Republic and so on come from Dark hue/African/Aborigines which is called in todays world(especially America) ''black''

    for instance in China some are called blacks because of poor status, same as in Russia and other places,

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