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  1. #466
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    The North Shore of O'ahu Hawaii
    Posts
    2,255
    Quote Originally Posted by Wolfe-Raider View Post
    S&B760, How 'bout that missile warning this morning? Scary I bet. What did you do?
    I just moved to Waikiki from Oahu's north shore. I was at my girls house, home alone because she went to work early. She's a nurse at Kapiolani hospital. I was drinking coffee and was reading about the Raiders when my phone buzzed. No matter, thought it was just a high surf and small craft advisory. I was wrong. I got a message saying an ICBM (Intercontinental Ballistic Missile) was headed for Hawaii. It wasnt a drill. Next thing I know, I hear my girls neighbor freaking out over the same message. My first call went to Mom. I got a voicemail. I said goodbye. I told her I loved her. I Couldnt believe I was leaving a message. I frantically tried calling her back. Nope. Phones went down. Fast busy signal. I called my girl. I managed to get through. I told her I loved her. She told me she loved me. She went back to work while trying to focus on frantic and panicking patients. I sat in her house for 30 minutes. The longest and strangest 30 minutes of my life, firmly believing it was over. I sat there in the eerie silence of a city that should be bustling. No car horns. No cars in her neighborhood. Nobody outdoors. Just the company of silence and my thoughts. My life flashed. Holy ****, did it flash. My thoughts flutteted between family, friends, unaccomplished life goals and what I had accomplished in my life. The truth was very clear and very real. I got my first update that it was a false alarm from twitter. I was confused. No confirmation was received from the Department of Defense. Phones were still down. Finally, I received confirmation from the DOD it was a false alarm. I went to work. I cleared my head by diving. Im blessed to be a dive instructor in paradise. I got to dive with a bunch of strangers. They had my back underwater. I had theirs. It was a soothing escape that we all needed. The dive rewarded us with an endangered Hawaiian Monk seal. Further clearing our heads from a much needed escape from reality above the surface. I went home. I hugged my girl harder than I ever have. I told her I loved her. I called my Mom. The call went through. I Told her I loved her and my family. My girl and I went and grabbed a beer. Many people were out. Waikiki is a melting pot of cultures and races. Unity was as common as aloha. People were extra kind to one another.

    We went to bed. My phone rang at 3:30a.m. I was in terror.

    Not again.

    Nope. It was an email notification ring. Edgy.

    Guys, all I can say is the experience changed my life. It widened my eyes and opened my heart to kindness for all of humanity. Love your family and friends like there is no tomorrow.

    There just may not be.

    Aloha ke akua.

    - Loren (slvr&blck760)
    "We don't take what the defense gives us; we take whatever the hell we want." - Al Davis

    ONE NATION, DOMINATION, RAIDER NATION!

  2. #467
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Still1Ballin's basement
    Posts
    26,510
    Awesome read, much Love Brother. Glad it was a false alarm like wow something like that would make me freak out too, my family means the world to me like all of my Raiders Brothers. Couldnít imagine that experience but you wrote it so well, felt like I was there for a second. Iíll walk a little slower tomorrow, drive a little easier, kiss my son more and my girl more, be nicer to people and laugh more. I wish you all the best and God Bless you and yours. Thanks again Loren that was something I needed brother.

  3. #468
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Bakersfield, CA
    Posts
    1,699
    Quote Originally Posted by slvr&blck760 View Post
    I just moved to Waikiki from Oahu's north shore. I was at my girls house, home alone because she went to work early. She's a nurse at Kapiolani hospital. I was drinking coffee and was reading about the Raiders when my phone buzzed. No matter, thought it was just a high surf and small craft advisory. I was wrong. I got a message saying an ICBM (Intercontinental Ballistic Missile) was headed for Hawaii. It wasnt a drill. Next thing I know, I hear my girls neighbor freaking out over the same message. My first call went to Mom. I got a voicemail. I said goodbye. I told her I loved her. I Couldnt believe I was leaving a message. I frantically tried calling her back. Nope. Phones went down. Fast busy signal. I called my girl. I managed to get through. I told her I loved her. She told me she loved me. She went back to work while trying to focus on frantic and panicking patients. I sat in her house for 30 minutes. The longest and strangest 30 minutes of my life, firmly believing it was over. I sat there in the eerie silence of a city that should be bustling. No car horns. No cars in her neighborhood. Nobody outdoors. Just the company of silence and my thoughts. My life flashed. Holy ****, did it flash. My thoughts flutteted between family, friends, unaccomplished life goals and what I had accomplished in my life. The truth was very clear and very real. I got my first update that it was a false alarm from twitter. I was confused. No confirmation was received from the Department of Defense. Phones were still down. Finally, I received confirmation from the DOD it was a false alarm. I went to work. I cleared my head by diving. Im blessed to be a dive instructor in paradise. I got to dive with a bunch of strangers. They had my back underwater. I had theirs. It was a soothing escape that we all needed. The dive rewarded us with an endangered Hawaiian Monk seal. Further clearing our heads from a much needed escape from reality above the surface. I went home. I hugged my girl harder than I ever have. I told her I loved her. I called my Mom. The call went through. I Told her I loved her and my family. My girl and I went and grabbed a beer. Many people were out. Waikiki is a melting pot of cultures and races. Unity was as common as aloha. People were extra kind to one another.

    We went to bed. My phone rang at 3:30a.m. I was in terror.

    Not again.

    Nope. It was an email notification ring. Edgy.

    Guys, all I can say is the experience changed my life. It widened my eyes and opened my heart to kindness for all of humanity. Love your family and friends like there is no tomorrow.

    There just may not be.

    Aloha ke akua.

    - Loren (slvr&blck760)
    I can't imagine the horror, shock, sadness, disbelief and confusion you experienced with that. So glad that was a false alarm for all of humanity. That would have been the start of WW3 for sure. You put a traumatic experience into a light that we could feel. Like another poster said, I felt like I was there. I'm a safety manager for a petroleum transportation company and travel a lot. I'm in an airport now trying to get home. Reading your message brought a tear yo my eye and made me think again how much I love my wife, family and Raider Brethren. Thank you for sharing.

  4. #469
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    The Garden of Eden...New Jersey
    Posts
    13,895
    That was a riveting post Loren. Choked me up, and Iím a callous old bastard.

    Thanks for the insight.

    -Stork


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    "Win some games, make the playoffs and show me you got some balls under the bright lights"

    -tippa irie

  5. #470
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Raider Nation
    Posts
    11,810
    Quote Originally Posted by slvr&blck760 View Post
    I just moved to Waikiki from Oahu's north shore. I was at my girls house, home alone because she went to work early. She's a nurse at Kapiolani hospital. I was drinking coffee and was reading about the Raiders when my phone buzzed. No matter, thought it was just a high surf and small craft advisory. I was wrong. I got a message saying an ICBM (Intercontinental Ballistic Missile) was headed for Hawaii. It wasnt a drill. Next thing I know, I hear my girls neighbor freaking out over the same message. My first call went to Mom. I got a voicemail. I said goodbye. I told her I loved her. I Couldnt believe I was leaving a message. I frantically tried calling her back. Nope. Phones went down. Fast busy signal. I called my girl. I managed to get through. I told her I loved her. She told me she loved me. She went back to work while trying to focus on frantic and panicking patients. I sat in her house for 30 minutes. The longest and strangest 30 minutes of my life, firmly believing it was over. I sat there in the eerie silence of a city that should be bustling. No car horns. No cars in her neighborhood. Nobody outdoors. Just the company of silence and my thoughts. My life flashed. Holy ****, did it flash. My thoughts flutteted between family, friends, unaccomplished life goals and what I had accomplished in my life. The truth was very clear and very real. I got my first update that it was a false alarm from twitter. I was confused. No confirmation was received from the Department of Defense. Phones were still down. Finally, I received confirmation from the DOD it was a false alarm. I went to work. I cleared my head by diving. Im blessed to be a dive instructor in paradise. I got to dive with a bunch of strangers. They had my back underwater. I had theirs. It was a soothing escape that we all needed. The dive rewarded us with an endangered Hawaiian Monk seal. Further clearing our heads from a much needed escape from reality above the surface. I went home. I hugged my girl harder than I ever have. I told her I loved her. I called my Mom. The call went through. I Told her I loved her and my family. My girl and I went and grabbed a beer. Many people were out. Waikiki is a melting pot of cultures and races. Unity was as common as aloha. People were extra kind to one another.

    We went to bed. My phone rang at 3:30a.m. I was in terror.

    Not again.

    Nope. It was an email notification ring. Edgy.

    Guys, all I can say is the experience changed my life. It widened my eyes and opened my heart to kindness for all of humanity. Love your family and friends like there is no tomorrow.

    There just may not be.

    Aloha ke akua.

    - Loren (slvr&blck760)
    Thank you Loren for the update. Your telling of the events from your personal view point really brings it home. I thought of you immediately when I heard. Funny the way this little Forum unites us. Your story is so profound, inspirational, and draws the reader in, as if we were sitting next to you the whole time. For the world as a whole, I am grateful that it was a false alarm, for you personally I am grateful it was only a moment of elucidation...a reckoning in a way of what really is important. To love, to serve, and to be true unto oneself and others. God bless you, our Nation, and Raider Nation. Aloha.

    "...prone to stoogery.".

  6. #471
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    The North Shore of O'ahu Hawaii
    Posts
    2,255
    The experience is still so vivid and fresh. I hope those feelings and clarity I had that day stay with me forever. Thank you guys for listening and responding. It helps me. More than you may realize.

    Go Raiders!

  7. #472
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    LA 2 Da Bay
    Posts
    6,799
    Hey Loren, how long would you have had from the time of the alert to the icbm making contact, if it had been real? Did you think of seeking shelter (basement, sewers) or going to the windward side of the island? What about meeting up with your girl for a last goodbye?

    My wife and I talked about what we would've done and came to the conclusion that we'd be screwed in the case of any threat, even if we had like a 3hr advanced warning, bc of LA traffic. There wouldn't be much to do except try to call either to say goodbye...

    Luckily, we live away from the heart of the city, upwind and on the other side of some mountains, so I think we would survive a nuclear blast.
    RAIDERS. ARE. BACK.

  8. #473
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    The North Shore of O'ahu Hawaii
    Posts
    2,255
    Quote Originally Posted by mberr View Post
    Hey Loren, how long would you have had from the time of the alert to the icbm making contact, if it had been real? Did you think of seeking shelter (basement, sewers) or going to the windward side of the island? What about meeting up with your girl for a last goodbye?

    My wife and I talked about what we would've done and came to the conclusion that we'd be screwed in the case of any threat, even if we had like a 3hr advanced warning, bc of LA traffic. There wouldn't be much to do except try to call either to say goodbye...

    Luckily, we live away from the heart of the city, upwind and on the other side of some mountains, so I think we would survive a nuclear blast.
    Aloha mberr,

    According to everything I've heard, we would have 15-20 minutes to react and say goodbye. Those minutes are a strange moment in time. Looking back, everything seemed so precise and almost frozen. Maybe it was a state of shock. Maybe it was adrenaline. Or maybe, just maybe it was acceptance. Maybe I was ok with where I was and how I lived my life. My thoughts were frozen on friends, family and my girlfriend. That's all that mattered in the moment.

    I didnt think of seeking shelter nor did I have any thought of leaving my girlfriends home. For some strange reason, I was acceptant. Again, looking back, I wouldn't have changed the way I reacted. Why, in a moment of death, would I want to leave the comfort of home for some strange structure and the onset of panic from complete strangers? No, I was acceptant of where I was and the inevitable. Leaving the confines of home never crossed my mind. Apparently, most residents felt the same. The streets of Kapahulu (a suburb of Waikiki - a stones throw away from downtown) were at a still. No movement, no panic, just pure silence.

    This island is small. Less than 40 miles seperate all sides. Nuclear fallout would have a devastating effect on Oahu's populous, regardless of whether an individual were located on the North, South, East or West facing shores. Reports say to have enough water and food to last 2 weeks. I can't help but think of the blast in the Bikini Atolls some 50 years ago where radition levels are still considered dangerous. Whats 2 weeks? I don't know if I'd want to live through that hell. It'd probably be easier physically and mentally to say goodbye than to survive. Loved ones, friends and family...Gone... The destruction to haunt you everyday. That would be tough. But at the same time, to not want to live seems cowardice. Im still thinking about the whole situation. A lot. Many of us are. Putting thoughts and emotions into context and describing EXACTLY how I feel isnt easy.

    My thoughts have been focused on those Im close to. Those that are far away from me are closer than ever.

    I hate the fact that it took a situation of this magnitude to open my world to whats most important. Friends, family, loved ones. But Im here and I'm thankful.

    Mahalo,

    - Loren
    "We don't take what the defense gives us; we take whatever the hell we want." - Al Davis

    ONE NATION, DOMINATION, RAIDER NATION!

  9. #474
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    3,073
    Quote Originally Posted by slvr&blck760 View Post
    Aloha mberr,

    According to everything I've heard, we would have 15-20 minutes to react and say goodbye. Those minutes are a strange moment in time. Looking back, everything seemed so precise and almost frozen. Maybe it was a state of shock. Maybe it was adrenaline. Or maybe, just maybe it was acceptance. Maybe I was ok with where I was and how I lived my life. My thoughts were frozen on friends, family and my girlfriend. That's all that mattered in the moment.

    I didnt think of seeking shelter nor did I have any thought of leaving my girlfriends home. For some strange reason, I was acceptant. Again, looking back, I wouldn't have changed the way I reacted. Why, in a moment of death, would I want to leave the comfort of home for some strange structure and the onset of panic from complete strangers? No, I was acceptant of where I was and the inevitable. Leaving the confines of home never crossed my mind. Apparently, most residents felt the same. The streets of Kapahulu (a suburb of Waikiki - a stones throw away from downtown) were at a still. No movement, no panic, just pure silence.

    This island is small. Less than 40 miles seperate all sides. Nuclear fallout would have a devastating effect on Oahu's populous, regardless of whether an individual were located on the North, South, East or West facing shores. Reports say to have enough water and food to last 2 weeks. I can't help but think of the blast in the Bikini Atolls some 50 years ago where radition levels are still considered dangerous. Whats 2 weeks? I don't know if I'd want to live through that hell. It'd probably be easier physically and mentally to say goodbye than to survive. Loved ones, friends and family...Gone... The destruction to haunt you everyday. That would be tough. But at the same time, to not want to live seems cowardice. Im still thinking about the whole situation. A lot. Many of us are. Putting thoughts and emotions into context and describing EXACTLY how I feel isnt easy.

    My thoughts have been focused on those Im close to. Those that are far away from me are closer than ever.

    I hate the fact that it took a situation of this magnitude to open my world to whats most important. Friends, family, loved ones. But Im here and I'm thankful.

    Mahalo,

    - Loren
    Glad for everyone's sake it was a false alarm. I'm sure you lost a few years off your life, or at least it seemed that way. It's easy to think things through AFTER everyone knew it was a false alarm. In the midst of that alarm, wondering about finding your family precludes your safety. I hope you never experience anything like that again. Be well!

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