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  1. #1
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    Fili's Intermittent Home Run Tracker Update

    This home run by Giancarlo Stanton got me (and lots of other people) thinking about home runs.

    People are gushing, and rightly, about Stanton's power.

    We can measure home runs and different factors in they have been hit.

    Stanton's home run traveled 366 feet.
    The speed off of the bat was 110.7 MPH
    It was hit at a vertical angle of 20.9 degrees
    It was hit at a horizontal angle of 54.1 degrees (dead center is 90 degrees and the 1B and 3B foul lines are 45 and 135 respectively).
    At its apex the ball was 48 feet in the air.

    I know this because the data is all available on ESPN's Hit Tracker site.

    Those are cool numbers, but what the heck do they mean? For that, we need a bit of context.


    One of the amazing things about Stanton's home run was how much of a line drive it was.

    What's a line drive?
    A batted ball that is described as a line drive is mostly due to the angle off of the bat.
    Stanton's HR came off of the bat at 20.9 degrees. That's not close to the lowest angle of a ball that cleared the fence this season.

    That home run was hit by Russ Martin. Martin's home run left that bat at an angle of just 16.4 degrees. Interestingly, he hit his harder than Stanton did (117.7 MPH) and it went farther (405 feet).

    At the other end of the spectrum is this blast by Jose Abreu. It had the highest initial launch angle - 45 degrees. This home run, though, didn't travel as far as Stanton's - only 353 feet. Nor was it hit as hard - "only" 97.1 MPH.

    Another thing that makes a line drive is how high the ball went. This is a little different from, but certainly related to, launch angle.
    Stanton's HR went 48 feet in the air. Martin's 44. Neither was the lowest home run of the season.

    That was this home run by Josh Donaldson. Donaldson's homer reached a max height of 43 feet - just a foot lower than Martin's and 3 feet lower than Stanton's.

    Kind of cool that the lowest home run of the year and the one with the highest launch angle (Abreu's) both traveled the same distance - 353 feet. Donaldson' managed that distance because he hit it much harder than Abreu did (110.5 MPH to 97.1 MPH).

    What has been the highest home run of the year? We go back to Jose Abreu. This shot off Danny Salazar reached a max height of 160 feet in the air.

    This homer, the highest of the year, traveled 359 total feet - 6 feet longer than the lowest homer of the year.

    That's cool. But what we really want to know is, 'Who killed it?'. Whose homer went the farthest? Who hit it the hardest?

    The hardest hit was a tie. Stanton and Ortiz both hit shots at 119.9 MPH.

    This homer by Stanton was actually more of a line drive than the one that started off this discussion. This homer had a launch angle of 20 degrees (compared to 20.9 degrees for the first one) and Papi's was nearly as much of a line drive (21.4 degrees).

    Now, the farthest home run of the season. Who hit it shouldn't be a surprise. Giancarlo Stanton has the season' farthest home run - 484 feet.


    I should mention, for comparison's and parallel's sake, the lowest and slowest home runs of the year. One home run takes both of those titles. This home run by Mike Trout. Trout's knock went just 348 feet and was hit at just 91.8 MPH. It got over the fence by the narrowest of margins.



    So, what made the original home run so impressive? It wasn't the hardest hit. It wasn't the most line drive hit. It wasn't the highest nor the lowest.

    It was an opposite field hit.

    There has not been an opposite field home run (higher than 117.5 degrees or lower than 62.5 degrees) hit this season harder than Stanton's. Nor has there been one hit 5 MPH slower than Stanton's (I have up looking there because I had to just scroll and look - meaning I might have missed someone).



    That's roughly half the season in home runs

    To Recap:
    Farthest: Stanton 484 feet, 118.8 MPH, 25.3 launch angle, 105.2 horizontal angle. 101 foot apex
    Shortest: Trout 348 feet, 91.8 MPH, 36.8 launch angle, 64.4 horizontal angle, 99 foot apex

    Hardest: Stanton 427 feet, 119.9 MPH, 20.0 launch angle, 110.1 horizontal angle, 56 foot apex
    Hardest: Ortiz 482 feet, 119.8 MPH, 21.4 launch angle, 81.1 horizontal angle, 79 foot apex
    Softest: Trout 348 feet, 91.8 MPH, 36.8 launch angle, 64.4 horizontal angle, 99 foot apex

    Highest: Abreu 359 feet, 103.9 MPH, 45 launch angle, 121 horizontal angle, 145 foot apex
    Lowest: Donaldson 353 feet, 110.5 MPH, 19.9 launch angle, 128.6 horizontal angle, 43 foot apex

    Flattest: Martin 405 feet, 117.7 MPH, 16.4 launch angle, 97.2 horizontal angle, 44 foot apex
    Steepest: Abreu 353 feet, 97.1 MPH, 45 launch angle, 121 horizontal angle, 145 foot apex


    Until next time, this has been Fili's Intermittent Home Run Tracker Update
    Donít argue with idiots because they will drag you down to their level and then beat you with experience. óGreg King

  2. #2
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    I'm really surprised it wasn't the lowest but then again I haven't seen every HR this year.
    Alshon's Athletic Bloodlines Run Deep (AND CATCH EVERYTHING)


  3. #3
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    Just curious, but I assume those are distances they would have gone had they not hit anything, rather than what they actually went?
    You have no idea how excited I am right now.


  4. #4
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    Trout's rank on the distance list was surprising to me.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by jej View Post
    Just curious, but I assume those are distances they would have gone had they not hit anything, rather than what they actually went?
    It's actually the calculated distance based on velocity and angle so that wind, altitude, bleachers, etc don't factor into the distance.
    Donít argue with idiots because they will drag you down to their level and then beat you with experience. óGreg King

  6. #6
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    Isn't Trout close to Stanton on farthest?

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by filihok View Post
    It's actually the calculated distance based on velocity and angle so that wind, altitude, bleachers, etc don't factor into the distance.
    Even better. Thanks.
    You have no idea how excited I am right now.


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