Like us on Facebook


Follow us on Twitter





Results 1 to 10 of 10
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    3,116
    vCash
    1500

    A Look at the Indy O-Line

    There has been one glaring issue with the Indianapolis Colts since the Andrew Luck era began, and that is the performance of the offensive line.

    Last season, even owner Jim Irsay brought up the need to improve Luckís protection.

    With the AFC South starting to improve (Iím looking at you, Jacksonville), the need for a strong offensive line that can both protect Luck and take the run game to the next level has never been more urgent.

    In the second season under Chuck Pagano and the first under offensive coordinator Pep Hamilton, the Colts made a slight improvement in Pro Football Focusís pass-blocking and run-blocking efficiency ratings from 2012 to 2013 (subscription required).

    In pass protection, they went from the 31st-rated unit (minus-46.4 rating) to 25th (rating of minus-20.4).

    They moved from 24th to 23rd in run blocking, although their efficiency actually went down
    . That could be a bad sign considering they want to be a team with a power run attack (part of this could be attributed to Trent Richardsonís subpar season in 2013, but thatís an completely different issue).

    Luckily for the Colts and their fans, former guard Mike McGlynn has departed. McGlynn was the worst guard in football to play at least 25 percent of his teamís snaps, per Pro Football Focus. (The craziest part is that McGlynn played 1,118 snaps last year before the team realized he needed to be removed. Maybe the front office should buy a subscription to Pro Football Focus?)

    Like McGlynn, former starting center Samson Satele is also no longer a part of the team. Satele was the fourth-worst overall center in football last year, posting a minus-nine pass-block efficiency rating (second-worst to David Baas). Although he was horrid in pass protection, he was the 19th-best center when it came to run blocking.

    Removing two of the worst linemen in football will surely help the Colts improve next year, which helps in a division where they will be facing J.J. Watt, Jadeveon Clowney and Chris Clemons twice a year.
    On Costanzo:

    Despite his mediocre play in protecting the quarterback, he was effective in run blocking, posting the highest efficiency rating of any player on the Colts.

    Unfortunately, he plays at a position where protecting the quarterback is his No. 1 priority.

    Another interesting tidbit that came up while looking at Castonzoís performance was how he fared against teamís with a premium pass-rusher.

    Against the Oakland Raiders (Lamarr Houston), Seattle Seahawks (Michael Bennett and Clemons), St. Louis Rams (second-leading sack artist in the NFL with Robert Quinn) and the Kansas City Chiefs twice (the dangerous duo of pass-rusher Tamba Hali and Justin Houston) Castonzo posted five of his seven games with a negative efficiency rating in pass protection.

    In addition, he gave up three of the four sacks he allowed all year and 21 of his 46 quarterback hurries allowed in those games....

    ...He needs to get more consistent, especially against premium pass-rushers, but he has shown flashes of being a very good left tackle.

    Also, another thing to consider, Castonzo will be 26 when the season starts with three full seasons under his belt.
    On Cherilus:
    Cherilus, meanwhile, was the most effective pass protector on the Colts roster, although he benefited from playing on the right side of the line.

    He was the most efficient lineman for the Colts last season, but he was mediocre in comparison with other right tackles throughout the NFL in run blocking, which is the most important aspect of playing on the right side.

    The best part about Cherilus is his ability to pass block despite playing on the right side of the line (well, aside from allowing 30 quarterback hurries). He allowed as many sacks (four) as his counterpart Castonzo. He was also the 11th-most efficient right tackle in protecting the quarterback.
    On Thomas:

    During his first six seasons (didnít play in 2010) with the Dolphins, New England Patriots and Colts, Thomas started 24 games, completing 1,484 snaps in those starts. He was incredibly efficient, posting a 20.0 efficiency rating overall, a 3.3 in pass blocking and a 17.1 in run blocking as a starter.

    From his limited sample size, Thomas really looked the part of an effective starting guard.
    On Thornton:
    Advanced metrics werenít Thorntonís friend, as he posted a minus-19.3 overall blocking grade, a minus-15.8 in pass blocking and a minus-7.8 in run blocking as a rookie, per Pro Football Focus.

    The one thing advanced metrics donít account for is his awesome full-armed tribal tattoo.


    Thorntonís quick feet allow him to execute effectively when pulling to the play side. Also, the Colts utilized a lot of zone blocking from the shotgun with Donald Brown. Although he left for San Diego, Vick Ballard and Ahmad Bradshaw will allow the Colts to use zone blocking on a consistent basis.

    There are some negative things I noticed about Thornton. Firstly, he appears to have very tight hips. Secondly, there were times when he would be slow to complete his blocking assignments

    Thornton still has a long way to go, but he is going to develop into a solid player by the time the 2014 regular season rolls around.
    On Center position:

    Mewhort could beat out Thornton for one of the guard positions, but the Coltsí use of him at center in some drills during rookie workouts gives reason to believe he could make the move to center.

    Plus, why else would they place his locker directly next to Andrew Luckís?

    If it isnít Mewhort, second-year man Khaled Holmes out of USC has a good chance at earning the starting nod.

    Holmes didnít receive much playing time last season, appearing on just 13 snaps as a fourth-round pick out of USC.

    Considering that the Colts invested a fourth-round pick on him and passed on USCís Marcus Martin in favor of Mewhort, that gives reason to believe that they think they have their center of the future on the roster.

    Although a lot can happen in training camp, the Colts are looking at having one of the most improved offensive lines in the league in both pass protection and the running game.
    Its a good read and i left out a lot of tidbits and examples in the article. ( VVVVVVV )

    http://bleacherreport.com/articles/2...ine-be-in-2014


    "In my eyes, life is likened to christian ideology... its molded into three parts best described by the divine comedy; inferno, purgatorio and paradiso. You can live it in self loathing and pity, obscurity and ambiguity, or with beauty and elegance. Does that make the ideology truth? no, it makes it an irrelevent metaphor." ;p

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Indiana
    Posts
    470
    vCash
    1500
    Nice stuff! Excited to see Thomas for a full season and also the center battle that is going to take place.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Indiana
    Posts
    5,643
    vCash
    1500
    Nice read but there are a few questions:

    If AC only allowed 4 sacks....are they crediting Luck with him not allowing more?

    Did they do metrics on McGlynn at center? I would be curious to see what they graded him at that position as opposed to Guard. We all knew how bad McGlynn was at G...but just curious to see if my eye test was right on him at center by their standards.

    I've never been too good at knowing much about the QB hurry stat. Knockdowns are easy, sacks are easy...but is a screen pass considered a hurry...technically it is supposed to be a hurried play by design. What constitutes a hurry? If the left side is over loaded does the LT get a hurry against if he can't block both? Not trying to bash their metrics like I usually would...honestly have always been confused about the hurry stat. Is it an actual stat or is it a stat that is open to judgement and there is never any official number? Also do they account for things like blown assignments by other people. Say the D overloads the left so the G and T are responsible for 3 defensive players. Both are locked in a block and the 3rd defender slips between the 2...now is the FB or RB who stayed in to block getting the stat, or do they give both the G and T a half a hurry? Again I have no clue on the hurry stat how it is decided and who decides it....or if there is an official number.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    3,116
    vCash
    1500
    A quarterback hurry is counted when a defender either forces a quarterback out of the pocket or pressures the throw. It doesn't necessarily mean that the defender actually forced the quarterback to make a bad throw. Hurries are often a good indicator of a team's pass rush. Just because a player is not getting sacks, it does not mean he is not a good pass rusher, because hurrying the quarterback into a poor decision can be just as effective.
    http://www.sportingcharts.com/dictio...l/hurries.aspx

    I cant get into that one site to check the advanced stats on McGlynn and i cant find anything else on him.

    Thats just the amount of sacks that were allowed in General coming from the player Costanzo was blocking.


    "In my eyes, life is likened to christian ideology... its molded into three parts best described by the divine comedy; inferno, purgatorio and paradiso. You can live it in self loathing and pity, obscurity and ambiguity, or with beauty and elegance. Does that make the ideology truth? no, it makes it an irrelevent metaphor." ;p

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Andrew Luck's world
    Posts
    74,107
    vCash
    1500
    Okay, so Grigson's approach is addition by subtraction, which makes sense if the team actually has starting caliber players to step in. That remains to be seen, though. I obviously love our tackles, but the interior is a giant mess especially if Thomas isn't healthy.

    Something that I thought of: would it work better if GC and AC switched positions considering their pass/run blocking abilities? Or is that too unrealistic/stupid?
    So Anna, what do you think about the notion that Russell Wilson is better than Andrew Luck?

    <3
    "[He's] a really complete player... There's not really any weaknesses to his game." - Bill Belichick on Andrew Luck
    "Luck has the most diverse skill set of any NFL quarterback" - Ron Jaworski on Andrew Luck being a top 5 QB

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Indiana
    Posts
    5,643
    vCash
    1500
    Quote Originally Posted by sfgiants1213 View Post
    Okay, so Grigson's approach is addition by subtraction, which makes sense if the team actually has starting caliber players to step in. That remains to be seen, though. I obviously love our tackles, but the interior is a giant mess especially if Thomas isn't healthy.

    Something that I thought of: would it work better if GC and AC switched positions considering their pass/run blocking abilities? Or is that too unrealistic/stupid?
    I don't think that AC would be happy with that switch on a contract year. I'm sure his agent would throw a fit since LT money and RT money are 2 completely different leagues. I don't disagree with the thought, but even the best teammate should take offense to the team cutting his earning power in half in a contract year. I don't think AC is a top 5 LT, could possibly be top 10 and certainly in the top 15...but in the top 5 we are talking about the difference between 10-11 million for a LT and 5-6 million for a RT. So if we switch him to the other side we would probably lose him to someone willing to pay over RT money for him to play LT, unless that someone was us.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Andrew Luck's world
    Posts
    74,107
    vCash
    1500
    Quote Originally Posted by matthollabak View Post
    I don't think that AC would be happy with that switch on a contract year. I'm sure his agent would throw a fit since LT money and RT money are 2 completely different leagues. I don't disagree with the thought, but even the best teammate should take offense to the team cutting his earning power in half in a contract year. I don't think AC is a top 5 LT, could possibly be top 10 and certainly in the top 15...but in the top 5 we are talking about the difference between 10-11 million for a LT and 5-6 million for a RT. So if we switch him to the other side we would probably lose him to someone willing to pay over RT money for him to play LT, unless that someone was us.
    Oh, I agree with you about the financial impact. I was just speaking in hypotheticals.
    So Anna, what do you think about the notion that Russell Wilson is better than Andrew Luck?

    <3
    "[He's] a really complete player... There's not really any weaknesses to his game." - Bill Belichick on Andrew Luck
    "Luck has the most diverse skill set of any NFL quarterback" - Ron Jaworski on Andrew Luck being a top 5 QB

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    2,972
    vCash
    1500
    I was thinking the same thing. I can care less if he likes the move, if he cant pass block as well playing the position thats the most about pass blocking then he needs to be switched. I honestly think the OLine would be better off if we did move him. Also I LOVE the tidbit about Mehort playing center just like iv said in here before but others told me that wasnt happening. Well apparently theyve already started testing the waters lol. Love it.


    Lucks on our side

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Indiana
    Posts
    5,643
    vCash
    1500
    Quote Originally Posted by ombada View Post
    http://www.sportingcharts.com/dictio...l/hurries.aspx

    I cant get into that one site to check the advanced stats on McGlynn and i cant find anything else on him.

    Thats just the amount of sacks that were allowed in General coming from the player Costanzo was blocking.
    That makes sense for the defensive stat to be defined that way. The questions I have are more how the opposite stat is figured (I guess hurry allowed is what they called it in the article)...especially strange situations.

    Hurries and even sacks allowed are not a main stream stat so they are pretty tough to dig up and always intrigued me...does every defensive hurry have to have a mirror hurry allowed, or are there situations where say an overload of a side didn't allow for enough blockers and hence you have a hurry with no hurry allowed? Also what about CB and Safety Blitzes. If the CB comes off the WR do they credit the WR with a hurry/sack allowed or is it the OL/RB/TE fault....Do they give RB and TEs hurries allowed?

    I don't think anyone in here gets paid to collect and understand stats, which aside from just general curiosity would be the only reason to know these things...but I figure most in here and the Pacers forum know I like to know the strange rules/stats whenever I can.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    23,929
    vCash
    1500
    I had no idea Castonzo was already 26...

    #iubb

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •