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  1. #1
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    Most important game in pro football history?

    I'd have to go with SB IV, when the Chiefs beat the Vikes. As we know the Packers had beat up on the Chiefs and Raiders then here comes Broadway Joe and that Jets win. Now it's NFL 2 AFL 1. If the Vikes had won the following year, it's NFL 3 AFL 1 making that Jets win looking like a fluke and a freakish occurance.

    In that game it was real obvious the Chiefs had the faster more athletic athletes. Big and fast Otis Taylor (Prairie View) was simply too much for those Vikes cornerbacks. Taylor was unlike anyone in the NFL at that time.

    So after the game the NFL got nervous, so here came the merger. They ended up sending Cleveland, Baltimore Colts and Pittsburg (back then they sucked) to the now AFC. Giving each conference 11 teams.

    The thing about the old AFL was their mix of HBCU athletes and big school guys, something we didn't' see to the same degree in the NFL.

    I do think things would be cooler if we had never seen the merger. Not a fan of interconference play. I prefer the mystery. Now we can sort of gage things because this AFC team beat that NFC team that beat......

    Prior to the merger there was a lot of....????? How would big Cookie "250 pound fullback" Gilchrist do vs NFL defenses? Could that Tobin Rote, Paul Lowe, Keith Lincoln and Lance Alworth Charger offense burn NFL defenses like they did AFL?
    Last edited by CCRider; 12-31-2013 at 02:06 AM.

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by CCRider View Post


    So after the game the NFL got nervous, so here came the merger. They ended up sending Cleveland, Baltimore Colts and Pittsburg (back then they sucked) to the now AFC. Giving each conference 11 teams.
    I'll go with the 1958 NFL championship game. Johnny Unitas put pro-football on the map with that one. The league had lost 20 or so teams due to finances up until then and 12 teams was about all it could support. Added 4 new teams in the next few years, and Lamar Hunt started the AFL in the aftermath. 45 million people watched the game that day.



    Al Davis stealing players from the NFL had more to do with the NFL approaching the AFL about a merger than the SB wins. TV rights as well for the AFL.

    Remember the merger was signed in June of 1966 that the leagues would merge in 1970. This was done before the first SB was even played. Lyndon B Johnson signed the merger into law (antitrust exemption) and he was out of office a year before SB IV was even played.

    The merger said they would play 4 league championship games first (they did), drafts would merge in 1967 (they did) and in 1970 the leagues would merge (they did). It validated that the AFL was worthy, but that was because Al Davis started signing NFL players left and right and they were giving big bucks to star college athletes (Namath, Billy Cannon, Lance Alworth, etc).

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by slashsnake View Post
    I'll go with the 1958 NFL championship game. Johnny Unitas put pro-football on the map with that one. The league had lost 20 or so teams due to finances up until then and 12 teams was about all it could support. Added 4 new teams in the next few years, and Lamar Hunt started the AFL in the aftermath. 45 million people watched the game that day.



    Al Davis stealing players from the NFL had more to do with the NFL approaching the AFL about a merger than the SB wins. TV rights as well for the AFL.

    Remember the merger was signed in June of 1966 that the leagues would merge in 1970. This was done before the first SB was even played. Lyndon B Johnson signed the merger into law (antitrust exemption) and he was out of office a year before SB IV was even played.

    The merger said they would play 4 league championship games first (they did), drafts would merge in 1967 (they did) and in 1970 the leagues would merge (they did). It validated that the AFL was worthy, but that was because Al Davis started signing NFL players left and right and they were giving big bucks to star college athletes (Namath, Billy Cannon, Lance Alworth, etc).

    There was something about backing out of the merger which after SBIV changed that.

    That 58 Colts Giants game gets a lot of press and it should but it didn't change the entire pro football landscape like the merger did. How many future Hall of Famers played in that game?

    While here...

    Lance Alworth was the best receiver in all of football and it was obvious.
    Last edited by CCRider; 12-31-2013 at 02:33 AM.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by CCRider View Post
    There was something about backing out of the merger which after SBIV changed that.

    That 58 Colts Giants game gets a lot of press and it should but it didn't change the entire pro football landscape like the merger did. How many future Hall of Famers played in that game?

    While here...

    Lance Alworth was the best receiver in all of football and it was obvious.

    I didn't hear about a backout, and it would have cost the NFL a lot and they'd have gone right back to the same situation which they were in, which was hemmoraging talent to the AFL. Remember the NFL approached the AFL about the merger, not the other way around. I don't see why the year following the Jets beating an NFL iconic team they would want to change their minds.

    I'd say the 58 game did change the landscape. The NFL became loved on TV, which is a big reason the AFL started, with the knowledge of that big TV deal which they did. Before that year the NFL wasn't really a moneymaker for the owners. Since then, it has been huge.

    It was the perfect game at the perfect time. The 2 minute drill, something we all know of was popularized that night (Unitas 4th quarter drive for the tying FG). A championship game overtime. Ref controversy (giffords first down).

    The next day there was the president saying he watched it from camp david. There were NFL players from that game on the Ed Sullivan show. Nixon was writing letters to the players. This was a league at the time where the joke was if you called the league offices, Bert Bell, the commissioner was usually the one to answer the phone. Players began being able to quit their 2nd jobs and be just football players after that game.

    I think what it did (and Namath and others built on) was make football players hero's just like baseball players.

    I remember the story about Lamar Hunt, in a hotel room going to watch a college basketball tournament, thinking of investing in a football or a baseball team. He turned on the TV, watched the 1958 championship game, and said that game made up his mind for him right then and there of what he'd be investing in.

  5. #5
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    And I'd put Lance in my top 5. Rice the best of the passing era. Lance had it all and the best of the dead ball era. Hutson the godfather of the receivers.

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    Quote Originally Posted by CCRider View Post
    I'd have to go with SB IV, when the Chiefs beat the Vikes. As we know the Packers had beat up on the Chiefs and Raiders then here comes Broadway Joe and that Jets win. Now it's NFL 2 AFL 1. If the Vikes had won the following year, it's NFL 3 AFL 1 making that Jets win looking like a fluke and a freakish occurance.
    Interesting take. I immediately thought of the Jets win, but this makes a ton of sense.
    "All truth passes through three stages. First, it is ridiculed. Second, it is violently opposed. Third, it is accepted as being self-evident."
    —Arthur Schopenhauer (German philosopher, 1788-1860)

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by slashsnake View Post
    I didn't hear about a backout, and it would have cost the NFL a lot and they'd have gone right back to the same situation which they were in, which was hemmoraging talent to the AFL. Remember the NFL approached the AFL about the merger, not the other way around. I don't see why the year following the Jets beating an NFL iconic team they would want to change their minds.

    I'd say the 58 game did change the landscape. The NFL became loved on TV, which is a big reason the AFL started, with the knowledge of that big TV deal which they did. Before that year the NFL wasn't really a moneymaker for the owners. Since then, it has been huge.

    It was the perfect game at the perfect time. The 2 minute drill, something we all know of was popularized that night (Unitas 4th quarter drive for the tying FG). A championship game overtime. Ref controversy (giffords first down).

    The next day there was the president saying he watched it from camp david. There were NFL players from that game on the Ed Sullivan show. Nixon was writing letters to the players. This was a league at the time where the joke was if you called the league offices, Bert Bell, the commissioner was usually the one to answer the phone. Players began being able to quit their 2nd jobs and be just football players after that game.
    I'm not sure about that last part. Even in the 60's I've heard many NFL players still had day or off season jobs.

    I read Gale Sayers "My Life & Times" and he mentions in the book that he worked a 2nd job.
    Last edited by MIKETOUHY; 01-02-2014 at 07:11 PM.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by MIKETOUHY View Post
    I'm not sure about that last part. Even in the 60's I've heard many NFL players still had day or off season jobs.

    I read Gale Sayers "My Life & Times" and he mentions in the book that je worked a 2nd job.
    Yeah the money was a little slower trickling down to most of the players. But that game was huge for the TV earnings, and caused the shift of the NFL being based on gate receipts. TV wasn't an enemy as some owners saw it (people could sit at home and watch rather than buy tickets to the game), but a huge boom for the league.

    I think Bert Bell died right around then and Rozelle came in and got the big TV deals for the league on the heels of that 58 championship. I remember they were saying that was the first time the owners could feel like they were steady. That first league wide TV deal covered their player costs. Basically they were guaranteed profits before selling one ticket, and that's been the way for the league ever since. A league that was stuck on 12 teams basically since day one (lots came and went), to one with 32 now.

    The AFL (Again where would it be without the TV exposure the NFL got in 1958) also increased salaries. When they started poaching NFL talent, they paid a lot. John Brodie went from what? 35 grand to 750k?

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by slashsnake View Post
    I'll go with the 1958 NFL championship game. Johnny Unitas put pro-football on the map with that one. The league had lost 20 or so teams due to finances up until then and 12 teams was about all it could support. Added 4 new teams in the next few years, and Lamar Hunt started the AFL in the aftermath. 45 million people watched the game that day.



    Al Davis stealing players from the NFL had more to do with the NFL approaching the AFL about a merger than the SB wins. TV rights as well for the AFL.

    Remember the merger was signed in June of 1966 that the leagues would merge in 1970. This was done before the first SB was even played. Lyndon B Johnson signed the merger into law (antitrust exemption) and he was out of office a year before SB IV was even played.

    The merger said they would play 4 league championship games first (they did), drafts would merge in 1967 (they did) and in 1970 the leagues would merge (they did). It validated that the AFL was worthy, but that was because Al Davis started signing NFL players left and right and they were giving big bucks to star college athletes (Namath, Billy Cannon, Lance Alworth, etc).
    Good post. Agreed.
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  10. #10
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    The most important ever? That's easy. It was last Sunday night in Dallas.
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  11. #11
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    Ok.

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