Like us on Facebook


Follow us on Twitter





Results 1 to 3 of 3
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Ontario
    Posts
    476
    vCash
    1500

    NBA Draft vs. Free Agent Signing

    This is kinda off topic with the recent PJ stuff going on in this forum or how to save the Raps, but it's something that I've always wondered and maybe some of you know the answer.

    Talent is obviously an issue (not the only one) with teams like the Raptors who constantly find themselves struggling year in and year out. This got me thinking about how GMs go about acquiring talent. Mainly talent is acquired via the NBA Draft and Free Agency (not really counting trades as you need talent to obtain talent, freebies don't often happen in this league).

    So my question to you guys is why do players automatically declare for the draft instead of signing with teams they would want to play for?

    I'm not talking about late 1st round or 2nd round picks as I know the draft is a way for these players to get in touch with teams and really showcase their talents and skills through pre-draft workouts...I'm talking about clear cut NBA prospects who are projected to go top 5. Why do these players declare and leave it to "chance" when it comes to where they start their NBA career. I understand that higher draft picks also receive a higher starting salary but are there rules which prohibit prospects from opting out of the draft and just signing with whatever team they wish to sign with?

    Only reasons I can think of off the top of my head are:

    - The allure of being ranked a top prospect and being selected higher than your peers.
    - The money

    Thanks in advance.

    Dishing out some love...and droppin dimes

    "If I was in the parking lot I'd jack him up"
    - Jack Armstrong

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    7,198
    vCash
    1500
    Quote Originally Posted by dayman View Post
    This is kinda off topic with the recent PJ stuff going on in this forum or how to save the Raps, but it's something that I've always wondered and maybe some of you know the answer.

    Talent is obviously an issue (not the only one) with teams like the Raptors who constantly find themselves struggling year in and year out. This got me thinking about how GMs go about acquiring talent. Mainly talent is acquired via the NBA Draft and Free Agency (not really counting trades as you need talent to obtain talent, freebies don't often happen in this league).

    So my question to you guys is why do players automatically declare for the draft instead of signing with teams they would want to play for?

    I'm not talking about late 1st round or 2nd round picks as I know the draft is a way for these players to get in touch with teams and really showcase their talents and skills through pre-draft workouts...I'm talking about clear cut NBA prospects who are projected to go top 5. Why do these players declare and leave it to "chance" when it comes to where they start their NBA career. I understand that higher draft picks also receive a higher starting salary but are there rules which prohibit prospects from opting out of the draft and just signing with whatever team they wish to sign with?

    Only reasons I can think of off the top of my head are:

    - The allure of being ranked a top prospect and being selected higher than your peers.
    - The money

    Thanks in advance.
    The short answer is yes, rules are in place. I don't have the specifics right now, but I can try and find them.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    7,198
    vCash
    1500
    55. Are there restrictions based on a player's age?

    There are rules regarding the minimum age for draft eligibility. A player can't play in the NBA unless he's been eligible for at least one draft (he doesn't have to actually be drafted, he just has to have been eligible). A player who is eligible for a draft must be at least 19 during the calendar year of that draft, and if a U.S. player, at least one year removed from high school. In addition, at least one of the following must be true:
    •The player has graduated from a U.S. four-year college or university prior to or during the calendar year of the draft, and has no remaining NCAA eligibility.
    •The player is attending or has previously attended a U.S. four-year college or university, his original class has graduated prior to or during the calendar year of the draft, and has no remaining NCAA eligibility.
    •The player attended high school in the U.S., did not attend college, and four years have elapsed since he graduated (or his class graduated, if he did not graduate).
    •The player has played as a professional outside the NBA prior to January 1 of the draft year.
    •The player has declared himself an "Early Entry" player.
    •The player is an international player (see question number 74) for whom at least one of the following is true: ◦Is 22 during the calendar year of the draft (an international player who is older than 22 and was not drafted in the year of his 22nd birthday is a free agent)
    ◦Has played as a professional in the U.S. but outside the NBA
    ◦Has declared himself an "Early Entry" player.


    The league and players association decided to table the discussion of raising the age for draft eligibility in order to facilitate a settlement of the 2011 lockout and start the 2011-12 season on December 25, 2011. The sides will form a joint committee to review and implement new rules regarding the age of eligibility. The rules from the 2005 CBA have been left in place until this committee has made its determinations (only the timing of contracts for players playing professionally outside the U.S. was changed in the meantime).

    There are also rules which prevent teams from padding extra years onto contracts for older players. The "Over-36" rule is described in question number 56.
    http://www.cbafaq.com/salarycap.htm#Q48

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •