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Thread: Ops

  1. #16
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    One out is one out. It doesn't matter how you get the out, at the end of the year. Yes, I know there are sac flys and sac bunts and whatnot, but when we're looking at overall production, it is what it is.

    Try not to look out how a player does something. A .300 average is a .300 average. Strikeouts, speed, etc. don't matter when you're talking about that .300 average. It doesn't affect that production.

    Also, a lot of guys with high strikeout rates may also have high walk rates. Outside of a small percentage of players, if you're striking it, much of the reason is because you're taking pitches. Mark Reynolds would be an example of that. Dunn would be another. These are guys who are constantly at the top of the league in pitches per AB. They also have super high strikeout and walk rates for that reason.

  2. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Driven View Post
    One out is one out. It doesn't matter how you get the out, at the end of the year. Yes, I know there are sac flys and sac bunts and whatnot, but when we're looking at overall production, it is what it is.

    Try not to look out how a player does something. A .300 average is a .300 average. Strikeouts, speed, etc. don't matter when you're talking about that .300 average. It doesn't affect that production.

    Also, a lot of guys with high strikeout rates may also have high walk rates. Outside of a small percentage of players, if you're striking it, much of the reason is because you're taking pitches. Mark Reynolds would be an example of that. Dunn would be another. These are guys who are constantly at the top of the league in pitches per AB. They also have super high strikeout and walk rates for that reason.
    This couldnt be more wrong. Especially considering sac flys and sac bunts dont count against your average, dont count as ABs, and could very well result in RBIS...


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  3. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bos_Sports4Life View Post
    I have a question..

    We all know ops is a pretty flawed stat as it combines slg/obp evenly and obp is the more important stat. For example a .400 obp/.400 slg has much more value than a player with a .300 obp/.500 slg

    So my question is, does anyone know how much more value OBP has over slg?? How much more should obp be taken into account for a better measure?
    Look at the Dodgers as a whole right now. They rank 1st in the NL in walks but yet they rank 14th in runs scored. They are not getting enough extra-base hits or just plain base hits in general to drive in those runs.

    Last edited by dodgerdave; 07-12-2012 at 03:01 PM.

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  4. #19
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    To the OP:

    Yes, Tom Tango did the math on this and even got B-R to adjust their OPS+ statistic to reflect the value of OBP/SLG.

    The new formula for OPS+ from Tom Tango is as follows:

    ([1.2*(OBP/lgOBP)]+[.8*(SLG/lgSLG)]-1)*100

    So, 1.2*OBP is equal to .8*SLG.

    This math correlates almost exactly to wOBA when steals are removed, and wRC+ and OPS+ are almost identical.

    So, theoretically, 1 pt of SLG is worth 1.5 pt of OBP. However, I believe Tango had the actual correlation to runs at 1.7, so I'm not sure why the 1.2 and .8 are the numbers, because they work out to 1.5.
    Last edited by WadeKobe; 08-31-2012 at 11:48 AM.

  5. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by MotownWebGuy View Post
    WAR is more flawed than OPS.
    Raw OPS? Questionable.

    Adjusted OPS (park, era) - for sure more accurate than WAR.


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