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  1. #31
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    awful article though, talks nothing about our prospects, just about the collapse...pathetic
    Perfect combos, Ghost bang out condos
    Jeff from Hamo, ex three bangos
    Bancos, stank hoes in plain clothes
    Change those, bang those, same old, same old

  2. #32
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    Question: are we (PSD) overrating Lavarnway or all those prospect-sites underrating him? In my book he's as sure of a top 3 prospect as it gets, but even BA has him barely on its top 10.
    And I really really really love Swihart, but #3 without having played a game? WOW

    BTW: huge drop-off for Iglesias, now we are stuck with him as his value completely vanished. I would have traded him when his value was sky-high. But there is still time and I might be wrong, but his bat is such a huge quesion mark.

  3. #33
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    They are clearly underrating him. Montero gets alot of love and hype, yet Lavarnway has consistently put up monstrous numbers at every level and still gets no love. Not to mention that with the strides Lav has made defensively, he has the much better chance to stick at catcher. It's a shame really, but we shouldn't care, even if he was hyped we wouldn't trade him. He's here to stay and I must say, his swing is beautiful. Absolutely 0 holes in his swing.

  4. #34
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    Found this on Sox Prospects, related to BA's list.

    Some excerpts from their attached scouting report for subscribers only:

    Middlebrooks
    If scouts drew up a blueprint for a third baseman, it would look like Middlebrooks. He has the size, athleticism, power and arm strength coveted at the hot corner. He continues to learn more about his swing and increase his home run production each year, with more to come in the future. Right now, most of his homers come to the opposite field and are line drives that carry out of the park. With his bat speed and the strength in his 6-foot-4, 200-pound frame, he could hit 25 or more homers a season if he turns on more pitches and adds more loft to his stroke.

    Bogaerts
    Bogaerts has the highest ceiling among Red Sox prospects. He'll remain at shortstop in 2012, and Boston will have to send him to high Class A Salem at age 19 to challenge him. If he moves just one level a year, he'd still arrive in the majors at 22.

    Swihart
    Swihart has the Buster Posey starter kit. There's no reason to think Swihart can't catch, but if Boston wants to expedite his bat, he's athletic enough to play on the infield and outfield corners.

    Ranaudo
    After hitting the wall last July, Ranaudo recovered and posted a 2.35 ERA in his final five starts without his sharpest stuff. Ticketed for Double-A in 2012, he profiles as a steady No. 3 starter who could be big league-ready in 2013.

    Brentz
    The Red Sox were looking for a righthanded bat and a right fielder this offseason. Brentz isn't ready to fill those needs yet, but he could be in mid-2013. A potential .270 hitter with 30-homer power, he's headed to Double-A.

    Barnes
    Barnes has better pure stuff than Ranaudo, but not as much polish and mound presence. He'll probably follow Ranaudo's path in 2012, making his pro debut in low Class A and pushing for a midseason promotion. Barnes may not need much time in the minors, especially if he regains his curve.

  5. #35
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    Found this on Sox Prospects, related to BA's list.

    Some excerpts from their attached scouting report for subscribers only:

    Middlebrooks
    If scouts drew up a blueprint for a third baseman, it would look like Middlebrooks. He has the size, athleticism, power and arm strength coveted at the hot corner. He continues to learn more about his swing and increase his home run production each year, with more to come in the future. Right now, most of his homers come to the opposite field and are line drives that carry out of the park. With his bat speed and the strength in his 6-foot-4, 200-pound frame, he could hit 25 or more homers a season if he turns on more pitches and adds more loft to his stroke.

    Bogaerts
    Bogaerts has the highest ceiling among Red Sox prospects. He'll remain at shortstop in 2012, and Boston will have to send him to high Class A Salem at age 19 to challenge him. If he moves just one level a year, he'd still arrive in the majors at 22.

    Swihart
    Swihart has the Buster Posey starter kit. There's no reason to think Swihart can't catch, but if Boston wants to expedite his bat, he's athletic enough to play on the infield and outfield corners.

    Ranaudo
    After hitting the wall last July, Ranaudo recovered and posted a 2.35 ERA in his final five starts without his sharpest stuff. Ticketed for Double-A in 2012, he profiles as a steady No. 3 starter who could be big league-ready in 2013.

    Brentz
    The Red Sox were looking for a righthanded bat and a right fielder this offseason. Brentz isn't ready to fill those needs yet, but he could be in mid-2013. A potential .270 hitter with 30-homer power, he's headed to Double-A.

    Barnes
    Barnes has better pure stuff than Ranaudo, but not as much polish and mound presence. He'll probably follow Ranaudo's path in 2012, making his pro debut in low Class A and pushing for a midseason promotion. Barnes may not need much time in the minors, especially if he regains his curve.

  6. #36
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    nice...found it interesting that Baseball America has XB as our RF in 2015.....
    Perfect combos, Ghost bang out condos
    Jeff from Hamo, ex three bangos
    Bancos, stank hoes in plain clothes
    Change those, bang those, same old, same old

  7. #37
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    wow baseball america, someone should be fired for writing that write-up. Oh well let's just not talk about prospects, and write a summary of the Red Sox collapse, even though we are about 5 months late with it, and no one cares anymore.

    Seriously, the first paragraph should have acknowledged the collapse, and the shakeup, then go into prospect discussion

    **** you Jim Callis
    Jackie Bradley Junior.... that is all

  8. #38
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    Callis chat with BA subscribers

    Jim Callis: Iglesias almost made the Top 10, but I ultimately put him at No. 12 because I couldn't find a scout outside the organization who believed at all in his bat. That's a little harsh, because going to Triple-A at 21 wasn't completely fair to him. Given the degree of difficulty, I'd actually call Drake Britton and Stolmy Pimentel biggest disappointments in 2011.

    Jim Callis: The new changes may hurt the Red Sox more than any other team. After the compensation rules change in 2012, they're not going to have many if any extra picks and they're going to have one of the lowest draft signing caps of any team. No club was as aggressive outside the first round as Boston was, and that's probably going to change because the penalties for excessive spending are prohibitive.

    Bill D (Easton): Which pitchers do you see helping the Red Sox the most in 2012? Wilson? Doubrant? or some dark horse?
    Jim Callis: Wilson is the clear favorite.

    Bill D (Boston): If you had to chose two potential breakout candidates (one pitcher, one position player) for the Red Sox in 2012 who would they be?

    Jim Callis: Position player: Garin Cecchini, who should finally be healthy and get in a full season. Pitcher: Kyle Stroup, the last pick in the 2008 draft.

    George (Warwick, RI): Internal option not named "Alex Wilson" most likely to help at the MLB level, during 2012?...sleeper?

    Jim Callis: I'll give you two deep sleepers: Chris Hernandez and Chris Martin.

    Alex (Miami): Boston system is well known for having very good depth, but where does it rank overall?

    Jim Callis: In our preliminary rankings in the Handbook, we had the Red Sox at No. 10. Which is a tribute to their depth, considering they don't have a slam-dunk Top 50 overall prospect.
    Last edited by AI; 01-06-2012 at 04:30 PM.

  9. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by corky831 View Post
    Hate that list too.

  10. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by AI4LIFE View Post
    Callis chat with BA subscribers
    There's a lot more of the chat here

    http://www.baseballamerica.com/today...2/2612790.html

  11. #41
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    Very excited about Iglesias, Bogaerts and Middlebrooks. Iglesias' offense sucked last year, there's no sugarcoating it. But he was also a 21 year old in AAA. I think at worst he's a Jack Wilson type.

  12. #42
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    more from BA
    Will Middlebrooks
    1. Middlebrooks had multiple options when he came out of Liberty-Eylau High (Texarkana, Texas) in 2007. He threw low 90s fastballs and occasionally spun plus curveballs as a pitcher, and he drew interest from college football programs as both a quarterback and a punter. His future appeared even brighter at third base than on the mound or the gridiron, however, and that was the path he chose. Considered a supplemental first-round talent, Middlebrooks slid to the fifth round because of signability concerns and a commitment to Texas A&M, and he landed an above-slot $925,000 bonus. He has moved slowly but surely through the Red Sox system, improving his performance in each of his four pro seasons. He had his best year yet in 2011, when managers rated him as the best hitting prospect in the Double-A Eastern League. He went 1-for-2 in the Futures Game, earned EL all-star honors and reached Triple-A Pawtucket in August. He finished his year by smacking four homers in 13 Arizona Fall League games before straining a ligament in his left hand chasing a foul ball, an injury that didn't require surgery. Boston added him to its 40-man roster in November.

    Scouting Report: If scouts drew up a blueprint for a third baseman, it would look like Middlebrooks. He has the size, athleticism, power and arm strength coveted at the hot corner. He continues to learn more about his swing and increase his home run production each year, with more to come in the future. Right now, most of his homers come to the opposite field and are line drives that carry out of the park. With his bat speed and the strength in his 6-foot-4, 200-pound frame, he could hit 25 or more homers a season if he turns on more pitches and adds more loft to his stroke. Middlebrooks is an aggressive hitter who doesn't walk much and may not hit more than .275 or so in the majors, though that's an acceptable trade-off for everything else he offers. He needs to manage at-bats better and make sure his load and timing don't get out of sync. While he remains streaky, his hot spells are lasting longer and his cold spells are ending more quickly. He's doing a better job of waiting for pitches he can hammer rather than getting himself out early in counts. He also understands that he's at his best when he lets his power come naturally, though he can get home run-conscious at times. Middlebrooks is a below-average runner but moves well for his size and isn't a liability on the bases. He's an asset at third base, where he's extremely agile and has a cannon for his arm. He competes well and has emerged as a leader in the system.

    Xander Bogaerts ss
    2. Background: Signed for $410,000 out of Aruba, Bogaerts' 2010 pro debut made him Boston's most highly anticipated international prospect since Hanley Ramirez. When he came to the United States and dominated in extended spring training, the Red Sox sent him to low Class A Greenville at age 18 last June, and he responded by smashing 16 homers in 72 games. His twin brother Jair is a first baseman in the system.

    Scouting Report: Bogaerts doesn't look like a teenager when he's in the batter's box. He has an easy swing loaded with natural power, and he makes hard contact to all fields. While he still needs to learn the strike zone, he has already shown the ability to make adjustments and handle breaking balls. He could be a .280 hitter with 30 home runs in the majors, and that might be setting the bar low. Bogaerts has fluid actions at shortstop, but he lacks the quick feet for the position and will eventually outgrow it once he fills out. With his plus athleticism, average speed and a strong arm, he'll be able to transition to third base or right field.

    3. Swihart
    Background: Swihart starred with the U.S. national 18-and-under team in 2010, batting .448/.492/.845. The Red Sox drafted him 26th overall last June, making him their highest-drafted catcher since No. 14 pick John Marzano in 1984. Swihart signed at the Aug. 15 deadline for $2.5 million, a franchise record for a position player.

    Scouting Report: Swihart has uncommon offensive potential and athleticism for a catcher. A switch-hitter, he handles the bat better from his natural right side and has more pull power as a lefty. In instructional league, he doubled off the wall batting lefthanded against a rehabbing Clay Buchholz. Swihart projects as at least a plus hitter with a chance for average or better power. He has quick feet and moves well behind the plate, showing promising blocking and receiving skills despite catching for little more than a year. He also has plus arm strength and has made strides streamlining his release. He has average speed but will lose a step as he matures.

    7. Cecchini
    Background: Cecchini might have been a first-round pick in 2010 had he not blown out the anterior cruciate ligament in his right knee and required reconstructive surgery that March. His rumored price tag made teams back off until the Red Sox drafted him in the fourth round and signed him for $1.31 million at the deadline. He tore up older competition in the short-season New York-Penn League last summer until an errant pitch broke his right wrist in late July. His brother Gavin is a potential first-rounder in the 2012 draft.

    Scouting Report: Cecchini is the best pure hitter in the system. He has outstanding hand-eye coordination, and he manages at-bats and controls the strike zone well for a youngster. He inside-outs a lot of balls now, and he should have solid power once he gets stronger and turns on more pitches. Cecchini worked diligently to get back in shape after his knee injury, regaining his average speed. A high school shortstop, he moved to third base at Lowell and made 10 errors in 26 games. He has the hands, arm and agility to get the job done once he learns the position.

    8. Barnes
    Background: The Red Sox fell in love with Barnes when they saw him duel Anthony Ranaudo in a Cape Cod League matchup in 2010, and they were delighted to get him with the 19th overall pick last June. He set a Connecticut school record with 247 career strikeouts and led the Huskies to their first-ever NCAA super-regional in 2011. He signed minutes before the Aug. 15 deadline for $1.5 million.

    Scouting Report: Barnes can work in the mid-90s with his fastball as a starter, holding his velocity deep into games and topping out at 97. His effortless heat and explosive life are reminiscent of Daniel Bard's. Barnes had a quality curveball in the past, though it regressed in 2011 when he started working on a slider that Boston likely will have him scrap. He has made progress with his changeup but it lacks consistency. Barnes throws strikes but sometimes misses up in the zone when he doesn't stay on top of his pitches. He has an easy delivery but it lacks deception.

  13. #43
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    Sox pitching prospect Wilson has eyes on Boston

    08:14 PM Eastern Standard Time on Thursday, January 12, 2012

    By BRIAN MacPHERSON

    Journal Sports Writer

    As far as Alex Wilson is concerned, the Red Sox can add as much veteran pitching depth as they want. Hes still got his eyes on a major-league roster spot coming out of spring training.

    Im looking at it like Im the young guy, Im the underdog coming in, Wilson said in a phone interview Thursday morning. Its the perfect time for me to go out and prove a point and make a name for myself, knowing there are positions that arent solidified. In my mind, theres no reason I shouldnt have a shot at competing for one of those positions like anybody else.

    Im there to win a job, basically.

    The 25-year-old Wilson, the Red Sox Minor-League Pitcher of the Year last season, will be one of four players attending the Pawtucket Red Sox Hot Stove Party at McCoy Stadium on Friday. Pitcher Brandon Duckworth, catcher Luis Exposito and outfielder Alex Hassan also will join PawSox manager Arnie Beyeler for the event, which begins at 6 p.m. and will give fans an opportunity to collect autographs and pose for pictures.

    If Wilson has his way, though, he might not be in Pawtucket for long this season if at all.

    The righty compiled a 3.05 ERA in 21 starts at Double-A Portland and a 3.43 ERA in four starts after a late-season promotion to Triple-A. He then threw seven strong innings three earned runs allowed, six strikeouts, one walk in a playoff loss to Lehigh Valley in September. Baseball America last week ranked his fastball and his slider as the best in the Red Sox farm system.

    It was a strong rebound from the 6.66 ERA he posted in 16 starts after he was promoted to Double-A for the first time in 2010.

    I made up my mind before I even got [to Triple-A] that I wasnt going to be timid, he said. I was timid when I first made the jump to Double-A, and it really hurt me. Last year, after I earned the opportunity to get moved up, I had a totally different mindset going into it, and I think it really helped.

    The Red Sox have revamped their pitching staff this winter, and they might not be done. Jonathan Papelbon has departed for Philadelphia, and Daniel Bard is preparing for spring training as if hell be a starting pitcher. Carlos Silva and Aaron Cook both have a chance to crack the starting rotation. Former Astros closer Mark Melancon and former Athletics closer Andrew Bailey both have been acquired and figure to make up the back end of the bullpen.

    The arrival of Bailey serves as a reminder of what Wilson could contribute to the Red Sox this season. Bailey had pitched a full season in Double-A in 2008, but he won a major-league job with Oakland out of spring training in 2009 and, by the end of the year, he was the American League Rookie of the Year.

    Hes not the only one to have taken that path, either.

    If you look at Bard, he only had a handful of appearances in Triple-A before he made the jump, Wilson said. It doesnt happen very often, but it does happen.

    If the Red Sox had a largely set pitching staff coming back, Wilson might not have a chance to win a job no matter how well he pitched in spring training. But the Red Sox dont necessarily know who their five starters will be, let alone who will fill out their bullpen.

    An opportunity exists for Wilson, probably in the bullpen, if he can seize it.

    I feel like, if you dont look at it that way, youre cutting yourself at the knees and not allowing yourself to have that chance, he said. From what Ive gathered, I should have as good a shot as anybody else. Theyve explained that I need to come in in shape and ready to go and ready to compete for a spot.

    Wilson has done what he can do on that front. He spent the first part of the offseason splitting his time between his workouts and a part-time job stocking shelves at a Lowes store. He woke up at 4 a.m. a far cry from his normal 10 a.m. wakeup call during the season and worked from 5 a.m. until 1 p.m. before starting his daily workouts.

    Since Christmas, however, Wilson has started to ease into his throwing program. Hes already throwing long-toss. Hell get on a mound after he gets home from Rhode Island. Hes also kept up his workouts, even losing seven pounds enough for me to feel a difference, he said.

    When pitchers and catchers report in a little over a month, Wilson will have a chance to see if his work can pay off in a big-league roster spot. If not, the call figures to come sooner rather than later once the season begins.

    I feel like what I do, personally, on and off the field, is good enough to compete against anybody, he said. I feel like, if I stay consistent and I keep doing what I do day in and day out and prepare the way I know I should, I should have no problem with the jump. Its one of those things that comes down to how competitive you are and how bad you want it and Im real hungry right now.

    http://www.providencejournal.com/spo...2.1702b5b.html
    .

  14. #44
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    I like Wilson, he's gonna have to help us out at some point this year.

    The more I think about it I want to deal Middlebrooks. His k and bb rates worry me and his hype is higher now than it will ever be. If he can land us a top of the line starter we need to pull the trigger.

  15. #45
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    He might be trade bait by the deadline when SP's become available.

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