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  1. #1
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    New Ala. Gov: Just Christians are his family

    Are you f'n kidding me?


    New Ala. gov: Just Christians are his family

    By JAY REEVES, Associated Press Jay Reeves, Associated Press
    Tue Jan 18, 11:39 pm ET

    .BIRMINGHAM, Ala. Alabama Gov. Robert Bentley told a church crowd just moments into his new administration that those who have not accepted Jesus as their savior are not his brothers and sisters, shocking some critics who questioned Tuesday whether he can be fair to non-Christians.

    "Anybody here today who has not accepted Jesus Christ as their savior, I'm telling you, you're not my brother and you're not my sister, and I want to be your brother," Bentley said Monday, his inauguration day, according to The Birmingham News.

    The Anti-Defamation League on Tuesday called Bentley's remarks shocking.

    "His comments are not only offensive, but also raise serious questions as to whether non-Christians can expect to receive equal treatment during his tenure as governor," said Bill Nigut, the ADL's regional director.


    Speaking at Dexter Avenue King Memorial Church after the official inaugural ceremony, Bentley told the crowd that he considered anyone who believed in Jesus to be his brothers and sisters regardless of color, but anyone who isn't a Christian doesn't have that same relationship to him.

    "If the Holy Spirit lives in you that makes you my brothers and sisters. Anyone who has not accepted Jesus, I want to be your brothers and sisters, too," Bentley said.

    After his speech, Bentley said he did not mean to insult anyone.

    Responding to questions about it, Bentley's office released a statement Tuesday saying he believes "he is the governor of all of Alabama."

    "The governor clearly stated that he will be the governor of all Alabamians — Democrat, Republican and Independent, young, old, black and white, rich and poor. As stated in his (inaugural) address, Gov. Bentley believes his job is to make everyone's lives better," the statement said.

    Ashfaq Taufique, president of the Birmingham Islamic Society, told The Birmingham News he wasn't sure how Bentley's remarks were intended.

    "Does it mean that those who according to him are not saved are less important than those who are saved?" Taufique said. "Does he want those of us who do not belong to the Christian faith to adopt his faith? That should be toned down. That's not what we need. If he means that, I hope he changes it. We don't want evangelical politicians. They can be whatever in their private life."

    The official with the Anti-Defamation League, which fights discrimination against Jewish people, said it sounded like Bentley was using the office of governor to advocate for Christian conversion.

    "If he does so, he is dancing dangerously close to a violation of the First Amendment of the U.S. Constitution, which forbids government from promoting the establishment of any religion," Nigut said.

    ___

    Associated Press Writer Bob Johnson in Montgomery contributed to this report.
    Yaaaaahoooooo oooo

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    I don't really see the problem. So I'm not his brother? I don't want to be his brother. As long as he is not taking that out on me, I don't care.

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    Quote Originally Posted by philab View Post
    I don't really see the problem. So I'm not his brother? I don't want to be his brother. As long as he is not taking that out on me, I don't care.
    He's expressing intolerance for a segment of the state's population to which he is running. On a personal level I couldn't care less, but in a general sense it is a very dangerous direction to allow states to run in.

    I think England and some other European countries (maybe Canada too) got it right by simply taking religion out of campaigns altogether. Just don't mention it. It shouldn't be a factor one way or another.

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    Quote Originally Posted by GGGGG-Men View Post
    He's expressing intolerance for a segment of the state's population to which he is running. On a personal level I couldn't care less, but in a general sense it is a very dangerous direction to allow states to run in.
    Well, yeah, it's not a great first step, but it's also not evidence that he'll continue in that direction. And I don't see the intolerance. He didn't say that he'll treat his non-family harshly or even differently. He just assigned some rather cliched definitions to Christians and non-Christians from a personal perspective.

    I think England and some other European countries (maybe Canada too) got it right by simply taking religion out of campaigns altogether. Just don't mention it. It shouldn't be a factor one way or another.
    Well, I certainly agree that religion should not be anywhere in any campaign whatsoever. Or in the sphere of politics altogether, for that matter. I don't think I'd codify that, though. In other words, politicians are free to prey on the arational or irrational; I just wish they wouldn't.

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    Quote Originally Posted by philab View Post
    Well, yeah, it's not a great first step, but it's also not evidence that he'll continue in that direction. And I don't see the intolerance. He didn't say that he'll treat his non-family harshly or even differently. He just assigned some rather cliched definitions to Christians and non-Christians from a personal perspective.
    At what point do you draw the line. these people over here who I have never met but we share the same go belief are close to me......those people over there who share a different belief I do not view in the same way

    It's intolerance of a group of people who he differs in scriptural opinion and he's running their state. I think the implications of this are very scary. What does it mean when it comes time for a mosque to be zoned for being built and a group of Christians protest....will he take the side of his "brothers" or his foes.

    There is no place for this gibberish in politics.


    Quote Originally Posted by philab View Post
    Well, I certainly agree that religion should not be anywhere in any campaign whatsoever. Or in the sphere of politics altogether, for that matter. I don't think I'd codify that, though. In other words, politicians are free to prey on the arational or irrational; I just wish they wouldn't.
    Why shouldn't it be? If religious belief is supposed to take a back seat in public policy, then it shouldn't be discussed on a campaign trail or inaugural address. Granted the places I mentioned, it's really more of a common understanding, but we don't have that luxury here.

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    Quote Originally Posted by GGGGG-Men View Post
    At what point do you draw the line. these people over here who I have never met but we share the same go belief are close to me......those people over there who share a different belief I do not view in the same way

    It's intolerance of a group of people who he differs in scriptural opinion and he's running their state. I think the implications of this are very scary. What does it mean when it comes time for a mosque to be zoned for being built and a group of Christians protest....will he take the side of his "brothers" or his foes.

    There is no place for this gibberish in politics.
    Those are different scenarios. The time hasn't come for a mosque to be zoned yet. Sure, this puts the guy on notice, but he hasn't yet done anything intolerant. All he's done is call one group of people "like me" and call everyone else "not like me." It's an inch in the wrong direction, but don't take it for a mile.

    If you and my brother both applied for a job and I was the employer, of course you'd be scared that my relationship with my brother would make me impartial. But you can't really call me "impartial" until I have actually made an impartial decision.

    And no, there's no place for religion in politics, but I can't really start blowing the sirens over something so small.


    Why shouldn't it be? If religious belief is supposed to take a back seat in public policy, then it shouldn't be discussed on a campaign trail or inaugural address. Granted the places I mentioned, it's really more of a common understanding, but we don't have that luxury here.
    I thought I agreed with you. Religion shouldn't be anywhere in politics, whether campaign trail, inaugural address, decision-making, public policy, or whatever.

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    Quote Originally Posted by philab View Post
    And no, there's no place for religion in politics, but I can't really start blowing the sirens over something so small.
    I hear ya. I find it to be bigger though.


    Quote Originally Posted by philab View Post
    I thought I agreed with you. Religion shouldn't be anywhere in politics, whether campaign trail, inaugural address, decision-making, public policy, or whatever.
    You did to the extent that you wouldn't codify it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by GGGGG-Men View Post
    You did to the extent that you wouldn't codify it.
    Yeah. You would codify that? Seems like it would run afoul of a number of constitutional principles, including free speech, and principles of autonomy. I don't mean to imply that those principles are always sound, but they do seem to win out in this case.

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    Quote Originally Posted by philab View Post
    Yeah. You would codify that? Seems like it would run afoul of a number of constitutional principles, including free speech, and principles of autonomy. I don't mean to imply that those principles are always sound, but they do seem to win out in this case.
    Fine line between free speech and religious preference in policy making I suppose.

  10. #10
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    TPM

    Alabama's new governor has apologized for comments he made on Martin Luther King Jr. Day, when he told a crowd at the Dexter Avenue King Memorial Baptist Church in Montgomery, "anybody here today who has not accepted Jesus Christ as their savior, I'm telling you, you're not my brother and you're not my sister, and I want to be your brother."

    "What I would like to do is apologize," Gov. Robert Bentley told reporters, according to The Birmingham News. "Should anyone who heard those words and felt disenfranchised, I want to say, 'I'm sorry.' If you're not a person who can say you are sorry, you're not a very good leader."

    Jewish leaders met with Bentley this afternoon, and Montgomery Rabbi Elliot Stevens told WSFA, "I do not think the governor meant anything negative." According to WSFA:

    The governor said when he made the comments to the church audience he assumed he was speaking as a private citizen and not as the Governor of Alabama.
    Bentley made the original comments shortly after taking the oath of office on Monday, and he was speaking in the Montgomery church where Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. was once pastor.

    Soon after Bentley spoke, Rebekah Caldwell Mason, his communications director, told the press that Bentley ''is the governor of all the people, Christians, non-Christians alike."
    As a Jewish Liberal, I give the Governor credit. He said something he should not have said, recognized it, owned up to it.

    Good job Governor. I may never say that about you again, or I may, but in this case, you did the right thing.
    Here is the question of the day, does anyone think that wealthy people should pay a lower percentage of their income to taxes than middle class people? Don't argue tax brackets, just a simple question. Do you think someone earning 46 million dollars should pay a lower percentage of their income than say someone earning sixty thousand?

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    Quote Originally Posted by cabernetluver View Post
    TPM



    As a Jewish Liberal, I give the Governor credit. He said something he should not have said, recognized it, owned up to it.

    Good job Governor. I may never say that about you again, or I may, but in this case, you did the right thing.
    Good for him, ethics wise. Morally, I still think he's f'd. People like this in charge frighten me.

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    i wonder why most of the times its conservatives/republicans that have problems with minorities. i.e. hispanics, blacks, non religious people, immigrants, muslims etc etc. Why are conservatives less tolerant towards others than the rest of us??

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    Quote Originally Posted by lamar2006 View Post
    i wonder why most of the times its conservatives/republicans that have problems with minorities. i.e. hispanics, blacks, non religious people, immigrants, muslims etc etc. Why are conservatives less tolerant towards others than the rest of us??
    Because there's right and left and people follow patterns forever. Since the early days of the french parliment when the terms began and the people on the right voted for property and the people on the left voted for people. The "traditionalists" will go backwards and the "progressives" will go forward.

    It doesn't matter that it was the conservatives of the day that supported getting rid of gay marriage or not allowing women to join the service or the right to vote or african americans their rights to vote and attend the same places of business or slavery or prohibit alcohol and that its always the "liberal" side that seeks change.....there will always be the same two sides.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by lamar2006 View Post
    i wonder why most of the times its conservatives/republicans that have problems with minorities. i.e. hispanics, blacks, non religious people, immigrants, muslims etc etc. Why are conservatives less tolerant towards others than the rest of us??
    Really? I'm conservative and you don't seem very tolerant of me.

    I'm just asking so I can get on the correct side of the tolerance line.....

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    You can say what you want about "militant" atheists (a ridiculous term in my opinion, but that's for a different thread), but any atheist worth his salt that was in charge isn't going to be saying something this fantastically stupid and divisive.
    Visit my Blog.



    "Glad the GOP finally came out with an Obamacare alternative. Can't wait to see their alternative to the Iraq War." - @LOLGOP

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