1. Drew Doughty, D
2. Jonathan Bernier, G
3. Thomas Hickey, D
4. Colten Teubert, D
5. Ted Purcell, RW
6. Oscar Moller, RW
7. Brian Boyle, C
8. Trevor Lewis, C
9. Wayne Simmonds, RW
10. Vyacheslav Voinov, D
11. Matt Moulson, LW
12. Jeff Zatkoff, G
13. Peter Harrold, D
14. Jonathan Quick, G
15. Alec Martinez, D
16. Bud Holloway, C
17. David Meckler, C
18. Scott Parse, LW
19. Marc-Andre Cliche, RW
20. Geordie Wudrick, LW

1. Drew Doughty, D

Fresh from the 2008 Entry Draft, Doughty makes his debut on the Kings Top 20 in the first overall position. After great deliberation, the Kings selected Doughty second overall in the draft with the expectation that he will be the cornerstone piece on the blueline for the next decade.

There is little that Doughty lacks. Intelligent and highly skilled with leadership qualities, he will attend training camp in Los Angeles with a strong opportunity to win a roster spot, if not fulltime, then for the first nine games permitted before being optioned back to his junior squad. Regardless of what training camp ultimately holds for Doughty, it is more a matter of when, not if, he will make significant contributions to Los Angeles. With the most upside of any prospect in the Kings organization, and playing at a position that is in desperate need by Los Angeles, Doughty is the team's future No. 1 defenseman and is the offensive counterpart to the physical, steady play of blue-chipper Jack Johnson.

2. Jonathan Bernier, G

Stepping aside to make room for Doughty at the top of this list, but with no less expectation or excitement, is Jonathan Bernier. The margin between the two prospects is slim, but whereas Bernier is on track to be a very good NHL goaltender, Doughty can be the very best at his position. But Bernier is just as important to the future of the Los Angeles Kings.

In camp, Bernier will have a strong opportunity to make the opening night roster. But Bernier will need to beat out other goaltenders with more NHL experience to win a spot. As it will be better for his development to play a full season in the AHL than backup duty in the NHL, Bernier might be spending most of his time as the clear No. 1 goaltender for Manchester in the upcoming season. If the handful of AHL regular season games that Bernier played in at the end of last season are any indication, he might prove to already be too good for the league and find himself in Los Angeles soon enough as the best candidate to be the first homegrown starter for Los Angeles in franchise history. But the Kings should be smart with his development and not rush him into situations he is not yet prepared for, even when the clamor of the fans for his return to Los Angeles become deafening.

3. Thomas Hickey, D

While Doughty and Bernier are clearly the top two prospects for the Kings, Thomas Hickey is the strong leader of the second tier of prospects, comprising those with high NHL potential but not at an elite level. Hickey was drafted as an offensive defenseman, but has recently shown a bit of grittiness to his game that will help him adapt to, and compete at, the NHL level if he can add a few more pounds of muscle to a relatively slight frame. He has already signed an entry-level contract with the Kings, but still has junior eligibility left, leaving an option to return to Seattle of the WHL should he not make the Kings roster in camp. With no less than four prospects from this Top 20 list battling for the final defensive roster spot on the Kings, it is likely that Hickey will return to the WHL for the upcoming season. Doughty and Johnson are penciled in as the future top defensive pairing for Los Angeles, but the offensive skills of Hickey match up perfectly with the physical aggression of Teubert to form a potent future second pairing.

4. Colten Teubert, D

The second of two first-round choices for Los Angeles during the 2008 Entry Draft, Teubert was the product of a series of trades that began with Michael Cammalleri being moved to the Calgary Flames. Lombardi went into the draft wishing to obtain a second pick in the top 15 to add even more talent to a beleaguered system of defensive prospects. Where Doughty is an elite all-around defensive prospect, Teubert adds that big and physical element on the blueline that only Johnson has been able to provide in the system. Teubert plays a style that is absolutely necessary on any roster, but he has a limited offensive ceiling, especially in comparison to Doughty and Hickey. His physique, attitude and mental make-up are premium attributes of Teubert as a future defensive defenseman for Los Angeles.

5. Ted Purcell, RW

The first forward appears on this list at No. 5. But with the likes of Anze Kopitar, Patrick O’Sullivan, Dustin Brown and Alexander Frolov all 26 years of age or younger, there is little immediate need for a forward on the NHL roster. As such, the Kings have concentrated more on defense and goaltender in recent drafts. Purcell joined the organization as an undrafted free agent out of college hockey and immediately dominated the AHL as a rookie, posting exceptional goal, assist and point totals. His play with Manchester earned him a call-up to Los Angeles where he more than held his own. Purcell is on the brink of making the NHL roster full time and will be yet another young forward added to an already robust stable of skilled 20-somethings upon which the Kings are building their future.

6. Oscar Moller, RW

After being drafted in 2007, Moller went on an offensive run with Chilliwack of the WHL that vaulted his name to the top of most up-and-coming lists. He will have his opportunity to show that his offensive streak was not a fluke during training camp, but with as many young forwards already on the NHL roster as the Kings have, as well as a number of others in Manchester pushing for playing time, Moller is likely to spend another season in juniors. Following up the 2007-08 season with another equally stout performance will bring Moller to Manchester at the end of this season as arguably Manchester’s best pure goal scorer. As the long-term roster for the Kings begins to take shape over the next couple of seasons, look for Moller to push for playing time and take over the spot of such current veterans as Kyle Calder or Derek Armstrong.

7. Brian Boyle, C

When Boyle was drafted in 2003, it was widely recognized that he was a long-range developmental project who required patience. Five years later, the investment in Boyle is finally beginning to pay dividends. Temporarily converted to a defenseman in an attempt to capture a higher ceiling as a No. 1 defenseman instead of an energy forward, Boyle returned to his natural position of center midway through the 2007-08 season with a better understanding of the defensive positioning of a forward. While the conversion did not bear fruit in terms of a top defenseman, it made Boyle a better two-way center, one who can match up against the opposition’s elite scoring center and shut him down. In a brief stint with Los Angeles last season, Boyle more than impressed, holding his own defensively and demonstrating his ability to score near the crease. Boyle will likely break camp on the Los Angeles roster and be slotted in as the third or fourth line center. If the season progresses as hoped, Boyle may graduate from prospect status before the next ranking of Kings prospects.

8. Trevor Lewis, C

Up to this point in his career, Lewis has been more potential than production. With a full season of professional hockey under his belt, he needs to start converting that potential into goals as Manchester will be relying heavily on the young forward. Lewis demonstrated good offensive skills and skating ability last season, even if he struggled to find the back of the net for the Monarchs. But Lewis is still only 21 years of age and not lacking in his skill set. He needs to refine his game and start translating his smooth skating and puck control into points for his team. Other Kings prospects have jumped over Lewis on the depth charts as they have shown that their game is successful in the professional ranks whereas Lewis still needs to make his mark. He will get his opportunity this season, his second of professional hockey, as one of the lead forwards for Manchester.

9. Wayne Simmonds, RW

Simmonds has come a long way in only a single season. Drafted as a relative unknown, he attended training camp very thin on his 6’2 frame and extremely raw in skills. Nevertheless, he impressed enough that the Kings kept him in camp for as long as possible before finally being returned to juniors just before the end of preseason. Simmonds did not score at the record pace that Moller did, but contributed at a steady pace throughout the season, both in terms of points, physical play and leadership. His all-around game led to being named to Team Canada for the U20 World Juniors Championship, a difficult task in itself. Because Simmonds has more of a physical game than a skilled game, he is a perfect candidate to be thrust onto the Kings roster at a young age and learn on the job, similar to the path taken by Dustin Brown.

10. Vyacheslav Voinov, D

The third of three defensemen on this list taken by the Kings during the 2008 Entry Draft, Voinov has already signed an entry-level contract and will be playing in North America, the ultimate location to be determined in training camp. Voinov is a skilled offensive defenseman who, at this young age, sometimes is overly aggressive. Like Simmonds, Voinov is very raw. But because Voinov plays on defense, a position difficult to learn at the NHL level, and his game is more skilled, he is likely to spend much more time in the minor leagues honing his raw skills than Simmonds. The current controversy over Voinov’s signing with the Kings to the dismay of the Continental Hockey League (KHL) may impact his development as there is uncertainty over when Voinov should be permitted to cross to North America. Regardless of the finer legal points to the transition, Voinov had expressed a clear interest in coming to North America immediately, the first step in his development as an NHL defenseman.
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