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  1. #226
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    I haven't really read much about Michigan this season, how are they shaping up for the new season, always enjoy the games between ND and Michigan.

  2. #227
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    Quote Originally Posted by RockneNDIrish View Post
    I haven't really read much about Michigan this season, how are they shaping up for the new season, always enjoy the games between ND and Michigan.
    I dont think its going to be pretty.
    Free Doug

  3. #228
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    I just found this, 20 questions with Chris Smith, former ND fullback

    http://www.journalgazette.net/apps/p...GS02/808270269

  4. #229
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    Quote Originally Posted by poodski View Post
    I know "why" he isnt calling them I just dont get why. If that makes sense.

    ND didnt sign him for 10 years to not call the plays. He is a an offensive genius and as much as I dont like ND, he should be calling the plays. He brought in a DC so let that guy run the D and just focus on your offense. Thats your bread and butter treat it as such. Not many people in college football can run an offense like Charlie and taking that out of his hands at least to me is a huge mistake. I understand delegating, but when you are so much better than anyone else at the job you should take the reins.

    Also have you ever been to ND stadium? Like I said I dont care much for ND but its beautiful. I love it there. I was at the UCLA game 2 years ago when they won in the last minute with the pass to Shark. I was about 20 rows up on the 35 yardline. Just simply amazing. And last year I got to go the USC game. If you watch the game in the endzones they have bleachers and me and behindmydesk were in the third row of them on the south endzone.

    Simply amazing seats. The song girls walked 7 feet from us and I actually got to stand on the grass. I ll never get to do that again. I try to go to at least one game a year.
    Oh yea, both those games i took you to were awesome seats. The one game you took me to against Syracuse, was good seats too, 40 yd. Remember that ND was up big but couldn't block the end on PATs, and Fitzpatrick ended up getting hurt. Oh and funny story guys, after the 1st quarter , Po, starts getting pissed off at hte play calling for syracuse. Ever single play was run wide left. Every time ND had like 3 defenders waiting for him. Po starts screaming, no wonder you guys suck, you keep doing the same thing to no avail. Then he starts telling people around him, that weren't as astute as him, that he can tell what the play is before the snap, and said watch this they will run left wide. Then they'd do it, and people would ask him how'd you know that. It was commical, of course we were drunk as hell but it was commical.
    Therefore he doesn't exist
    So poof...vamoose son of a b itch

  5. #230
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    Quote Originally Posted by poodski View Post
    I know "why" he isnt calling them I just dont get why. If that makes sense.

    ND didnt sign him for 10 years to not call the plays. He is a an offensive genius and as much as I dont like ND, he should be calling the plays. He brought in a DC so let that guy run the D and just focus on your offense. Thats your bread and butter treat it as such. Not many people in college football can run an offense like Charlie and taking that out of his hands at least to me is a huge mistake. I understand delegating, but when you are so much better than anyone else at the job you should take the reins.

    it's not the delegating that was the problem it was game management & dealing with all his players as an entire team as opposed to focusing strictly on the offense guys. i guess the why is that he wants to be more connected to the whole team instead of just the offense. as a head coach, that helps the team be more unified (imo) & feel apart of something. even though charlie may seem more like a cheerleader on the sidelines now, it's going to pay off down the road.
    Cheers,
    --Tank

  6. #231
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    Even if he seems like a cheerleader on the sideline i bet Weis and Haywood are going over certain plays behind closed doors, theoretical situations and which plays should be called in a certain situation, things of that nature, so where as to the public he seems to have absolutely no imput into the play calling, they would of gone over certain things in private. There does seem to be a bit of unity around the team, good atmosphere around training camp...

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  7. #232
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    Well here's an article all about the offense complete with an interview of OC Mike Haywood. I do remember reading in another interview that Charlie will tell Haywood sometimes whether he wants a run or pass play and then Heywood will pick the particular play. Thought that was kind of weird.

    http://www.blueandgold.com/content/?aid=5798

    Man Rockne that picture of Rudolph definitly confirms that he is a true freshman.

  8. #233
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    I'm happy that we will be running the ball more this season, we were pretty poor in that field last year, but then again when the defense is in the backfield before you hand it off to the RB you are never going to be able to gain good yardage. I like Haywood, i feel pretty confident that he will callt he right plays at the right time, looking forward to seeing just how much we pound the ball against SD.

    Tell me about it Jerry, was looking around for some better ones but couldn't find one, not used to putting Freshman in the fold straight away. Got a sig request in the graphics section for a Clausen sig so it wont be up for long lol
    "It isn't necessary to see a good tackle. You can hear it."- Knute Rockne



    Welcome to ND 2009

  9. #234
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    pounding the ball against SDST will mean little, that dline is horrible for sdst
    Therefore he doesn't exist
    So poof...vamoose son of a b itch

  10. #235
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    True but even agains't a poor D-Line it sets the foundations, running certain plays, seeing how the defense reacts, how smoothly we run it etc...
    "It isn't necessary to see a good tackle. You can hear it."- Knute Rockne



    Welcome to ND 2009

  11. #236
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    Yourrrrrrrrrrr 1-0 Temple Owls ladies and gentlemen

  12. #237
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    Quote Originally Posted by JHG722 View Post
    Yourrrrrrrrrrr 1-0 Temple Owls ladies and gentlemen
    Al Golden was definitely the right coach for that job and he is going to continue to turn that football program around. At the same time don't get to excited because everyone beats Army....everyone.

    Also watch out for some Heisman candidates to come out of this thread.

    Nate Davis(Poodski's boy) - 21/24 for 290 yards and 3tds
    Dan LeFevour - 21/31 for 217 yards and 3tds ; 42 rushing yards
    COME VISIT THE PSD FITNESS FORUM!!![/B][/CENTER]

  13. #238
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    Got to say that I'm amazingly frustrated at the minute, watching all these college football games, and we still have a week until we see our guys take the field.

    Nice article:

    Exhibit A: In four years at LSU, running back Joseph Addai never rushed for 1,000 yards in a single season. He scored 18 career touchdowns. By contrast, eight Bowl Subdivision running backs reached that mark last fall.

    Today, Addai is considered one of the most complete running backs in the NFL as a key cog for the Indianapolis Colts.

    Exhibit B: After a promising sophomore season that saw him eclipse the 1,000-yard mark, Notre Dame's Ryan Grant was his team's second option his last two years (2003, 2004) on campus. He rushed for just 515 yards as an oft-injured senior and yielded to freshman Darius Walker.

    And yet today he is a rich man. This summer, he signed a four-year contract with the Green Bay Packers that could be worth as much as $30 million.

    These days, college running backs don't necessarily have to put up staggering yardage totals to secure a future at the next level. And that could be good news for Notre Dame's current trio of tailbacks, who all figure to earn carries in what is being billed at the moment as a running back-by-committee system.

    James Aldridge, a junior and the elder statesman of the bunch, says that's just fine with him.

    "I'm not complaining," Aldridge said. "I think it's a good situation, an opportunity to keep your legs fresh and just kind of slow down a lot of the wear and tear.

    "You have one back who's always in the game and always getting every carry, naturally there is going to be some wear and tear. But with the opportunity of having three backs, it's promoting your offense and being smart."

    Aldridge and sophomores Robert Hughes and Armando Allen, all received an introduction to college football last season. Aldridge was the team's leading rusher, carrying the ball 121 times for 463 yards after seeing limited time as a freshman in 2006. Hughes ran for 294 yards on 53 carries. Allen carried 86 times for 348 yards.

    Hughes, a 5-foot-11, 237-pound Chicago product who has the lowest center of gravity among the three, came on strongest at the end of the season, stringing together back-to-back 100-yard games. But he did it against two of the weakest defensive teams on Notre Dame's schedule, Duke and Stanford.

    The intention of Irish head coach Charlie Weis and offensive coordinator Mike Haywood is to take advantage of the strengths of each of their backs. Aldridge and Hughes are both downhill bruisers, while Allen has faster straight-line speed.

    All three were highly recruited coming out of high school. While it's a dilemma that a lot of coaches would love to have, their presence in a crowded backfield raised the possibility that one or more would become disgruntled. At least judging by public statements, that hasn't happened.

    "After you get a chance to see these guys play," Aldridge explained, "it's like, 'Wow, these dudes, if they get some carries on the field, they can help out.' You don't have to be a rocket scientist to notice that.

    "You see Armando, he's out there flying, let's get him on the field. And you see Rob just blast somebody, let's get him on the field."

    Allen said sharing the load isn't anything new.

    "We had two backs in my high school," he said. "It was kind of like we split the carries, and that was fine with me, so I'm willing to take on whatever role the coaches have to offer for me.

    "I think it's actually beneficial. Having multiple backs instead of one, it's very beneficial. So I think that's a good thing instead of a bad thing."

    In 2005 and 2006, Weis' first two seasons at Notre Dame, Walker was unequivocally the top option at running back. So much so, in fact, that Travis Thomas, his primary backup in '05, was moved to linebacker in 2006.

    But that was then and this is now. When Walker left unexpectedly after his junior year, landing with the Houston Texans as an undrafted free agent, Weis had an opportunity to tinker with his formula.

    Weis' willingness to stray from his own stated featured back philosophy may also have its roots in the changing landscape of the league he came from, the NFL. After all, football, as Weis himself has said, is a "copycat" game when it comes to schemes and strategy.

    Five years ago, in 2003, there were 13 NFL running backs that carried the ball at least 300 times. Last season, that number slipped to six.

    It's not an anomaly. More and more teams at the professional level are using two tailbacks — for example, until he signed with Seattle this offseason, former ND standout Julius Jones surrendered almost all his goal-line opportunities, and eventually his starting position, to Marion Barber in Dallas.

    A large reason for the decreased workloads is preserving the health of backs. Over the last decade or so, Atlanta's Jamal Anderson, Denver's Terrell Davis, Seattle's Shaun Alexander and, most recently, Kansas City's Larry Johnson have all broken down, some for good, in the wake of a season of massive carries.

    The college level, Weis explained, gives coaches even more of an opportunity to use more backs, for the simple reason that they have more players at their disposal.

    In the NFL, teams can carry 53 players on their rosters, but only 45 on their game day active list. In the NCAA Bowl Subdivision (formerly Division I-A), a team can carry 85 scholarship players — along with an unlimited number of walk-ons.

    "Now, because you have a larger number of players on your roster, you have more people to choose from," Weis said. "And I kind of like the talent at the position. I don't want to inhibit a good player from getting some playing time."

    Of course, there may be drawbacks to a running back-by-committee approach. A lot of running backs like to get into the flow of the game by carrying the ball consistently. Notre Dame, for example, was pretty much unbeatable from 2004-06 whenever Walker had 20 or more carries.

    Plus, there is at least some suspicion that when the dust settles, a featured back may emerge after all. Hughes was the man at the end of last season, he received by far the most carries in the spring game in April, and he looked the best of the three at ND's three-hour open practice this fall.

    But at least for the time being, Notre Dame hopes that all three of its backs fill a role this fall that allows the offense to best utilize their individual attributes.
    Althoght it is a 3 running back attack i still expect taht Hughes will get the majority of the carries, Allen will be a dangerous guy on PR and KR, he has some speed and Aldridge can grind out a few yards along with Hughes. I see what they are saying about the benefits of having more than one tailback, and i think we will see that this year, not only does it offer some rest to some of the backs to keep them fresher through the season, but it also offers a different look, between Hughes and Allen. Looking forward to seeing this running offense against San Diego.........BRING ON THE SEASON
    "It isn't necessary to see a good tackle. You can hear it."- Knute Rockne



    Welcome to ND 2009

  14. #239
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    hughes and aldridge have a similar running style (bruising north south runner) and then having allen (scat back east west runner) will compliment them. i'm looking forward to it.
    Cheers,
    --Tank

  15. #240
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    I just wish it would bloody hurry up and get here, i have watched 4 football games this weekend, and read about 100 stories on the Irish. But yet we still have 5 days to wait.
    "It isn't necessary to see a good tackle. You can hear it."- Knute Rockne



    Welcome to ND 2009

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