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Cadarn
06-13-2009, 04:56 PM
A convicted terrorist can sue a former Bush administration lawyer for drafting the legal theories that led to his alleged torture, ruled a federal judge who said he was trying to balance a clash between war and the defense of personal freedoms.

The order by U.S. District Judge Jeffrey White of San Francisco is the first time a government lawyer has been held potentially liable for the abuse of detainees.
http://www.google.com/hostednews/ap/article/ALeqM5gnOvtUV8wKxu1PA_F3rlTPRH3rhgD98Q08Q00

surprise, surprise. the district court that's destroying america.
thank goodness for the supreme court.

cabernetluver
06-13-2009, 05:20 PM
It always brightens my day to see someone advocating torture. (dripping sarcasm)

GGGGG-Men
06-13-2009, 05:27 PM
http://www.google.com/hostednews/ap/article/ALeqM5gnOvtUV8wKxu1PA_F3rlTPRH3rhgD98Q08Q00

surprise, surprise. the district court that's destroying america.
thank goodness for the supreme court.

How exactly is that court "destroying America"?

dbroncos78087
06-13-2009, 06:02 PM
How exactly is that court "destroying America"?

Well the court is stepping up as the actual 3rd branch of the United States of America's government as opposed to just going lock step with the Executive branch. Ironically the main attack on Obama is that he is a tyrant or king yet the same people that feel that way also think the courts are obligated to rubber stamp everything the executive branch does under the veil of "National Security".

blenderboy5
06-13-2009, 11:00 PM
But can the lawyers actually be punished for doing their jobs? We're not talking about aiding a holocaust here. And what kind of punishment did this man face?

cabernetluver
06-14-2009, 01:09 PM
But can the lawyers actually be punished for doing their jobs? We're not talking about aiding a holocaust here. And what kind of punishment did this man face?

To directly answer your question, no, not if they were actually doing their job as opposed to trying to create a smokescreen to allow illegal acts to occur. It is a fine line.

blenderboy5
06-14-2009, 01:28 PM
To directly answer your question, no, not if they were actually doing their job as opposed to trying to create a smokescreen to allow illegal acts to occur. It is a fine line.

Understand. And agree in theory. I don't know enough about the case to comment further than that, really. And unless he's one of the terrrorists who were waterboarded (and I don't think he was) I can't make blanket statement.