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DenButsu
08-12-2008, 10:57 PM
http://www.barackobama.com/images/bo_headers/header_obama_05.jpg

Democratic National Convention
August 25-28, 2008 Denver (http://www.demconvention.com/)

~~~

Please use this thread for posting news, information and
discussion about the Democratic National Convention



















.

SmthBluCitrus
08-12-2008, 11:21 PM
Schedule of Events

Monday, August 25

"One Nation"

Michelle Obama
(Introduced by Craig Robinson)
Claire McCaskill (Sen - MO)
Nancy Pelosi (Rep - CA)
Tribute to Ted Kennedy

Former President Jimmy Carter
Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi
Congressman Jesse Jackson, Jr. of Illinois
Denver Mayor John Hickenlooper
Minnesota Senator Amy Klobuchar
Miami Mayor Manny Diaz
Illinois state leaders Alexi Giannoulis, Dan Hynes, Lisa Madigan
Tom Balanoff from Illinois SEIU
NEA President Reg Weaver
AFT President Randi Weingarten
NARAL Pro-Choice America President Nancy Keenan
Senator Claire McCaskill of Missouri
Former Indiana Representative Lee Hamilton
Chicago City Clerk Miguel del Valle
Maya Soetoro-Ng - Barack Obama’s half-sister
Jerry Kellman - “Mentor and long-time friend of Barack Obama”




Tuesday, August 26

"Renewing America's Promise"

Hillary Clinton (Sen - NY)
Mark Warner (Fmr Gov - VA)

Vermont Senator Patrick Leahy
West Virginia Governor Joe Manchin, Chair of the Democratic Governors’ Association
Iowa Governor Chet Culver
California State Controller John Chiang
Change to Win’s Anna Burger
AFL-CIO President John Sweeney
Planned Parenthood of America President Cecile Richards.
Pay Equity pioneer Lilly Ledbetter
Governor Brian Schweitzer of Montana
Governor Deval Patrick of Massachusetts
Governor Kathleen Sebelius of Kansas
Governor Janet Napolitano of Arizona
Governor Jim Doyle of Wisconsin
Governor Ed Rendell of Pennsylvania
Governor Ted Strickland of Ohio
Governor David Paterson of New York
Senator Bob Casey, Jr., of Pennsylvania
Former Secretary of Energy and Transportation Federico Peņa
House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer
House Democratic Caucus Chair Rahm Emanuel
Representative Xavier Becerra (D-CA), Assistant to the Speaker of the House;
Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee (DCCC) Chair Chris Van Hollen
Representatives Nydia Velazquez (D-NY)
Linda Sanchez (D-CA)
Tammy Baldwin (D-WI)
Eleanor Holmes Norton (D-DC)
Mike Honda (D-CA)


Wednesday, August 27

"Securing America's Future"

Sen. Joe Biden
(Vice Presidential Nominee, Delaware)
Bill Clinton
(Fmr President)

Governor Bill Richardson
Massachusetts Senator John Kerry
Former Senate Majority Leader Tom Daschle
Rhode Island Senator Jack Reed
Chicago Mayor Richard Daley
Senator Evan Bayh
Senator Joe Biden
Senator Jay Rockefeller
Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid
Convention home state Senator Ken Salazar
House Majority Whip James E. Clyburn
Congressman Robert Wexler (D-FL)



Thursday, August 28

"Change You Can Believe In"

Barack Obama
(Sen - IL/Presumed Nominee)
(Invesco Field)

Al Gore
(Fmr Vice President)

DenButsu
08-12-2008, 11:28 PM
Thanks, SmthBluCitrus. :cool:

I'd like to defer to conservative/Republican posters for doing the above type stuff in the Republican Convention thread, if you all would like to do so. If you need any help with anything, let me know and I'll try to do what I can. FWIW, I tried to make the top posts of each thread as similar to each other as possible.

SmthBluCitrus
08-12-2008, 11:32 PM
Thanks, SmthBluCitrus. :cool:

I'd like to defer to conservative/Republican posters for doing the above type stuff in the Republican Convention thread, if you all would like to do so. If you need any help with anything, let me know and I'll try to do what I can. FWIW, I tried to make the top posts of each thread as similar to each other as possible.

Welcome. I figured a schedule of events would be appropriate. I'll try to keep it as updated as I can -- for instance, filling in the VP's name.

rhino17
08-13-2008, 05:07 AM
My first day of school at Colorado is the same day as the convention

DenButsu
08-13-2008, 07:26 AM
My first day of school at Colorado is the same day as the convention

Where in CO?

ari1013
08-13-2008, 09:14 AM
You might want to add Mark Warner to Tuesday night. Hillary's warming up the crowd for his big address.

rhino17
08-13-2008, 12:14 PM
Where in CO?

CU

b1e9a8r5s
08-13-2008, 06:10 PM
Bill Kristol of the weekly standard is reporting that Colin Powell will endorse Obama and possibly speak at the convention. It's on fox news as well as Drudge.

Of course this is coming from the "blowhards" from the right, so I don't know if you lefties can trust it. :)

http://elections.foxnews.com/2008/08/13/kristol-colin-powell-to-endorse-barack-obama/

PHX-SOXFAN
08-13-2008, 06:27 PM
Bill Kristol of the weekly standard is reporting that Colin Powell will endorse Obama and possibly speak at the convention. It's on fox news as well as Drudge.

Of course this is coming from the "blowhards" from the right, so I don't know if you lefties can trust it. :)

http://elections.foxnews.com/2008/08/13/kristol-colin-powell-to-endorse-barack-obama/

I'm reading this as well. I don't see why it wouldn't be true. Foxnews has the sources from the right and Powell has talked quite a bit with Obama lately.

Here's another good article I was reading about Republicans that are endorsing Obama:

http://www.azcentral.com/news/election/election08/articles/2008/08/12/20080812obama0812republicans.html

DenButsu
08-13-2008, 10:51 PM
CU

Boulder's my hometown. :)

You're gonna have a kickass time there, guaranteed.

Who knows, maybe you'll even become a Broncos/Nuggets fan.... :p

You'll find your way around Boulder easily enough. It's a small town. If you drink, you might want to get a fake ID, because there are a lot of great bars. (Of course, I personally would never advocate doing anything illegal like that, but I don't know you, so I'm just saying you might want to...)...

In Denver, Lower downtown - LoDo - is where the Pepsi Center and Coors Field are. There are about 1,387 sports bars around there, and no shortage of great microbrews. If you go there, there's a classic jazz bar called El Chapultapec just across the street from Coors Field. It's a must go place in Denver. You should at least stop in for a beer and some good tunes when you go down there.

You have to see a concert or two at Red Rocks. Or even just go there when there's no show. But that place is the best. (The Fox Theater in Boulder is a really great place for shows, too - killer sound there). The Mountain Sun brewery in Boulder has great microbrews... might be a little too "hippie" for ya, though. :smoking: You're about to get a lot of hippie exposure (or at least fake trust fund hippie exposure) when you go to Boulder. :laugh2:


/end off topic nostalgia rant

SmthBluCitrus
08-13-2008, 10:59 PM
LoL! Hilarious DB

DenButsu
08-13-2008, 11:20 PM
LoL! Hilarious DB

Well, I'm probably not making it back home this year... but my brother and his family (they live abroad, too) went in June, and now all this talk centering around the convention is making me feel a bit nostalgic. Growing up there, it was an easy place to outgrow, but I really love Colorado.

Doc Fluty
08-14-2008, 01:30 AM
The convention keynote speaker, who will also be speaking Tuesday, has just been announced. It's former Governor Mark Warner.

Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton, Obama's rival during the Democratic presidential primaries, is also scheduled to speak that night, Aug. 26. But Warner is being given the plum position, according to an e-mail that Obama campaign adviser Mike Henry sent to Virginia supporters late Tuesday.

http://www.talkleft.com/story/2008/8/13/32955/7378

so much for tuesday being "hillary night"

DenButsu
08-14-2008, 02:59 AM
I just saw in this report (http://tpmelectioncentral.talkingpointsmemo.com/2008/08/colin_powell_spokesperson_kris.php) that a Powell spokesperson had issued a statement say that Kristoll was wrong and the report was false.

DenButsu
08-14-2008, 11:39 AM
Obama And Hillary Reach Deal On How To Conduct Convention

The Hillary and Obama campaigns have finally reached an official deal on how to handle her role at the convention -- her name will be placed in nomination, as a way to assuage her embittered supporters and minimize the possibility of strife at the Denver gathering, according to two sources familiar with the deal.

Obama and Hillary advisers decided that this course was preferable to having her name not introduced, the sources say.

One source confirmed that there will be a roll call vote at the convention, probably on the third day, with her name in entrance, and that Hillary will encourage her supporters to vote for Obama.

"This will recognize the historic nature of the primaries, honor the voices of everyone who participated, and help with party unity," the source says.

The second source says that the Hillary campaign, under pressure from its supporters, expressed concern about her backers making noise at the gathering and finding a way for their voices to be heard. The Obama campaign was also considering how to ensure that and offered the idea of putting her name in nomination, the source says.

This resolution, which was the product of joint negotiations between the two campaigns, runs directly counter to what some Hillary critics in recent days were describing as an effort on her part to hijack the convention proceedings. New York Times columnist Maureen Dowd, for instance, recently wrote that Hillary "feels no guilt about encouraging her supporters to mess up Barack Obama's big moment."

But people in both the Obama and Hillary camps say that this is pure fiction. Indeed, as Marc Ambinder reported this morning, tensions between the two camps were greatly exaggerated.

Indeed, according to sources, the only problem the Obama camp had was with the tiny minority of vocal Hillary supporters who were threatening to make trouble. Obama advisers say that they had no issue with Hillary or her advisers' handling of the negotiations.

A joint press release on the deal is forthcoming.talkingpointsmemo (http://tpmelectioncentral.talkingpointsmemo.com/2008/08/obama_and_hillary_reach_deal_o.php)


Well, now that that's settled, Obama can probably roll out his veep choice pretty soon here.

Doc Fluty
08-14-2008, 11:56 AM
ok but what if hildog gets A LOT more votes than either anticipate?

Doc Fluty
08-16-2008, 03:08 PM
Has Hillary taken over the convention?


Can you imagine if the shoe were on the other foot? If Hillary had won the nomination and Obama were asking to have his delegation recognized? Do you really think that Michelle would be speaking one night introduced by the Obama daughters and Barack would have a speaking engagement the next night? Not on your life! Bill and Hillary would have mowed Obama down in a heartbeat, and they still might try.

Yet already the list of what Hillary wants and what Hillary gets is unprecedented for somebody who lost the nomination. She gets a prime-time address where she will be introduced by daughter Chelsea. She gets her own team to produce a hagiographic video of her.

Hubby Bubba gets a prime-time speech on Wednesday night. And Hillary gets a platform plank that uses "glass ceiling" language right out of her speech to suggest she would be the nominee if not for sexism.

A few more big-ticket items and she'll be the co-nominee. Maybe that's the point.

It reminds me of a Cold War joke about how the Russians view a compromise. They come to the table and announce the rules: What's mine is mine, what's yours is negotiable.

How would President Obama respond?

I think we just found out.

http://caffertyfile.blogs.cnn.com/2008/08/15/has-hillary-taken-over-the-convention/

DenButsu
08-16-2008, 08:04 PM
Look man, here's the bottom line: It was a close race, Hillary's supporters want an acknowledgment of that (of course she does, too), and Obama doesn't have a problem with it - especially if it means they'll have an easier time finding their way not only to voting for him but being his enthusiastic supporters. Hillary is going to direct her supporters to vote for Obama. Surely not all of them will, but a helluva lot of them will. I'd expect the margin to favor Obama by no less than 75-25 or 80-20, which is a very reasonable price to pay for the support of a pretty massive and well organized bloc of voters.

SmthBluCitrus
08-18-2008, 03:25 PM
Wes Clark will not be in attendance. (story below)

I don't think it is a good idea to piss him off. Clark could do a wonderful job working inside the administration -- and there are a lot of people that regard him with such esteem that they'd like to see him as VP.

Just another attempt by the Obama camp to show that they're now in charge of the party (I'm bitter to an extent -- those of you that know me know why). Seriously, they'll fly the White House to Chicago. :p


Obama to General Wesley Clark: Your Services Not Needed

General Wesley Clark is not attending the Democratic National Convention. I was told by General Clark's personal office in Little Rock that he would not be attending.

Clark was informed by Barack Obama's people that there was no reason to come.

General Clark has been given no role of any kind at the convention.

Rubbing salt in the wound even more, the "theme" of Wednesday's Democratic convention agenda is "Securing America."

Wesley Clark's PAC also happens to be called SECURING AMERICA.
http://www.thewashingtonnote.com/archives/2008/08/obama_to_genera/

Tragic Johnson
08-18-2008, 06:55 PM
Monday, August 25

"One Nation"

Michelle Obama
(Introduced by Craig Robinson)
Claire McCaskill (Sen - MO)
Nancy Pelosi (Rep - CA)
Tribute to Ted Kennedy


Is it "open bar" that night?

RogerRomo
08-18-2008, 09:44 PM
Is it "open bar" that night?

Yeah. I also hear its sponsored by the taxi service. Wouldn't want another mishap. Just looking at the bill of events... ugh... So many commies, so little time. I sure hope they solve our glo-BULL-warming problem while they are there. So maybe one of you democrats can answer my question. Is it really true they are trying to make this the largest "Green" event in America? Count me out, I love my carbon footprint. Pass that steak over there too! mmm mmm delicious!

DenButsu
08-18-2008, 09:59 PM
Is it "open bar" that night?

No need for that. Braun's is right in the parking lot in front of the entrance to the Pepsi Center. If you drink fast, you could be out for a quick brew and back in within 15-20 minutes. And if you're taking a slightly longer break, then there are literally hundreds of bars within a 5-15 minute walk from the Pepsi Center in LoDo. I wish I could be back there for that week. It will, pretty much, be one big party. We Democrats enjoy our vices. :smoking:

Oh, I know the Republicans do, too - only secretly. Maybe Larry Craig will make a surprise appearance in Minneapolis - if he makes his way out of the airport bathroom there. (I hear that he's "intimately" familiar with it).

Tragic Johnson
08-18-2008, 11:52 PM
No need for that. Braun's is right in the parking lot in front of the entrance to the Pepsi Center. If you drink fast, you could be out for a quick brew and back in within 15-20 minutes. And if you're taking a slightly longer break, then there are literally hundreds of bars within a 5-15 minute walk from the Pepsi Center in LoDo. I wish I could be back there for that week. It will, pretty much, be one big party. We Democrats enjoy our vices. :smoking:

Oh, I know the Republicans do, too - only secretly. Maybe Larry Craig will make a surprise appearance in Minneapolis - if he makes his way out of the airport bathroom there. (I hear that he's "intimately" familiar with it).

No doubt, and I think that it would be nice of you guys if you had the courtesy to warn the Hollywood liberal actors who will be attending your convention that, when they have sex with underage girls, to be sure not to tape it. It would be embarrassing if that happened again.

DenButsu
08-19-2008, 12:01 AM
No doubt, and I think that it would be nice of you guys if you had the courtesy to warn the Hollywood liberal actors who will be attending your convention that, when they have sex with underage girls, to be sure not to tape it. It would be embarrassing if that happened again.

Good advice, and be sure to relate the same to the religious right ministers attending the Republican convention who are buying meth over the phone from the gay prostitutes they're banging, since those guys can record those calls, too.

Tragic Johnson
08-19-2008, 02:59 AM
Good advice, and be sure to relate the same to the religious right ministers attending the Republican convention who are buying meth over the phone from the gay prostitutes they're banging, since those guys can record those calls, too.

Right, maybe Hussein Obama can give guidance about where to find drugs and Barney Frank can lend them hand in the gay prostitute department (no pun intended).

In the mean time, if Eliot Spitzer, after he gets done boning one of the thousands of prostitutes who will be making their way to Denver that week, wants to make sure she doesn't mention it to anyone, tell him to ask Gary Condit what to do.

BG7
08-19-2008, 03:30 AM
I wonder if Al Gore will be speaking Wednesday night as the VP nominee. What other reason would there be for Al Gore not having a speaking spot assigned at the Democratic Convention?

DenButsu
08-19-2008, 08:12 AM
Obama can give guidance about where to find drugs

Nah. That's Dubya's job.

Tragic Johnson
08-19-2008, 09:48 AM
Nah. That's Dubya's job.

You obviously need to read Hussein's own book.

RogerRomo
08-19-2008, 01:03 PM
Nah. That's Dubya's job.

I assume by Dubya you mean our president. President George W. Bush? Or have you already cast him aside and starting calling Obama the 183 day senator who never cast a vote about the Iraq war or anything for that matter? Is he now the President? Obama is a racist, elitist, pompous ***. Best quote from your fearless sheep herder: "America is the greatest nation in the world, and I plan to change that. With your vote I can" :confused:

DenButsu
08-20-2008, 01:21 AM
You obviously need to read Hussein's own book.

At least he's HONEST about his history of drug use.

You know, the first step of recovery is admitting that you've got a problem.

Guess Georgie Boy never took that one....

Tragic Johnson
08-20-2008, 11:24 AM
At least he's HONEST about his history of drug use.

You know, the first step of recovery is admitting that you've got a problem.

Guess Georgie Boy never took that one....

Well, he doesn't deny his drug use, he just refuses to talk about it, and if you read between the lines when he's asked about it, he's practically telling you that he did drugs. I guess he should do the honorable thing like Bill Clinton and just straight out lie about it, apparently, that's ok.

DenButsu
08-20-2008, 11:37 AM
Well, he doesn't deny his drug use, he just refuses to talk about it, and if you read between the lines when he's asked about it, he's practically telling you that he did drugs. I guess he should do the honorable thing like Bill Clinton and just straight out lie about it, apparently, that's ok.

No, Clinton should have just said he smoked it. "Didn't inhale" was not only obvious bull****, but also made the story worse by keeping it alive and making himself look skeezy about it.

SmthBluCitrus
08-24-2008, 06:17 PM
About time to make this a sticky, yea?

DenButsu
08-24-2008, 07:50 PM
About time to make this a sticky, yea?

Yes, indeed, thanks for the reminder.

-------------

And yes, this will be unstuck when the convention's over and the Republican convention thread will likewise be stuck while it's going on, jic anyone's wondering.

DenButsu
08-25-2008, 08:32 AM
Hey, SmthBluCitrus, do you know where a schedule might be found that includes the times when speakers are supposed to go on? I checked the official site, they don't have it. (They don't even have Biden as the veep speaker on Wed. - slackers). Here in Japan it starts at 7:00 a.m. tomorrow. If, say, Pelosi is the first speaker, I sure don't feel the need to wake up extra early for that. :smoking:

SmthBluCitrus
08-25-2008, 08:41 AM
The only official "schedule" that I've seen is the overview on the DNC site that gives us the days headline speaker and the cast list of the days other speakers -- but, no times. They're pretty loose with times though. Speeches tend to run over length

http://www.demconvention.com/schedule/

SmthBluCitrus
08-25-2008, 08:54 AM
I did, however, update our schedule on page 1 on this thread.

DenButsu
08-25-2008, 08:59 AM
I did, however, update our schedule on page 1 on this thread.

Okay, cool, thanks. :cool:


I can't believe they still don't officially have Biden on the schedule there. That's a pretty major fail.

ari1013
08-25-2008, 12:33 PM
Wes Clark will not be in attendance. (story below)

I don't think it is a good idea to piss him off. Clark could do a wonderful job working inside the administration -- and there are a lot of people that regard him with such esteem that they'd like to see him as VP.

Just another attempt by the Obama camp to show that they're now in charge of the party (I'm bitter to an extent -- those of you that know me know why). Seriously, they'll fly the White House to Chicago. :p


http://www.thewashingtonnote.com/archives/2008/08/obama_to_genera/
I'm sure he'll be given a cabinet spot. This is just someone sensationalizing the fact that Clark isn't speaking. And quite frankly, that's a good thing. Clark's not that great at public speaking.

Wrigleyboy25
08-25-2008, 12:36 PM
How do you guys foresee the democrats screwing this one up?

SmthBluCitrus
08-25-2008, 12:36 PM
I'm sure he'll be given a cabinet spot. This is just someone sensationalizing the fact that Clark isn't speaking. And quite frankly, that's a good thing. Clark's not that great at public speaking.

Oh, I'm sure he'll be involved in an Obama administration. But, to not even invite him to the biggest Dem party of the year is really a slap in the face, regardless of sensationalism or not. No, Clark isn't a great orator, but he still needs to be in Denver (in my opinion).

I just don't think it is wise to try and alienate the man -- not saying that's what is happening, but it could certainly be viewed that way.

Randy West
08-25-2008, 12:42 PM
How do you guys foresee the democrats screwing this one up?

They could invite a murderer like Teddy to come speak

That would be one way of turning off some voters

I know I am not watching it now because he will be there.

I have a problem with any organization that props up a murdering drunk as someone to look up to and listen to

DenButsu
08-25-2008, 06:16 PM
They could invite a murderer like Teddy to come speak

That would be one way of turning off some voters

I know I am not watching it now because he will be there.

I have a problem with any organization that props up a murdering drunk as someone to look up to and listen to

Yeah, um...

Fail.

OnWisconsin2007
08-25-2008, 06:18 PM
I guarantee Obama is going to give an awesome speech. It's just up to the talking heads at FOX News to decide how they're going to spin their negative segments about the DNC.

SmthBluCitrus
08-25-2008, 06:23 PM
Agreed. This will be the biggest speech of Obama's political career. And if history holds true, it will be awe inspiring.

Randy West
08-25-2008, 07:20 PM
Yeah, um...

Fail.

I am not sure why


You will be all ears though??

Or was that for Teddy.........failing to get some help while a young woman drowned??

DenButsu
08-25-2008, 07:25 PM
I am not sure why


You will be all ears though??

Or was that for Teddy.........failing to get some help while a young woman drowned??

The reason why is that there is about a 98% overlap between people who agree with your characterization of Kennedy and avid Rush Limbaugh listeners. It's a moot point when it comes to undecideds. Most people without an attack agenda are pretty much just going to be looking at him as an old political icon who had a stroke earlier this year - some mild interest, maybe a bit of sympathy, probably not much scorn or excitement.

Conversely, it doesn't particularly help the Dems beyond energizing the base, but that's part of the goal of a convention.

OnWisconsin2007
08-25-2008, 07:26 PM
I'm seriously going to become ill soon. I'm SO angry, watching Fox News. Literally, all they do is talk about Obama's shortcomings. They have their big personalities that host the shows, and then all they do is bring on conservatives to talk about how bad of a President Obama will be. They don't interview democrats, they don't talk about what Obama does well, all it is is fear mongering and hate speech about Obama - and of course this is the station that has "fair and balanced" news.

SmthBluCitrus
08-25-2008, 07:29 PM
Curious -- which channel will you be watching for the convention?

I'll be on MSNBC to watch my Chuckster ... Mr. Todd.

OnWisconsin2007
08-25-2008, 07:32 PM
Fox is now showing McCain's political commercials, and then talking to people who are trying to prove them correct. "Fair and balanced", all right. I am still waiting for 1, ONE mention of something even a little bit pro-Obama.

OnWisconsin2007
08-25-2008, 07:33 PM
The "McCain Response Team" is now being interviewed...."Fair and balanced".

Randy West
08-25-2008, 07:37 PM
The reason why is that there is about a 98% overlap between people who agree with your characterization of Kennedy and avid Rush Limbaugh listeners. It's a moot point when it comes to undecideds. Most people without an attack agenda are pretty much just going to be looking at him as an old political icon who had a stroke earlier this year - some mild interest, maybe a bit of sympathy, probably not much scorn or excitement.

Conversely, it doesn't particularly help the Dems beyond energizing the base, but that's part of the goal of a convention.

I would agree for the most part

Except for the energizing the base comment, I think he is just a model of old democrats and does nothing to bring " change " or even the thought of it to the convention.

I was not really characterizing Kennedy with that statement, just pointing out one of the main reasons he should have been out of politics long ago.

DenButsu
08-25-2008, 07:40 PM
I would agree for the most part

Except for the energizing the base comment, I think he is just a model of old democrats and does nothing to bring " change " or even the thought of it to the convention.

I was not really characterizing Kennedy with that statement, just pointing out one of the main reasons he should have been out of politics long ago.

Calling him a "murderer" isn't characterizing him? :shrug:


And Kennedy does energize the base - at least a certain sector of it. The name and the man personally still carries a lot of clout in the party.

Randy West
08-25-2008, 07:43 PM
Calling him a "murderer" isn't characterizing him? :shrug:


And Kennedy does energize the base - at least a certain sector of it. The name and the man personally still carries a lot of clout in the party.

Not when you actually murder someone

when that happens it is called telling it like it is:clap:

I kind of thought his popularity within the part and pretty much overall were on the decline these last couple of years

Iodine
08-25-2008, 07:47 PM
I was there today and will be untill thursday

It is ****ing amazing besides actually getting into the pepsi center

OnWisconsin2007
08-25-2008, 07:52 PM
Is anybody else watching Fox News? Seriously, this is absolutely sickening. They're at the DNC, only talking with Republicans, and only bashing Obama. I honestly hate Fox News and anybody that works there.

Randy West
08-25-2008, 07:54 PM
Is anybody else watching Fox News? Seriously, this is absolutely sickening. They're at the DNC, only talking with Republicans, and only bashing Obama. I honestly hate Fox News and anybody that works there.

Do you watch it and ask yourself how they have the nerve to use the term, fair and balanced

Once I couldn't answer that question I quit watching

OnWisconsin2007
08-25-2008, 07:56 PM
Do you watch it and ask yourself how they have the nerve to use the term, fair and balanced

Once I couldn't answer that question I quit watching

I'm just watching now, because I want to see if they say anything pro-Obama. Hell, what about interviewing an Obama spokesperson or a liberal. They are at the DNC, after all. But I've seen 3 conservatives interviewed already.

OnWisconsin2007
08-25-2008, 07:59 PM
Bill Maher is giving an AWESOME interview on MSNBC right now.

OnWisconsin2007
08-25-2008, 08:21 PM
Nancy Pelosi just made a great point.

"America needs a President who thinks Healthcare is a right, not a privelege."

Something like that. I liked it.

SmthBluCitrus
08-25-2008, 08:28 PM
" ... and John McCain is wrong"

That was almost like rote memorization.

yaowowrocket11
08-25-2008, 08:29 PM
I'm not a big fan of Pelosi, but that was a pretty good speech.

DenButsu
08-25-2008, 08:30 PM
CNN has live coverage, but it's all talking heads. I can stream all the uninterrupted speeches online. But my computer and TV are in different rooms. It's pretty annoying.

Mostly been watching the pundits, though. I understand why they put Pelosi on stage, but she's really not a very good speaker. Pretty robotic and stale.

DenButsu
08-25-2008, 08:31 PM
Hadn't seen the above comments when I posted, so I guess I'm in the minority...

Just to be clear though, I was talking more about her delivery than the content.

OnWisconsin2007
08-25-2008, 08:38 PM
Pelosi isn't a major speaker, though. She kinda just furthered the message of the convention. She got a nice smile, comes across generally nice, and didn't do anything to rub anybody the wrong way.

SmthBluCitrus
08-25-2008, 08:38 PM
Agreed DB. Pelosi certainly isn't the most adept public speaker. But, she got the message across, albeit rigidly.

yaowowrocket11
08-25-2008, 08:38 PM
CNN has live coverage, but it's all talking heads. I can stream all the uninterrupted speeches online. But my computer and TV are in different rooms. It's pretty annoying.

Mostly been watching the pundits, though. I understand why they put Pelosi on stage, but she's really not a very good speaker. Pretty robotic and stale.

She is robotic, I agree with that, but the actual speech itself, was pretty good. She is not a great speaker, but she did say some good things. I didn't expect much of her, but she sort of came up in the clutch. :shrug:

OnWisconsin2007
08-25-2008, 08:41 PM
She made sense. Obama is right, McCain was WRONG. Pretty simple, and everybody that watched it could understand it.

DenButsu
08-25-2008, 08:54 PM
JJ Jr. ... now that's delivery. :nod:

SmthBluCitrus
08-25-2008, 09:22 PM
Teddy's my Senator, too :)

OnWisconsin2007
08-25-2008, 09:35 PM
Go Ted Kennedy!

SmthBluCitrus
08-25-2008, 09:59 PM
Sweet, Jim Leach is up next. Former Iowa Congressman (Republican). Fairly exciting.

KH12
08-25-2008, 10:54 PM
Michelle :clap:

Wrigleyboy25
08-25-2008, 10:58 PM
Sweet, Jim Leach is up next. Former Iowa Congressman (Republican). Fairly exciting.
Can't top Zell.

SmthBluCitrus
08-25-2008, 11:04 PM
Can't top Zell.

Trade ya! :D

One Zell for a Leach and a Chafee

SmthBluCitrus
08-25-2008, 11:24 PM
Well, all-in-all I think it was a good first night.

Michelle and Barack had some pretty good banter at the end, and their kids were cute -- especially Sasha. "What city are you in Daddy?"

Barack must have been mistaken though. At first he said he was in St. Louis then he said he was in Kansas City. Long day for him though. He was in Davenport, Iowa to start the day and went elsewhere in the state afterwards.

b1e9a8r5s
08-26-2008, 12:09 AM
Hi guys. I was wondering what you dems thought of the night/day as a whole. I only so the tail end of Michelle and then the commentary from most of the news channels (flipping around). It seems there is some debate as to the overall strategy of the night. Obviously they were trying to go pretty soft, and the goal was to make Michelle come across as likable and "normal", which I think they accomplished. I know Carville called it a wasted night, and Gergen didn't think they accomplished much. I'm not trying to start a fight here, just wondering what you guys thought of the overall strategy, not really attacking McCain/Bush on the first night. I didn't watch enough to have an overall impression myself.

Just talking about the strategic aspect, not this is why republicans suck or all that.

SmthBluCitrus
08-26-2008, 12:23 AM
I think they were going for more of a party unity thing tonight, and portraying Michelle as "likable and normal," like you said, to a national audience.

But, I think that's why we saw the Ted Kennedy tribute tonight. It really inspires the base and works towards bringing those disgruntled Hillary backers back into the fold. Because, if there's something we can get behind, it's Ted Kennedy.

I think they got accomplished what they wanted. Michelle looked great, they got a few shots at McCain early on (Pelosi's speech), and Kennedy came out. Overall success.

DenButsu
08-26-2008, 01:08 AM
Hi guys. I was wondering what you dems thought of the night/day as a whole. I only so the tail end of Michelle and then the commentary from most of the news channels (flipping around). It seems there is some debate as to the overall strategy of the night. Obviously they were trying to go pretty soft, and the goal was to make Michelle come across as likable and "normal", which I think they accomplished. I know Carville called it a wasted night, and Gergen didn't think they accomplished much. I'm not trying to start a fight here, just wondering what you guys thought of the overall strategy, not really attacking McCain/Bush on the first night. I didn't watch enough to have an overall impression myself.

Just talking about the strategic aspect, not this is why republicans suck or all that.

I watched almost all of it in one form or another (often watching the CNN commentary rather than the speakers - my webcast from the DNC site was choppy and at times unwatchable, and CNN was cutting away from the less major speeches a lot).

First and foremost, I'd have to say that for a while there I thought they might be at Coors Field instead of the Pepsi Center, because Michelle just hit it right out of the park. She addressed so many campaign points - biography, patriotism, the significance of Obama's message and its historical context - and a lot of it really effectively refuted the bogus smears about them, I thought. It wasn't just, "here's who I am, and here's who Barack is, thank you." It was, "here's who we are, and here's WHY we are who we are, and here's how that connects to why he's running for president." It was very concise at the same time it cast a wide net.

And while it probable resonated a lot more strongly with party members than the general public, I though the whole Teddy thing also packed a pretty powerful punch. (How's that for alliteration? :cool: ). The best thing about that in practical terms was that, without getting into overtly "we need to unify" rhetoric, it was a moment that had a distinctly unifying effect. Some of the delegates there might disagree about Obama and Hillary, but they can all agree on the Kennedys, and having Teddy appear like that and give a surprisingly amped up and spirited speech probably went a long way - just on a purely emotional level - towards bringing some of the fractured elements in the room together and bridging the differences between them.

So those were the clear highlights, and they served their purpose well.

That said, I do think the overall script of the night ends up kind of reading like:

blah, blah, blah, blah, TEDDY!, blah, blah, MICHELLE!

My biggest disappointment was Jim Leach. I think that was a real wasted opportunity for someone from across the aisle to get up on stage and say "Here's why even though I'm a Republican, I'm supporting Obama: bam! bam! bam!" But what did we get? "The first debate was blah-de-blah-de-blah-blah-blah, and the second debate with Lincoln was blah-de-blah-de-blah-blah-blah, and the third debate with Roosevelt was blah-de-blah-de-blah-blah-blah, and the..." //(CNN cuts away from the speech with all the pundits, left and right, ridiculing how boring it is)// Giving the ball to a supporter from the other party is a fantastic idea on paper, but if you're gonna do it, you have to make sure he's actually gonna do something with the damn ball!!!



But pretty much, since it was "this is who we are" night, and that's what they wanted to do, mission accomplished. As Gergen said, Michelle Obama saved the night, and I do think her speech is such a major standout that by the end of tomorrow night nobody will even remember that there was some boring stuff before it.

Tomorrow, I'm damn sure that Patrick Leahy won't be pulling any punches, and I doubt Bob Casey will be, either. When it comes to Hillary, everyone's talking about "unity", but she knows how that works, and she can be an attack dog too, so I expect to see her going after Bush pretty heavily. So I think we'll get more meat starting tomorrow and continuing for the next 3 nights.

OnWisconsin2007
08-26-2008, 01:12 AM
You know, this entire DNC is like a big movie. It's just crazy. You got guys that are going up just to diss the opponent hardcore in front of the nation. A few are going to show unity in the party. Some people have a job to Schmooze up Barack. Then the Republicans try to pull the most BS garbage out they can. It's pretty crazy to me.

NotVeryOriginal
08-26-2008, 02:31 AM
http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/world/us_and_americas/us_elections/article4609445.ece



US police are investigating whether they have foiled an assassination plot against Barack Obama after four people were arrested near the Democratic convention in Denver in the possession of high powered rifles.

One of the suspects told police they were "going to shoot Obama from a high vantage point using a ... rifle ... sighted at 750 yards," Denver television station CDS4 is reporting. Police have told the television station that one of the suspects "was directly asked if they had come to Denver to kill Obama. He responded in the affirmative."

The suspects were arrested on Sunday when local police arrested a man , identified by the television station as Tharin Gartrell, 28, who was driving a rented pickup truck erratically. CDS4 is reprrting that in his truck police found two high powered rifles with telescopic sites, as well as camouflage clothing, walkie-talkies, a bulletproof vest, a high powered spotting scope, licences in the names of various people, and the drug methamphetamine. One of the rifles is listed as stolen from Kansas.

continues...

Thoughts?

DenButsu
08-26-2008, 03:12 AM
http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/world/us_and_americas/us_elections/article4609445.ece



Thoughts?

I think it's a sad commentary on the state of affairs in America.

But kudos to the cops for doing a good job.

DenButsu
08-26-2008, 03:42 AM
That said, I do think the overall script of the night ends up kind of reading like:

blah, blah, blah, blah, TEDDY!, blah, blah, MICHELLE!

When I wrote this, it was my own impression, but I was also basically agreeing with James Carville, who had been suggesting the Dems needed to go after Bush/McCain more.

But Andrew Sullivan disagrees (http://andrewsullivan.theatlantic.com/the_daily_dish/2008/08/the-carville-cr.html):


The Carville Critique

25 Aug 2008 11:20 pm

The notion that tonight should have been about ripping the bark off the president seems to me misplaced. No one needs to be persuaded that the country is on the wrong track. We have endured one of the worst presidencies in American history, a stalling economy, and a war that was as deceptively packaged as it was poorly executed. The wrong track number is at 80 percent. What was necessary tonight was rebutting the only real weapon the Republicans have: dragging Obama into the mud, throwing every extremist attack they can at him, painting him as a commie, alien, anti-American freak. For good measure, they had tried to paint Michelle as an angry black radical.

They failed. There was nothing more American than the way the Obamas spoke of their story. It made them more appealing to the white working class and the black working class. It defused the smears. And, taken as whole, it also gave the Democrats some good feeling with the Kennedys.

There was plenty I didn't like about this night, as you can tell if you scroll down. But it succeeded in the most important task. Michelle did it. She more than did it. She struck fear in the GOP tonight. Their lies about the Obamas will fail. As they should.

SmthBluCitrus
08-26-2008, 08:45 AM
My biggest disappointment was Jim Leach. I think that was a real wasted opportunity for someone from across the aisle to get up on stage and say "Here's why even though I'm a Republican, I'm supporting Obama: bam! bam! bam!" But what did we get? "The first debate was blah-de-blah-de-blah-blah-blah, and the second debate with Lincoln was blah-de-blah-de-blah-blah-blah, and the third debate with Roosevelt was blah-de-blah-de-blah-blah-blah, and the..." //(CNN cuts away from the speech with all the pundits, left and right, ridiculing how boring it is)// Giving the ball to a supporter from the other party is a fantastic idea on paper, but if you're gonna do it, you have to make sure he's actually gonna do something with the damn ball!!!


Yea, but you have to understand who Jim Leach is. He's not your typical modern Republican. He didn't get in line with the rally for war in Iraq in 2002/03. And, he was also the only House Republican that voted against the Bush tax cuts.

He's more of an old school conservative Republican. I was sad to see him lose his seat in 2006 to Dave Loebsack. It was nice getting that seat blue (it's a district that has been trending Democrat), but it really was a shame to lose Leach. He cared more about being bi-partisan than he cared about party lines.

ari1013
08-26-2008, 09:20 AM
Hi guys. I was wondering what you dems thought of the night/day as a whole. I only so the tail end of Michelle and then the commentary from most of the news channels (flipping around). It seems there is some debate as to the overall strategy of the night. Obviously they were trying to go pretty soft, and the goal was to make Michelle come across as likable and "normal", which I think they accomplished. I know Carville called it a wasted night, and Gergen didn't think they accomplished much. I'm not trying to start a fight here, just wondering what you guys thought of the overall strategy, not really attacking McCain/Bush on the first night. I didn't watch enough to have an overall impression myself.

Just talking about the strategic aspect, not this is why republicans suck or all that.
A little more than that -- the whole night was intended to show that the Obamas are a down-to-earth family. This was clearly an effort to combat all the McCain attack ads. I think they did a pretty good job of that, but then again I'm going to have a biased outlook.

ari1013
08-26-2008, 09:23 AM
When I wrote this, it was my own impression, but I was also basically agreeing with James Carville, who had been suggesting the Dems needed to go after Bush/McCain more.

But Andrew Sullivan disagrees (http://andrewsullivan.theatlantic.com/the_daily_dish/2008/08/the-carville-cr.html):
Exactly. Carville's still bitter that nobody's listening to him anymore after he advised during the losing efforts in 2002 and 2004. All the old-guarde people are really angry at Dean's direction.

hoosiercubsfan
08-26-2008, 09:39 AM
Question for the thread is what do you think of Biden as the veep pick? Does this hurt the candidate of change mantra Obama was running on? I understand the need for Biden with all his foreign policy experience and BO's lack there of. But with Biden being in Congress longer than McCain he also is only about 6 years younger than McCain. Does this also kind of put a damper on the whole age thing that has been run out against McCain?

SmthBluCitrus
08-26-2008, 10:04 AM
I'm actually excited about the Biden pick. It really hurts the "Obama doesn't have experience" attack, because Biden will be there. And I don't really think it hurts the Obama "change" message. In all, people are voting for Obama before they're voting for Biden.

I don't really know what it'll do to the McCain is old argument though. McCain is old and he's the guy running for President. I don't think Biden being an older guy means as much, because he's the #2. Not that I want either guy to die while in office, that would be tragic.

The one thing that could really hurt is if Biden starts running his mouth and making idiotic comments. But, I'm sure the campaign will have him on a leash. Like somebody said before, Biden is an attack dog for the election more than anything. It's his experience that they're really looking forward to utilizing after January.

ari1013
08-26-2008, 10:15 AM
Question for the thread is what do you think of Biden as the veep pick? Does this hurt the candidate of change mantra Obama was running on? I understand the need for Biden with all his foreign policy experience and BO's lack there of. But with Biden being in Congress longer than McCain he also is only about 6 years younger than McCain. Does this also kind of put a damper on the whole age thing that has been run out against McCain?
The change mantra itself has changed. In the primaries it was change from the typical Washington establishment politician. In the generals it's become change from what we've had over the past 7 years.

DenButsu
08-26-2008, 12:13 PM
Yea, but you have to understand who Jim Leach is. He's not your typical modern Republican. He didn't get in line with the rally for war in Iraq in 2002/03. And, he was also the only House Republican that voted against the Bush tax cuts.

He's more of an old school conservative Republican. I was sad to see him lose his seat in 2006 to Dave Loebsack. It was nice getting that seat blue (it's a district that has been trending Democrat), but it really was a shame to lose Leach. He cared more about being bi-partisan than he cared about party lines.

Don't get me wrong, now... I wasn't looking for fire and brimstone. The Democrats, by definition, are not, and don't want to be, Zell Millers. That's not what I was looking for at all.

What I was looking for, however, was just clarity of message. "Hi, I'm Jim. I'm a Republican. Because of that, you're probably wondering why I'm here. Well, let me tell ya. A, B, and C."

That's all I was hoping for. Just a clear, simple message that would not only preach to the choir but find its way out of the Pepsi Center and into the ears of independents and undecideds. And it didn't do that. And that's why I'm saying, "What a waste of an opportunity".

SmthBluCitrus
08-26-2008, 12:23 PM
Gotcha.

redsox12
08-26-2008, 12:47 PM
RICHMOND, Va. - Former Gov. Mark Warner plans to offer a lesson in Virginia-style bipartisanship to thousands of hardcore Democrats in his convention keynote speech Tuesday night.

"There may be parts of the speech that aren't going to get a lot of applause," Warner said Monday, "but I've got to say what I believe will get our country back on the right path."

Some Democrats were already complaining, saying that Warner's job is to put a dent in Republican John McCain's image.

"This isn't the Richmond Chamber of Commerce," said Democratic consultant Paul Begala.

For Mark Warner, who is seeking the Senate seat of retiring Republican John Warner, a red-meat speech that would bring the party's most passionate warriors to their feet in Denver would undermine a carefully cultivated image at home that has given him a strong lead in statewide polls and a lopsided fundraising advantage.

Nothing about the presidential campaign indicates that either side is willing to speak kindly of the other or its nominee. Rhetoric and advertising from both Democrat Barack Obama and McCain turned caustic early.

Warner's election as governor in 2001 revived a moribund Democratic Party in a state where Republicans controlled every statewide office or elected institution of government. For Warner to work with a General Assembly that was overwhelmingly Republican when he took office, bipartisanship was not optional.

Now, in the race to replace a moderate senator, Warner is appealing to independent and even Republican voters by billing himself as a "radical centrist" in his campaign against rigidly conservative former Gov. Jim Gilmore.

"I'm not going to say one thing in Richmond or in Danville and another thing at the Democratic Convention in Denver. I understand some folks may not like that, but ... you know, I'm a job applicant," Warner said.

Warner, who is at the forefront of Democratic candidates who appear likely to expand the party's one-seat majority in the Senate this fall, is also part of a Democratic strategy to pry Virginia and its 13 electoral votes from the solidly Republican South.

Obama's campaign, hoping to win Virginia for a Democrat for the first time since 1964, selected Warner to deliver the 15-minute keynote address. Four years ago, Obama — then a Senate candidate from Illinois — delivered the keynote.

yahoo.com

I'm excited to hear his speech tonight.

SmthBluCitrus
08-26-2008, 10:16 PM
I love Ted Strickland!

OnWisconsin2007
08-26-2008, 11:03 PM
Hillary is verbally throttling the Republican party. Wow.

hoosiercubsfan
08-26-2008, 11:06 PM
Hillary is verbally throttling the Republican party. Wow.

Did you really expect anything different?

b1e9a8r5s
08-26-2008, 11:06 PM
Did Hillary just say that John McCain was against women making the same as men?! LOL. I didn't know that was part of the platform.

SmthBluCitrus
08-26-2008, 11:06 PM
Yea she is. Go Hill!

OnWisconsin2007
08-26-2008, 11:15 PM
Hillary just smashed that speech out of the ball park.

b1e9a8r5s
08-26-2008, 11:20 PM
All in all, I think Hillary did very well (coming from a repub).

KingJamsI
08-26-2008, 11:21 PM
hill-dogg just killed it. that was a beast of a speech.

KingJamsI
08-26-2008, 11:22 PM
Don't get me wrong, now... I wasn't looking for fire and brimstone. The Democrats, by definition, are not, and don't want to be, Zell Millers. That's not what I was looking for at all.

What I was looking for, however, was just clarity of message. "Hi, I'm Jim. I'm a Republican. Because of that, you're probably wondering why I'm here. Well, let me tell ya. A, B, and C."

That's all I was hoping for. Just a clear, simple message that would not only preach to the choir but find its way out of the Pepsi Center and into the ears of independents and undecideds. And it didn't do that. And that's why I'm saying, "What a waste of an opportunity".

haha all i can think about is when Zell Miller challenged Chris Matthews to a duel.

b1e9a8r5s
08-26-2008, 11:48 PM
I do wonder about what the speech accomplished. I mean, I think she definitely took a step towards unity and talking to her voters to support Obama. However, I do wonder if this speech did much in terms of bringing in terms of independents. It still sounded like don't vote for McCain, because he's Bush term 3, but there wasn't a lot of "meat on the bone" in terms of what Obama brings to the table, IMO. Just my thoughts. Obviously, I'm biased. Although I do think she did a very good job in terms of bringing the party together, which seemed to be the #1 focus of the speech.

ink
08-27-2008, 12:35 AM
^^ I think Hillary knocked it out of the park in every way. I think she hit the right loyalty notes, the right party notes, gave a few great lines about the future, and placed all of it squarely behind Obama. It was a magnanimous speech, an eloquent speech, and it addressed lots of issues with a fair amount of detail. It was a great convention speech, and normally I don't find her speeches that compelling. This was one for the ages. It was from the heart and the mind. It would be hard for her to deliver a whole campaign at that level.

I also thought Warner's speech was excellent.

zam
08-27-2008, 02:28 AM
anyone see kucinich? he's the man. if you missed it, check it out on youtube, and watch at 4:28...hilarious.

ari1013
08-27-2008, 08:19 AM
I do wonder about what the speech accomplished. I mean, I think she definitely took a step towards unity and talking to her voters to support Obama. However, I do wonder if this speech did much in terms of bringing in terms of independents. It still sounded like don't vote for McCain, because he's Bush term 3, but there wasn't a lot of "meat on the bone" in terms of what Obama brings to the table, IMO. Just my thoughts. Obviously, I'm biased. Although I do think she did a very good job in terms of bringing the party together, which seemed to be the #1 focus of the speech.
There are more registered Democrats than Republicans -- by a large margin. If Obama can take 90% of the registered Democrats (like all Dem noms generally get), all he really needs is about 40% of the indies to win the election. Rallying the base is more important at this point since he's polling in the upper-70s among Dems in most polls.

b1e9a8r5s
08-27-2008, 12:46 PM
There are more registered Democrats than Republicans -- by a large margin. If Obama can take 90% of the registered Democrats (like all Dem noms generally get), all he really needs is about 40% of the indies to win the election. Rallying the base is more important at this point since he's polling in the upper-70s among Dems in most polls.

I don't know if I buy that arguement. I mean, people came out in huge numbers to register and vote in the democratic primaries while the republicans primary was decided much earlier and therefore there was less enthuiaism for the party and therefore to come out and register. I for one am not registered with either party but am a republican 99% of the time. I'm not disagreeing with the fact that the dems have more voters registered, I just don't think that translates to there being more dems than republican's in reality.

b1e9a8r5s
08-27-2008, 12:49 PM
I have a question to anyone who can answer. This is a direct quote from Hillary's speech....

"John McCain says the economy is fundamentally sound. John McCain doesn't think that 47 million people without health insurance is a crisis. John McCain wants to privatize Social Security. And in 2008, he still thinks it's okay when women don't earn equal pay for equal work."

Where did the last part come from (no equal pay for women)? Did I miss something? Is there any evidence or any incident or quote she is refering to in regards to that? Or was it just something to rally the fems?

SmthBluCitrus
08-27-2008, 01:00 PM
I don't know if I buy that arguement. I mean, people came out in huge numbers to register and vote in the democratic primaries while the republicans primary was decided much earlier and therefore there was less enthuiaism for the party and therefore to come out and register. I for one am not registered with either party but am a republican 99% of the time. I'm not disagreeing with the fact that the dems have more voters registered, I just don't think that translates to there being more dems than republican's in reality.

I can counter that by saying in Iowa, ari's comment is absolutely true. And, we were first in the nation. Our Dem registration numbers are trouncing GOP registration numbers in all but one district -- Iowa 5, which is the western part of the state and might as well be rural Kansas (in a political sense), represented by Steve King (R). He's considered the most "conservative" member of the House. But, even though they're registering the most for the GOP out there, the numbers are still way down from what they've been before.


Democrats push further ahead of GOP on Iowa's voter rolls (http://www.desmoinesregister.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2008807020375)

Registered Democrats widened their edge over Republicans in Iowa to more than 90,000 in June, according to voter-registration statistics scheduled for release today by the Iowa secretary of state.

The new numbers account for changes associated with the June 3 primary. They show that the number of Iowa voters who identified themselves as Democrats on their voter registration has continued to grow since January's record-setting presidential caucuses.

The trend is a blow to Republicans, who had described the surge in Democratic registration last winter as tied to the caucuses and not an indicator of general election strength.


Iowa leads Democratic charge (http://www.desmoinesregister.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20080811/NEWS09/808110333/-1/LIFE04)

The dramatic resurgence of registered Democrats in Iowa means the Midwestern battleground that Republican George W. Bush carried by a whisker four years ago may be far less competitive in November, national experts in voter registration say.

None of the states viewed early this year as competitive in the presidential campaign has swung more decisively than Iowa since Bush's re-election, based on a comparison of voter registration statistics.

The shift was spurred by intense interest in the Democratic presidential caucuses in January. However, it reflects a national trend that began years earlier, and is traceable to declining approval of the Republican president.

The last line there is the most telling;
"However, it reflects a national trend that began years earlier, and is traceable to declining approval of the Republican President"

OnWisconsin2007
08-27-2008, 01:02 PM
"And it makes sense that the two are appearing together in the Twin Cities, because it's awfully hard to tell them apart now-a-days."
-Hillary

Owned.

b1e9a8r5s
08-27-2008, 01:24 PM
The last line there is the most telling;
"However, it reflects a national trend that began years earlier, and is traceable to declining approval of the Republican President"


See, to me that reflects the disaproval of George Bush, which isn't news to anyone. But to say that all the sudden there are more democrats in the country than republicans, I don't buy. I think a lot of people who voted for Bush will be voting for Obama because they are unhappy with the job he did, but I don't think they are now, Democrats. I guess time will tell.

ink
08-27-2008, 01:29 PM
"And it makes sense that the two are appearing together in the Twin Cities, because it's awfully hard to tell them apart now-a-days."
-Hillary

Owned.

McCain's negative campaign is being run by Karl Rove disciple, Steve Schmidt. That alone ties him uncomfortably close to the Bush administration. And the fact that McCain did it of his own volition in early July because he couldn't win on message and merit, shows just how legitimate the "twinning" point is.

SmthBluCitrus
08-27-2008, 01:37 PM
See, to me that reflects the disaproval of George Bush, which isn't news to anyone. But to say that all the sudden there are more democrats in the country than republicans, I don't buy. I think a lot of people who voted for Bush will be voting for Obama because they are unhappy with the job he did, but I don't think they are now, Democrats. I guess time will tell.

Agreed, time will tell. But, the fact that they're actually crossing over to register as Democrats is big news -- that or it is a sign of the weak field of Republicans (based on the virtual "star power" of the Democrats in the primary).

Dems will take the state, that's for sure. And I think, in all, Dems take the country. There really is a whole new generation that has been inspired by this electoral cycle, as is evident by the record turnout among voters in the primary states. We could see a Democratic majority for a number of years. But, that will remain to be seen.

It's an exciting time to be a Democrat. :D

b1e9a8r5s
08-27-2008, 01:45 PM
Agreed, time will tell. But, the fact that they're actually crossing over to register as Democrats is big news -- that or it is a sign of the weak field of Republicans (based on the virtual "star power" of the Democrats in the primary).

Dems will take the state, that's for sure. And I think, in all, Dems take the country. There really is a whole new generation that has been inspired by this electoral cycle, as is evident by the record turnout among voters in the primary states. We could see a Democratic majority for a number of years. But, that will remain to be seen.

It's an exciting time to be a Democrat. :D

Yes Obama will win Iowa, as for the country, I still think that's up in the air. In the event that Obama does win (I think its probably 60% or so that he does), I think that he and Dems will have to produce results in his first term. While I know Obama has "inspired" a lot of dems, I think that there are many people who are voting against Bush/Republicans. Those people could easily "come back" to the Republican's if they are unhappy in 4 years.

Still, I can see why your excited.

(Can anyone answer my question from post 108?)

SmthBluCitrus
08-27-2008, 01:58 PM
Sorry b1, I somehow missed #108

McCain stayed away from Washington for the vote on a bill back in April that would've advocated equal pay for women.


"I am all in favor of pay equity for women, but this kind of legislation, as is typical of what's being proposed by my friends on the other side of the aisle, opens us up to lawsuits for all kinds of problems," the expected GOP presidential nominee told reporters. "This is government playing a much, much greater role in the business of a private enterprise system." -- John McCain

The Dem response:


"Senator McCain has yet again fallen in line with President Bush while middle-class families are falling by the wayside. Women are earning less, but Senator McCain is offering more of the same." -- Hillary Clinton


"At a time when American families are struggling to keep their homes and jobs while paying more for everything from gasoline to groceries, how on Earth would anyone who thinks they can lead our country also think it's acceptable to oppose equal pay for America's mothers, wives and daughters?" -- Karen Finney, DNC Spokesperson

They're (the Dems) also going to hammer that he's an ardent "anti-choicer," as opposed to a pro-lifer.

There's a list of other anti-women gripes about McCain from the left about halfway down the page on the right.

McCain on women's issues (http://www.ireport.com/docs/DOC-16327)

b1e9a8r5s
08-27-2008, 02:18 PM
Sorry b1, I somehow missed #108

McCain stayed away from Washington for the vote on a bill back in April that would've advocated equal pay for women.



The Dem response:





They're (the Dems) also going to hammer that he's an ardent "anti-choicer," as opposed to a pro-lifer.

There's a list of other anti-women gripes about McCain from the left about halfway down the page on the right.

McCain on women's issues (http://www.ireport.com/docs/DOC-16327)

Thanks.

PHX-SOXFAN
08-27-2008, 06:49 PM
the roll call vote is actually pretty entertaining. I just saw New Mexico yield their votes to Illinois, Illinois yeild them to New York, and New York have Hillary tell them to suspend the roll call and declare Obama the nominee in the spirit of Unity. Classy Move.:clap::clap::clap:

of course this all means she really hates him and doesn't support him:rolleyes:

SmthBluCitrus
08-27-2008, 07:03 PM
"It is with great pride that I announce Barack Obama is the Democratic nominee for President of the United States"
-- Nancy Pelosi

tingles

ari1013
08-27-2008, 07:04 PM
I don't know if I buy that arguement. I mean, people came out in huge numbers to register and vote in the democratic primaries while the republicans primary was decided much earlier and therefore there was less enthuiaism for the party and therefore to come out and register. I for one am not registered with either party but am a republican 99% of the time. I'm not disagreeing with the fact that the dems have more voters registered, I just don't think that translates to there being more dems than republican's in reality.
In 2006, the Democrats had a larger share of registered voters and they came out and delivered the Congress. If they come out in 2008, they can deliver the White House.

Even before all the late re-registrations, the Democrats still had a large majority of voters (about 38% to 31% back in January). Now they're over 40% and the Republicans are under 30%. So you're probably right about those last 2-3%, but the fact still stands.

ari1013
08-27-2008, 07:06 PM
I have a question to anyone who can answer. This is a direct quote from Hillary's speech....

"John McCain says the economy is fundamentally sound. John McCain doesn't think that 47 million people without health insurance is a crisis. John McCain wants to privatize Social Security. And in 2008, he still thinks it's okay when women don't earn equal pay for equal work."

Where did the last part come from (no equal pay for women)? Did I miss something? Is there any evidence or any incident or quote she is refering to in regards to that? Or was it just something to rally the fems?
It was more of a rally cry to ensure that the feminists don't desert the Democratic party. I really don't think McCain ever said anything like that. Though he did call his wife a ****... ;)

yaowowrocket11
08-27-2008, 08:50 PM
"It is with great pride that I announce Barack Obama is the Democratic nominee for President of the United States"
-- Nancy Pelosi

tingles

:clap:

SmthBluCitrus
08-27-2008, 09:28 PM
Bill Clinton knocked that one out of the park!

I miss Bill Clinton ...

ink
08-27-2008, 10:10 PM
Bill Clinton knocked that one out of the park!

I miss Bill Clinton ...

Vintage. Apparently Clinton has no doubts that Obama is "ready".

yaowowrocket11
08-27-2008, 10:10 PM
Bill Clinton knocked that one out of the park!

I miss Bill Clinton ...

:clap:

Bill was the man!

ari1013
08-27-2008, 10:58 PM
surprise visit for Obama... And Jill Biden just got a kiss

sboyajian
08-27-2008, 11:01 PM
I don't care what anyone says.. Michelle Obama just looks naturally happy and extremely proud. She appears to be sincere in a manner that just can not be faked.

DenButsu
08-28-2008, 12:30 AM
So much for the "the Clintons are going to sabotage the convention!" camp.


Sorry to disappoint. :smoking:

SmthBluCitrus
08-28-2008, 12:34 AM
:clap:

Bill IS the man!

Corrected that for ya! :cool:

SmthBluCitrus
08-28-2008, 12:42 AM
I didn't figure this was worthy of it's own new thread, so I'm posting it in the DNC thread ...


A changed slogan: "The Change We Need (http://www.politico.com/blogs/bensmith/0808/A_changed_slogan_The_Change_We_Need.html?showall)"

Barack Obama's campaign slogan has long been "Change We Can Believe In," and its constancy was a striking contrast in the primary with a Clinton campaign that shifted slogans as it groped for a clear message.

"Change We Can Believe In" carried an implicit contrast with Clinton, who had a trust problem. But it's a basically abstract message as the campaign moves to add flesh to Obama's notion of change.

And so Obama has made a rare tweak, changing the description of the change he's offering.

The new line: "The Change We Need."

That's the tag line in Obama's recent Ayers response ad. It's popped up at the convention, as in Dan Hynes' speech, and in the night's key address:

"Barack will finally bring the change we need," Michelle Obama said last night.

Stole it from John Edwards. :shush:


As President, I will make sure the voices of all Americans are heard in Washington. If we fight together, we can get the change we need and America will rise. -- John Edwards

DenButsu
08-28-2008, 01:19 AM
More good slogans from this convention:

McCain - More of the same

McCain - Not a maverick, Bush's sidekick

And my clear favorite line from any of the speeches so far, Brian Schweitzer's (http://jp.youtube.com/watch?v=I8iatxuU3OU):

"Now he wants to give those same oil companies another four billion dollars in tax breaks. Four billion dollars in tax breaks for big oil? That's a lot of change, but it's not the change that we need... Even the leaders of the oil industry know that Senator McCain has it wrong. We can't simply drill out way to energy independence. If you drilled everywhere - if you drilled in all of John McCain's backyards, even the ones he doesn't know he has... that single answer proposition is a dry well."

sboyajian
08-28-2008, 08:58 AM
It will change again, I am sure of it.. but it's a phase thing..

1. Change We Can Believe In
2. The Change We Need
3. dunno.. but it will be about getting the change..

it's a evolving theme slogan.. like a trifold brochure.. each one brings a new, but similar message.

SmthBluCitrus
08-28-2008, 09:03 AM
Well, I do know that the post-convention campaign is the "Campaign For Change."

qwestion13
08-28-2008, 03:38 PM
Bill Clinton's speech was great, but I wish people wouldn't applaud after every line. I feel like I was watching a Nicholas Cage movie with all of the one-liners Bill was throwing around haha...

Definitely looking forward to tonight's speech though. If Obama is elected, I will have so much more respect and confidence in the American people....

qwestion13
08-28-2008, 03:40 PM
It will change again, I am sure of it.. but it's a phase thing..

1. Change We Can Believe In
2. The Change We Need
3. dunno.. but it will be about getting the change..

it's a evolving theme slogan.. like a trifold brochure.. each one brings a new, but similar message.

I got one.....

Spare any chaaaange?? Do you have any change???? Chaannge?

BroadwayJoe
08-28-2008, 10:17 PM
DB... please tell me you caught yonder mountain performing at the DNC

i think you and i are the only two people on PSD who would understand this and how truly glorious it is

DenButsu
08-28-2008, 11:48 PM
DB... please tell me you caught yonder mountain performing at the DNC

i think you and i are the only two people on PSD who would understand this and how truly glorious it is

I understand it - but unfortunately couldn't catch it... it either wasn't broadcast on CNN or that happened before I woke up and turned it on. CNN skips over a lot of the speeches and musical events so the talking heads can flap their jaws.

I'll look for it on youtube. I'm sure it's there. :cool:

DenButsu
08-29-2008, 01:22 AM
From TPM (http://www.prosportsdaily.com/forums/showthread.php?t=265557):

(and HERE is the video link (http://jp.youtube.com/watch?v=eIX4P0fApmA&eurl=http://talkingpointsmemo.com/archives/211150.php))...


Strong Stuff
08.29.08 -- 12:19AM
By Josh Marshall

This is the last reaction clip we're going to post tonight. It's Alex Castellanos' response on CNN. To understand the significance, you've got to know a bit about who Castellanos is -- a longtime, street-fighting Republican political consultant with a reputation that compares to Lee Atwater's in terms hard-edged political warfare. I believe he's also informally working with the McCain campaign this cycle, as a sort of outside advisor.

Chuck Todd said below he thought Obama's speech had left the McCain camp speechless. My own take was that the tone of the statement from the McCain campaign was like someone who'd had the wind knocked out of them.

In that context, Castellanos' response was very telling. He made no attempt to put the speech in any positive context for McCain. Midway through this clip he sounds like an Obama surrogate. And he concludes by saying that "whoever didn't get picked for Republican VP today may be a lucky Republican."

SmthBluCitrus
08-29-2008, 01:30 AM
Nice dig. Yea, Castellanos is Republican to the core. I'm literally shocked to see this come out of his mouth.

I met him last year here in Iowa, he's a nice guy face-to-face, and he's a hell of a GOP consultant.

BroadwayJoe
08-29-2008, 10:20 AM
I understand it - but unfortunately couldn't catch it... it either wasn't broadcast on CNN or that happened before I woke up and turned it on. CNN skips over a lot of the speeches and musical events so the talking heads can flap their jaws.

I'll look for it on youtube. I'm sure it's there. :cool:

fear not! the set is already up on etree.org for dl!

http://bt.etree.org/details.php?id=518183

DenButsu
08-30-2008, 12:09 PM
BTW, for those who don't think Stewart razzes the Dems enough, check out the Friday episode of the Daily Show... he grills Obama and the whole Mile High production pretty good...